Archive for the ‘ CCTV Articles ’ Category

How to set up your TechproDDNS Acct

Written By:
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

How to set up your DVR for use with a TechProDDNS Domain

One of the problems with viewing your DVR remotely is that if your Internet service Provider or (ISP) changes your IP address, you may no longer be able to access your DVR.  Once properly configured, the TechPro DDNS (Dynamic DNS) service eliminates this common issue.

The way it works is by providing you with a domain name, like the following “”, that will always resolve to your current IP address. If the IP address changes, the DDNS service is notified by the DVR and updates the domain name to point to the new IP. Put simply, you can always reach your DVR by going to “”.

This document will show you how to setup your TechPro Security Products DVR in conjunction with a TechProDDNS domain name. It is important to note that some brands of DVRs may not work with DDNS, but all TechPro Security Products DVRs have this capability built-in.

Step 1 – Register for a TechPro DDNS Account.    

Step 2 – Set up a Domain Name.
Once your TechProDDNS account is set up, you will need to set up your domain name.


In the example above we chose the domain name “”, User ID: UserID1 and a Password: Password1.

You can choose any Domain Name, User ID and Password that you like, but they should be unique for each DVR.

Note: In Step 3 (the next step) you will have 2 options for configuring the DVR.

Option 1 is using the DVR Local interface and Option 2 is using the “Web Service” via Internet Explorer.

 If you use option 2, the web service, you must have the web service ActiveX Add-on, properly installed on Internet Explorer and your DVR must be on the same network as the computer you are using to access it.

Step 3 – Setup your DVR

Option 1 – DVR Local interface.
With a monitor and mouse connected to your DVR, login to the DVR Local Interface.


Select “Settings” icon from the Main Menu.


Next Select “Network” icon.


Note: The example below assumes that your network IP scheme follows the 192.168.1.? Convention. This is normally the case.   It also assumes that your Default Gateway (typically your router) has an IP address of



TechPro DVRs come with a default static IP address of This is normally fine and for the purposes of this document we are going to leave it that way. Do not check DHCP as we want this DVR to ALWAYS have the IP. If DHCP is selected it may pick up a random IP from you router.

Note: Just be sure that is not in your routers DHCP range. If it is another device on that network may get assigned to it and cause conflicts.

We also recommend that you change the HTTP Port from the default 80 to 88. Port 80 is the default HTTP port for many devices and may also be blocked or cause conflicts.

Once you are done scroll to the bottom of the page an turn on the checkbox, next to “DDNS”.
Then double click on “DDNS” to open the DDNS Settings.


Select “Dyndns DDNS” from the “DDNS Type” dropdown and turn on the “Enable” checkmark next to it. Now enter the following information.

Server IP:
Port: Do Not Change this. Unlike the HTTP Incoming Port, this should remain 80
Domain Name:
User Name: UserName1
Password: Password1

Select “Save” at the bottom of the “DDNS Settings” popup and “Save” at the bottom of the “Network Setting” Page.


Option 2 – Web Service (via Internet Explorer).
The setup is identical to the setting above but, the user interface of the web service is a bit different. In Internet Explorer go to, and login to your DVR.


Next Select “Network” from the navigation bar on the left.


Note: The example above assumes that your network IP scheme follows the 192.168.1.? Convention. This is normally the case.   It also assumes that your Default Gateway (typically your router) has an IP address of

TechPro DVRs come with a default static IP address of This is normally fine and for the purpose of this document we are going to leave it that way. Do not check DHCP since we want this DVR to ALWAYS have the IP. If DHCP is selected it may pick up a random IP from your router.

Note: Just be sure that is not in your routers DHCP range. If it is, another device on that network may get assigned to it and cause conflicts.

We also recommend that you change the HTTP Port from the default 80 to 88. Port 80 is the default HTTP port for many devices and may also be blocked or cause conflicts.

Once that is done, scroll to the bottom of the page and check the box next to “DDNS”.

Select “Save” at the bottom of the page.

Now Select “DDNS” under the “Network” Menu.


First select “Dyndns DDNS” from the “DDNS Type” Dropdown and check the “Enable” box next to it.

Now enter the following information:

Server IP:
Port: Do Not Change this. Unlike the HTTP Incoming Port, this should remain 80
Device Alias:
User Name: UserName1
Password: Password1

Select “Save” at the bottom of the page.

