Archive for the ‘ HowTo Articles ’ Category



Splitting Your HDMI Signal

Written By:
Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

hdmi splitters

 

There are a multitude of reasons one might want to split a video signal from their Digital Video Recorder or Network Video Recorder: from being able to view it in multiple rooms in your house, to showing your camera view above a point of sale to alert customers of surveillance. Regardless of the reason, you may find that you run out of usable video ports on your DVR/NVR so when looking to view these multiple images, what are you real options? With the advances in technology, HDMI has become the premier format, as such it has become the main video output on most of our DVRs and NVRs. So what are your built in options with our products? What are your alternatives? What are the limitations? What can we recommend?

Spot Outs

So first there are a few options to consider. Are you looking to use this monitor for a point of sale or some place at your business where its viewable to the public. If you are making it viewable to the public then you may want to seriously consider a DVR/NVR with a spot out. A spot out is a monitor connection that shows cameras in sequence that differs from the main display in that it does not reveal all the cameras recording on DVR/NVR. This is extremely beneficial when we talk about privacy and security. If you wish to utilize one of these spot outs I recommend our full-size units which provides you with this option in addition a larger amount of inputs and extra SATA slots for potentially longer recording times. But what if you want to show this spot out to multiple points of sale or other locations around your business? This leads us to our alternative solutions.

(below I have linked a few of these models with spot outs for your convenience)

DVRS

http://www.securitycameraking.com/16-channel-hybrid-federal-series-60050-prd1.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/16-channel-full-size-cvi-60020-prd1.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/16-channel-tribrid-cvi-ip-60019-prd1.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/32-channel-compact-series-hd-60059-prd1.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/32-channel-elite-compact-series-59510-prd1.html

NVRS

http://www.securitycameraking.com/32-channel-elite-series-2u-60155-prd1.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/NVR-ELE32-4K.html

http://www.securitycameraking.com/64-channel-4k-hot-swap-60136-prd1.html

 

Splitting Your HDMI Signal with HDMI Splitters

So what if you have one of these DVR’s/NVR’s and still need to split the signal to multiple locations? What if you are looking to split the regular video matrix to be viewed by multiple monitors/TVs around your home. What are your options then? Well that’s where HDMI splitters can come in handy.  They allow you the unique ability to split the signal to two different cables or more depending on the splitter. There are two main kinds of splitters, passive and active.  Passive splitters will work fine for a small split like 1 to 2 way splitter but if your runs between different locations are significant distances 25-50 feet or more it is recommended that you go with an active solution as this allows for greater distance between each location. Additionally, you can use active splitters to split your signal to even more than just two locations allowing you greater distances and the option of running an HDMI anywhere in your home or business.

Unfortunately there are some limitations to this and they are worth noting and considering depending on what situation you’re likely to encounter. For example, the viability, performance, and compatibility can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and unfortunately as we do not currently carry any of these units I cannot particularly recommend any specifics but I can show you a video of a passive splitter I tested to provide an example of just how beneficial this technology can be. Moreover, you can see just how simple a passive HDMI splitter is to use. There is however one additional thing you should consider and that is that you cannot split them over and over, that is to say they cannot be daisy chained like other devices often are. Lastly, among the most important limitations is that the aspect ratios and capabilities of the splitter need to match the settings you’ve chose on your DVR/NVR and the television or monitor. The primary concern is the television and monitor, just as the DVR/NVR, is somewhat flexible. For example, if you are looking to use one of our 4k NVRs or DVRs you should also utilize a splitter capable of handling this on a TV or monitor capable of viewing this resolution or it will be somewhat counterproductive.

In closing, I would like to leave you with a few recommendations. First is that a full size unit and a spot out are always preferred when in a sales or business environment. This is to protect assets with the knowledge that information is a key part of security and providing a potential vulnerability to the public is almost never beneficial. Second that you carefully weigh the risk reward of passive and active HDMI splitters before finalizing your decision because it’s frustrating when you find a part doesn’t work the way you want it to. The third and final recommendation is that you make sure to check the capabilities of the device you purchase against your monitors and TVs to make sure they are compatible.

So what can you take away from all this? Well, hopefully that an HDMI splitter is a worthwhile piece of equipment that can be utilized in a variety of situations to help you take full advantage of our surveillance equipment and expand your camera layout to be viewable throughout your home or business, offering you an even more customized security solution. If you have any questions about our DVRs or NVRs and video outputs please give our knowledgeable sales staff a call at 866-573-8878. And if you’ve already purchased and are seeking support for your system remember all our products come with a lifetime supply of tech support and our experienced staff is as always here for you.

 

For your convenience here is the aforementioned video. Please bear in mind this is only one option when utilizing an HDMI splitter and there are a variety of products for various situations. Hopefully I’ve helped you get better insight into the possibilities and capabilities of both HDMI splitters and our systems in general. Please feel free to like and share this video with friends or coworkers.