Step 4 – Port Forward your Router to your DVR.
OK, now you have configured your DVR to communicate with the DDNS server and keep it up to date with your current IP address.

The last thing we have to do is set up port forwarding in your router. Doing this tells the router that when a request comes in from “” on port “88”, to forward us to the DVR.

The user interface may vary depending on the specific router, but port forwarding is usually set up similar to this example. Here I am using a Linksys E1000 wireless router as shown below.


Most routers will have options for “Single Port Forwarding” and “Port Range Forwarding”.  In this example we will use “Single Port Forwarding”.

You may have noticed earlier, when we changed the “HTTP port” to “88” that there was also a “TCP port” set to “37777”.  We will need to port forward both of them. The HTTP port (88) is used by the “Web Service” when accessing the DVR from a browser, like Internet Explorer and the TCP port (37777) is used by software or mobile apps that will be accessing your DVR.

Once you find the area in your router for “Single Port Forwarding”, you will want to set things up similar to the settings shown above.

First, you will assign a descriptive name to each port forward. I used “DVR Web” for port”88” and “DVR Software” for port “37777”.

In the “External Port” and “Internal Port” fields you want to specify the port that the request will be coming in on “88” or “37777”.

Under the “Protocol” drop down there are usually 3 options, TCP, UDP and Both. We really only need to select “TCP” but selecting “Both” won’t hurt and covers all bases.

Now you need to tell the router the IP of the device you want to forward your request to. In this case it’s the DVR “”. That’s why earlier we mentioned we do not want to check the “DHCP” option, this will ensure that the DVR is always “”.

Last, you want to “Enable” or make sure this rule is “Active”.


Testing To See If Everything Works.
At this point if everything is setup correctly, you should be able to test it by launching “Internet Explorer” and going to the following domain:


If you get the “Web Service” login screen, then it’s all good!


One Last Note: Notice that we had to specify: 88 at the end of the domain name. This is because we change out HTTP port to 88. If we did not add: 88 the router would not know which rule to use to port forward our request. 



NAT and Port Forwarding Part 2

Written By:
Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

How do I know if I have Double NAT or Triple NAT?

In my last article we talked about NAT and what it does, and Port Forwarding and what that is. This article is the second in that series.
It should be easy enough to get your DVR/NVR up and accessible on the LAN (Local Area Network) by inputting a valid LAN address in the DVR/NVR setup. Now the question is – how do we make it accessible from off site. I mentioned in the previous article – while we were in the router, we should check for it’s ‘External IP Address’ to see what is showing there. This is usually in the ‘Status’ section or ‘WAN’ setup. Now you will need to know what you found there. The WAN or Internet status will tell us a couple of things.

1. Is it a static or dynamic address? If you see something like ‘DHCP’ / ‘Obtain Automatically’ / or you just can’t find an address anywhere, then most likely the address is dynamic. For Port Forwarding purposes, we don’t want anything to be dynamic unless it absolutely has to be. In a dynamic address scenario, your IP address can change, and then your Port Forwarding is broken. If your router shows ‘DHCP’ or ‘Obtain Address Automatically’ it may not show the address it has. This then, becomes a little tricky to figure out.

A good way to test for Double/Triple NAT, if you are comfortable working in the DOS Command prompt – run a ‘tracert’ command. (Trace Route) Trace route shows every node , or device that you pass through on your way to a certain web site. (Try it on your favorite web site sometime – you might be amazed at how far your signal travels to get to a site that is physically hosted only a few miles away) The first ‘hops’ it shows may reveal Internal Addresses replying. This is a clear indication of how many routers you are passing through on your way to the Internet. To run a trace route command – open the Command prompt and type “tracert” without the quotes, and be sure to leave a space between tracert and the www (you can use any site you want, I just always use Yahoo or Google). To open a command prompt – Press and hold the Windows ‘Flying Flag’ key between Ctrl and Alt on your keyboard – this will pop up a ‘Run’ dialog. Type “cmd” (without quotes) and click Enter. This will open your Command Prompt. Then just type in “tracert” (without quotes) Make sure to leave a space after ‘tracert’. That will return a series of IP Addresses similar to this =


As you can see, the first hop shows (Class C Internal Address) The second hop shows an address of (NOT an Internal Address) and it also shows Comcast information as well, confirming that it is an External Address. This shows me that I have only one router in line before I get to the Internet, so only single NAT on my system. If you see two or three hops showing an Internal Address, then you have Double or Triple NAT or Quadruple NAT or…? The point being, if you see more than one Internal Address, your task just became a little more difficult.

Another method, if you can do it without taking the customers business offline, unplug the Cat-5 cable coming in to the ‘WAN’ or ‘Internet’ port on your router, and plug directly in to your PC. Restart your PC, then run an ‘ipconfig /all’ command from a DOS prompt and check the IP Address you find there. (Try to connect to the Internet with a browser to verify you are getting a valid address when you test this way.) Hopefully you will see an ‘Internet Address’, then you know there is nothing else in line to worry about. If, however you see an ‘Internal Address’ Make a quick note of the IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway, and DNS Servers you see there – we can use them in the router you are connected to. As soon as you have the information you need, pull that cable and disconnect from the Internet. (It is risky to connect directly to the Internet so keep your test as brief as possible)

2. If you see the IP address is set to ‘Static’ in your router, you WILL be seeing an IP address. Check to see if that IP address is a ‘Private Range’ address =
Class A = through
Class B = through
Class C = through
When you see this on your WAN status (or WAN Address or Internet Address) –There is another device in line between you and the Internet that is performing NAT and you will have to Port Forward that device to the device you are looking at. To accomplish this you will need to set the router to a ‘Static’ address. The quick and dirty way is to take the IP address , Subnet mask, and Gateway that you discovered in the test above (connecting the routers’ WAN cable directly to your PC) and use them in the router you are working on. For DNS servers, use the ‘Gateway IP address’ or whatever you saw in the ipconfig test. (If you ran ‘ipconfig /all’ you will see DNS servers listed)
It is important to know that a modem with only a single LAN connection can also be a router. Even if it has only one port to connect to, it can be performing NAT and you’ll need to Port Forward it as well. (This is not usually the case on a cable connection – cable modems are generally set to ‘Bridge Mode’ so they are transparent on the network) This is where the ‘Status’ page of a router helps, if its WAN address is a private IP address, then your modem is also a router and it is supplying that address. Or , even more common, you will find another router in line between you and the Internet.

The easiest test here is to look for the ‘Gateway’ address showing on the WAN status. The gateway you see there will be the next router in line. Put in that address and see if you get a logon prompt. If you see another router, log into it and then run the same tests to see if it is directly connected to the Internet or not. Keep going until you no longer see private addresses on the router’s WAN connection. Start making a diagram of what you find and the different ranges of IP addresses you see on each one. You will need this information to map out your port forwarding. If you find only one router, you are golden – port forward it and call it done. If you find two or three routers in line – you are going to have to port forward every one of them.

Ports are forwarded directionally from the Internet toward your device.
The important thing to remember in Port Forwarding is that you must forward in ‘Daisy Chain’ fashion through all devices in your path.
Port Forward your ports from the modem to your first router – from your first  router to the next router – and so on until you get to the router where your device is connected. That last router will then be forwarded to your device.
**The most common mistake in port forwarding is to try to forward the first device in line directly to the camera or DVR IP Address instead of porting through the chain of devices.

Double NAT or Triple NAT can be tedious to set up because it takes extra time and you need to be sure of the connection sequence of your devices, and in some cases, you may find the customers network is not set up correctly. In my next article I will show you what to look for and how to fix it, as well as a detailed example of how to ‘Port Forward’ through a series of routers.
Happy Networking!

Previous Article in this series NAT and Port Forwarding Part 1


Getting Started With The Prime Line

Written By:
Monday, October 26th, 2015

prime-ip-networkThe Prime line of cameras, Network Video Recorders (NVRs) and Digital Video Recorders (DVRs) are now available at, so it’s time to learn how to get started with one of these new devices.  You will first need to get familiar with the Prime SADP tool that is designed to find NVRs, DVRs, and IP cameras connected to the same router as your Computer.


The Prime SADP tool will let you change the IP address of any device it finds, so you will want to match the network scheme that your router creates.  To figure out your network scheme, you will need to open a DOS prompt in Windows and type ipconfig or open a terminal in MAC and type ifconfig.  This should tell you the IP address of your computer and the Windows command will give you the gateway as well.  The gateway will generally be located at .1 like for example.  You could have a network that looks like that you may find with Comcast and other providers.  An IP camera and DVR will have a default password of 12345 for the admin account, but an NVR requires you to set it up with a monitor and mouse when you first turn it on.  Once you have a password created for your NVR, then you can use the SADP tool to change the network scheme.  Of course if you have a monitor and mouse, you can always change the network information directly in the NVR or DVR.

Take advantage of the Web Service


Once the DVR or NVR is on your network, you can access the web service with your computer to make changes.  Type the IP address in Internet Explorer and run the plugin file to set up the access.  It is good to add the website address to Compatibility View and allow for unsigned Active X downloads like you did with the Elite series of DVRs and NVRs.  Other browsers may work with the Prime series, but not all have been tested at this time.  The web service works different than the Elite series in the sense that only the plugin is needed for the video.  You should still be able to access the Configuration with browsers even if the video plugin will not install.  I was able to access the Configuration section in Chrome in Firefox, but not the video.  I have confirmation from MAC users that this web service will work natively on Safari.

Add a user right away

The most important thing to do first is to add Operator accounts for each person using the DVR or NVR.  Navigate to Configuration > User Management and add some users so you can have access from other accounts.


You can add all the permissions to make the account close to the admin level.  The Prime series has 3 predefined groups of admin, operator, and user which cannot be changed.  However, you can still customize each person by setting the permissions that you see fit.


The last thing that you would want to happen is to be logged out because everyone is using the main admin account.  Too many hands in the cookie jar can create a bad situation and having many accounts will be a proactive response for you to avoid that scenario.

It’s about time!

The next important setting we can address will be the time.  Navigate to Configuration > System Settings > Time Settings so that the time can be adjusted for your time zone.


If it is an NVR, we find that leaving the time zone set to +8:00 Beijing along with manual settings works the best with DST enabled.  Of course you can synchronize with your computer to get an immediate time change to your correct time, and there is a check box to make that happen after you hit save.  With Daylight Savings Time enabled, you need to set it to March 2nd through November 1st so it will change twice a year automatically.  The reason these settings work well for an NVR is that they are general settings that work best with ONVIF cameras.  Some NVR owners may mix ONVIF and private cameras, so these settings are also recommended for that type of setup.

If you plan to use NTP, make sure your server information is correct and check your GMT settings as well.  The Florida Greenwich Mean Time right now is -4:00 and California is -7:00 for example.  You need to have the correct GMT so every 60 minutes it will synchronize time with the server.  If you are using ONVIF cameras, this setting will not carry forward to the cameras as some features do not synchronize. With IP cameras, all encoding and settings are done at the camera level so they may need to be configured prior to plugging them into an NVR.

Adding Cameras

With a Tribrid DVR, analog or TVI cameras are plug and play.  If you have no video from TVI cameras, you may want to check your cabling or power.  Old existing cabling may not be good enough for TVI, so check with our sales team about the cost of RG59 Siamese cable since it will allow for the needed high quality video.

When it comes to adding IP cameras to an NVR or Tribrid, you have to navigate to Configuration > System > Camera Management.


In this section, you can Add, Modify, Delete, Quick Add, Custom Protocol, and Activation.  If you have an NVR with a built in POE switch, it will create a network.  Therefore, if you are setting up you cameras as static to connect to that network, you will need to set them to 192.168.254.X so they can be found by the internal switch.  The advantage to a built in switch is that video traffic will not reside on your main network, and should provide faster access without the congestion.

This concludes the getting started with the Prime Line guide.  If you need further assistance with the setup of your NVR or Tribrid, call our knowledgeable tech support team at 866-573-8878 option 3.



NAT and Port Forwarding

Written By:
Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

NAT and Port Forwarding
What is NAT and what does it do?
NAT is Network Address Translation. There are different types of NAT, but we’ll stick to the easy non-technical explanation of ‘Many to One’ NAT.
Your router is a Gateway, or ‘door’ to the Internet. There are two sides to the router, the External (WAN) side and the Internal (LAN) side.
Your computer should be connected on the inside (LAN) with an Internal or private address.
Your computer will only communicate with IP addresses that are on your same subnet. (Address range)
Everything on the outside of the router uses different IP addresses and Subnets – the router allows you to communicate with other devices in other subnets.
OK, so what does all of that mean?
Your computer can not communicate with another computer that does not have an address in the same ‘subnet’.
The router ‘translates’ different subnets for you, allowing you to communicate outside of your subnet.

NAT serves three main purposes =
1. Provides a type of firewall by hiding internal IP addresses.
Even though your computer shows an address of – when you browse the Internet – your address shows as something entirely different to any Internet computer.
Your routers’ External address is what shows up. This is also called ‘IP Masquerading’. This helps keep your computer ‘anonymous’ on the Internet.

2. Enables a company to use more internal IP addresses.
Since they’re used internally only, there’s no possibility of conflict with IP addresses used by other companies and organizations.
A company using a hundred computers or more only needs 1 Internet address. Internal address ranges are hidden from the public and are not part of the Internet address scheme.
This is where the term ‘Many to One’ comes from. Since the router is the only connection to the Internet, it’s address is the only one visible to the Internet. 100 or more computers using that router show up as 1 single address to the Internet (Many addresses to One address)

3. Allows a company to safely set up a device on the Internal Network for access from the Internet.
Using ‘Port Forwarding’ allows a company to set up Internet access to a device on the LAN. The porting guides the incoming signal to the correct device. The benefit of this is the Internet user sees only your ‘Public IP Address’ (your modem or router) and can not see your ‘Internal IP Address’ so they have no direct access to the device other than through the software they are using to access it. (IP Masquerading again)
So, in a nutshell – NAT allows you to ‘see’ other IP Subnets while keeping you anonymous to those other networks.
Now you have a very basic understanding of what NAT is and does, and hopefully, you already know how to set an IP Address on your LAN so your device can communicate.
So how do you set it up to be accessed from the Internet? This is where ‘Port Forwarding’ comes into our picture.
When you are accessing your device from a remote location, in 99% of all instances, you will actually be accessing the router or modem. The router then guides your incoming signal to the correct device on your LAN. The only exception to this rule will be when your device is set with an Internet IP Address and exposed directly to the Internet. This is always risky – and this is why Internet Security companies make the big bucks. Putting a Windows based computer directly on the Internet with no protection is an open invitation to bad things happening, and bad things WILL happen within a very short time. We tested a PC connected to the Internet with an External address – in 45 SECONDS we had been infected with SQL Slammer virus. (This PC was running Microsoft SQL with listening ports set to defaults) So protecting your computer from the Internet is important, to say the least. This is why you need a router to ‘mask’ your computer and hide it.

So, how does your remote query to end up connecting you to a device with an address of The answer is ‘Port Forwarding’. My favorite analogy to describe a router is to think of it as a Hotel. The Hotel has a ‘Street Address’ – the same as your routers ‘Internet Address’ The rooms in the Hotel all have different numbers – the same as computers on your LAN.
When you send mail to the Hotel, you send it to the ‘Street Address’ of the Hotel. If you don’t have a room number or customer name – the Hotel does not know where to send that incoming mail. You can’t add an Internal IP Address (room number) to an Internet query, so you’ll need some other kind of information for the router to direct your incoming signal. Ports provide that extra information for your router.
Setting up Port Forwarding is pretty easy when you have all the necessary information.
You will need the IP address of the Router to access it for programming.
You will need the IP address of the device you are forwarding to.
You will need the port numbers required by the software.
The hard part is figuring out where to go on the router to get it set up. You will find that different models of routers sometimes use completely different terminology for the same thing. To set up port forwarding on your router, look for ‘Advanced Configuration’, ‘DHCP’, ‘NAT’, ‘Applications and Gaming’, ‘Virtual Servers’ or ‘Pinholes’ depending on the router model and manufacturer.
Sometimes they actually call it ‘Port Forwarding’, but you’ll usually find it hidden in one of those other sections.

On a Linksys router – look under ‘Applications and Gaming’

Here you can see the information requested –
Application = call it what ever you want, but use something descriptive in case you have to come back for a service call a year later.
Start = The starting port or lowest number port in a range.
End = The ending port or highest number port in a range.
(If you are only forwarding two ports, 80 and 37777 for instance, then create two entries instead of a range – Start Port = 80 / End Port = 80 for the first one and Start Port = 37777 / End port = 37777 for the second one. Avoid using a range when the port numbers are so far apart. In this case entering a range of Start Port = 80 / End Port = 37777 would work, BUT you would be opening over 37000 ports. That is a security breach just waiting to happen.
IP Address = the Internal IP address of your device.
Enabled = Turn it on !
Save = Always look around for a ‘Save’ or ‘Apply’ button – if you forget or miss it – the router may ‘dump’ all your hard work and you’ll have to do it all again..
While you are logged in to the router, try to find the WAN status or Internet Address. This will tell you if you are connected directly to the Internet or if you are routing through another device, such as another router or a modem that is also routing. (A modem with only one network port can still be a router, handing out a private address range.)
If you see an address there that falls into the “Private” range of addresses, then there is another device between your router and the Internet performing NAT and you’ll need to Port Forward that device as well. When you have more than one router to pass through before you get to the Internet, then you also have a situation called Double NAT or Triple NAT, where each router is translating for it’s unique subnet. When you have a double or triple NAT situation, then you also have to do double or triple port forwarding to route your incoming signal back to your device.
In my next article, I will show you how to discover Double NAT and Triple NAT situations, and how to map your way through them to establish Port Forwarding. Happy Networking!

Check out the 2nd Article in the Series NAT and Port Forwarding Part 2



Pan, Tilt, Zoom (PTZ) Cameras Explained

Written By:
Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

Since there are a lot of Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Cameras available, I will explain in this article on how to best choose the correct PTZ for your Security Camera Installation.

I will start by showing the different parts of a PTZ camera.

1. Parts of a PTZ camera

(a) Housing – Usually composed of an aluminum bell shaped cover (image 1) or some models have abs plastic housings (images 2,3)

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

aluminium ptz housing plasticdome,jpg plasticdome2,jpg

(b) Camera module
This is where the image CCD sensor, optical lens, and the motors that control Zoom and Focus are located.

Camera Module

(c) PTZ control board
The PTZ control board processes RS485 data  that converts it into mechanical movements.

PTZ Control Board

Note: On this particular PTZ control board it has dip switches (the red block with white switches). This allows you to change the protocol and ID of the camera. Some of our cameras are configured via the OSD (On Screen Display) menu.

(d) PTZ motors – are the small motors that allow the camera to perform up, down, left and right functions. Marked by the arrows are two step motors; the one to the top controls up and down movements and the one at the bottom controls left and right movements (Image 1).

Note: The motors used on a PTZ camera are known as step motors which use steps (teeth) that allow a more precise movement vs. standard electromagnetic motors that require higher RPM’S and torque. Below are the two animated examples of an electromagnetic motor (image 2) and step motor (image 3).

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

camera motors2 electric motor animation 1 StepperMotor1

(e) PTZ Pigtail – is the cable that comes out of the camera which allows you to connect power, video, network, audio and alarms.

The Standard size IPPTZ cameras have alarm, audio, analog BNC out and an RJ45 jack (image 1). Mini-IPPTZ do not have an analog out option.

Our analog PTZ cameras have rs485, ground, BNC analog out and DC power plug (image 2)

Image 1

Image 2

ipptz-connection ptz-analog

Note: RS485 is a simple protocol used for communication between two or more devices. The nature of RS-485 allows transmission of  PTZ data along side power or in electrically noisy environment without interference. It has been tested to work at 1600 ft. on CAT6e cable.

2. Technologies

Currently our PTZs  come in three different technologies

1. Analog

2. IP


(a) Camera cable run limitations and options to extend if necessary

Analog has a 1000 ft. Video and RS485 Range but can only be powered up to 150 ft. before voltage drop. Two ways you can counter the power limitation is by:

1. Having power at the camera
2. Using a power supply with a higher amperage rating. An example of that would be if your camera is rated at 500 ma and your run is over 150 ft – use a 2-5 amp power supply. Although theoretically it should work we do not recommend exceeding the 150 ft. limit

IP has a 300 ft. limit due to standard networking limitation. Since power, video and RS485 can be run on a single CAT6e cable there is no way to increase the range without additional equipment. In the event you have to exceed the 300 ft limit you can use a POE injector that allows you to extend an additional 300 ft.

HD-CVI has 1600 ft. video and RS485 limit.  You can use CAT6e for both the RS485 and Video; for the video you will need video baluns to allow 1600 ft. range. The power has the same limitation as the analog cameras and will required local power or a higher rated 12v 2-5 amps depending on the camera requirements.

(b) Video quality and Resolutions

Analog – Our analog  cameras come with 700 TVL

IP – Range from  1.3 Mega Pixel, 2 Mega Pixel, and 3 Mega Pixel

HD-CVI – Currently only supports 1 Mega Pixel (720P)

(c) What are  differences between IP, analog + HD-CVI

1. An analog camera has to be physically connected into the DVR to record video and has a limitation of 1000ft.

An IP camera does not have to connect directly to an NVR. Simply by configuring some the network you can access your camera anywhere in the world. Let’s say your camera is in California and your NVR ( Network Video Recorder) is in New York. You can actually record the video from that camera at your New York location. This type of setup is used frequently by government and cities to monitor remote cameras.

2. Both the IP and HD-CVI support HD resolution, 720P and 1080P, whereas the analog only supports D1 resolution at 700 TVL

Note: The higher the resolution of a camera, the larger the images. It allows for wider coverage areas and more details vs the analog resolution. Because the images are larger on higher resolutions its better suited to use the digital zoom to get a closer look at an object.

3. Mini and Standard size cameras

Two of the major differences between our mini and standard sized PTZ cameras is the size of the housing and the optical lens capacities. The mini cameras are more aesthetically appealing in smaller homes and offices. The larger housings are better suited for larger homes and commercial applications.


Standard Size PTZ

4. Camera modules

(a) The camera module houses what is called the CCD or CMOS board (image 1), lens and motors that allow fine adjustments of zoom + focus (image 2).

Image 1 – CCD OR CMOS board

Image 2 – PTZ lens with control motors

ccdboard ptz lens

(b) Image Sensor – captures light and converts it into a digital image that can be stored onto the DVR/NVR. Currently there are two different types of sensors, CCD and CMOS. There isn’t much difference as far as image quality, but the CMOS sensors are known to handle brighter than normal scenarios extremely well. The CCD sensors were designed for IR applications where cut filters and automatic shutters are used. But in the past few years with advancement in technology, cameras now offer WDR (Wide Dynamic Range) and IR cut filters (Infrared Cut filters) which allows digital and mechanical adjustment for your specific setup. So it doesn’t matter if your using a CMOS or CCD as your end results are of high quality.

CCD Sensor

CMOS Sensor

CCD cmos

(c) Optical lens – Allows for adjustment of zoom or focus. When you zoom in, the lens moves closer to the image senor so the image becomes larger. When you zoom out the lens moves away from the image sensor which make the image small and results in a wider view.  When referring to 12x zoom on lets say our PTZ-LX700L12X mini it means it can zoom in 12 times the normal amount. Generally you can find out what the range on the lens is by multiplying the lens size by the times zoom. So in our PTZ-LX-700L12X you can multiply 5×12=60. Five being the lens size multiplied by zoom gives you maximum mm size of 60 mm. In this case this camera has a varifocal range of 5-60mm

Here is an example of our 23x PTZ camera. The approximate distance from the camera to the truck is 380ft.

6. Mounting options

PTZ cameras are designed to rotate a full 360 degree there for an arm mount (image 2), pendulum mount (image 3) or ceiling mount bracket (image 1) is used for mounting the cameras.

Ceiling mounts- A ceiling mounting is great for any application that requires a PTZ camera but with a low profile. The better half of the camera goes into any surface and has a clip mechanism to secure it. Only the dome will be visible for a aesthetically appealing look.

Arm mount- Are designed to mount a vertical plane or post. Generally this camera serves as a deterrence as it protrudes from where its mounted

Pendant mount- are designed to hang  from a horizontal surface such as ceiling, post.

 In ceiling mount   Arm mount  Pendant mount
plasticdome2,jpg 700tvl-12x-indoor-outdoor-pan-tilt-zoom-security-camera-59056big pr59195img4sma

7. Wiring PTZ cameras 

(a) Wiring RS485 for Analog PTZ cameras

There are two ways you can successfully wire PTZ cameras 1. Daisy chain  2. Star or direct connection

 Daisy Chain connection

  Star or Direct connection

multiple ptz connection daisy chain multiple ptz connection

Note: Recommended cable CAT6e but CAT5e works fine as well. Use a single pair ex: solid blue and white/ blue, use the solid blue as the positive and the white/blue as the negative.

The main difference between daisy chaining or direct connection is on a daisy chain the cameras rely on each other. So if one fails the ones that follow the failed camera will not work. On a direct connection the cable is ran directly from each camera to the controller or DVR. I normally splice in a 2-3 ft. cable to make it easier to connect. If a camera fails none of the other cameras are affected and continue to operate as normal.