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Placing Elite IP Cameras on the channel you want with an Elite system that has a built in POE switch

Written By:
Friday, December 18th, 2015

placing elite IP cameras

One of the big problems that people call in about is that they have trouble placing elite IP cameras to the desired channel. People are expressing interest in seeing the cameras in a specific order for various reasons. Perhaps you want your indoor cameras as the first block, and then your outdoor cameras. Perhaps you want your front door and counter in a business to be set to channel 1 and channel 2. Or perhaps you just want to order your cameras by importance to you. No need to worry, this article will cover how to get this done.

The reason this is difficult is that analog systems have been plug and play for years and networking IP cameras is all about the numbers. This Elite system with a built in POE switch was designed to be a plug and play option for people that do not want to put any thought into it. When you plug in an Elite camera into the POE switch, it automatically takes an IP address that is given by the switch. The built int POE switch acts as a DHCP server, so any cameras set to DHCP will receive an IP address. The default gateway address for Elite series Network Video Recorders’ Switch is 10.1.1.1. If you would like to change this network range, look for a section labeled Switch in the Networking area of the menu. This DHCP option is problematic at times because of a memory effect that has been created from the first time you plug in a camera. Since you are supposed to plug in cameras one by one, they will appear on the channel in the order that you connect them. The port number on the back of the NVR means nothing. It does not represent where you will see the camera on your TV or monitor. With IP based systems, it is all about the numbers.

Static IP addresses for cameras is always the best option

If you want your cameras to go exactly where you want, you need to set all cameras to static IP addresses. This will allow you to add them in the exact order you like. The first thing you need to do is find the cameras. The EL cameras require the EL camera finder utility, also known as the Config Tool. The Config Tool will allow you to change the IP address and network information in the camera. The problem is that the camera needs power on the same network that your computer with the config tool is connected to.

placing elite IP cameras 1

If you plan to use a 12V power supply to set up the camera, that is the best option. You can put the camera on your main network TEMPORARILY while you log into the web service of the camera and change any settings that you want. Since IP camera settings are done at the camera level, this may be a good choice. With Elite cameras and Elite NVRs, majority of the settings should synchronize and be accessible at the NVR. This is not true with ONVIF cameras. Your second option for putting your computer on the same network as the camera is to plug the camera and computer into the POE switch. Your computer and camera will get a 10.1.1.x IP address, so you will be able to access the camera through the config tool and change it to a static number of your choosing. This does work, but I always worry about the camera getting that first dynamic address the second you plug it in. Most of the problems occur when people plug in all their cameras at once and they all get Dynamic IP assignments. I have found that even though it gets a dynamic IP address and a Channel 1 assignment, it is replaced by your static IP address when you remove all cameras that are automatically added and add your camera manually.

Adding Cameras Manually

The final step in adding your camera to the POE switch by using a manually add button. Lets say you decided to start at 10.1.1.10 in your numbering convention. This is where you will push the Manually Add button at the bottom of the remote devices or add a camera section. Do not push the Refresh button or Device Search button. The names of the section can depend on the Web Service version, model number, or interface directly at the NVR. When you set up your camera in the manually add screen, you can choose the exact channel where you want to put it. This is the only way you get to choose the channel. Otherwise, you can add cameras in the order that you choose by using the device search button, selecting the camera, and clicking the add button. This method will place all cameras in the first available channel. So if you are numbering your cameras 10.1.1.10, 10.1.1.11, 10.1.1.12, and so on, you can select one and add one at a time only, and it will get the first available channel. In this case, 10.1.1.10 will get channel 1 since this is our first camera.  Then when you set up your second camera at 10.1.1.11 and hit the device search button, you will be able to automatically add it to channel 2.

placing elite IP cameras 2

In Summary

If you are starting from scratch, this article will help you get to where you need to be.  If you are trying to fix a current NVR, you need to unplug all cameras, default the camera section, then reboot.  Then you will be able to start over.  IP cameras are all about the numbers, so taking control of the numbers will be your best option. If you want a plug and play option with the built in POE switch, then it will work that way by assigning IP addresses. However, the order will be random if they are all connected at the same time, or based on the order that they are plugged in with a non-sequential number scheme. While most people do not care about the numbers that the cameras have, I have found that the static option works the best and that people with problems usually have them set up dynamically. Take control of your cameras and set them up so those numbers do not change. The extra work is a one shot deal and will save you future aggravation.

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NAT and Port Forwarding Part 3

Written By:
Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

This will be the third and final installment of the NAT and Port Forwarding series. It is my hope that these articles will help you gain an overview of networking that allows you to walk into any situation and be able to figure out what the problem is quickly, and know what to do to fix it. Networking is not really difficult when you know some ‘basics’, or rules that must be followed every time. Once you have those tools at your disposal, identifying and fixing issues becomes a LOT easier. In the last article we learned how to discover Double NAT and Triple NAT by using the ‘tracert’ command. We have discovered that we are passing through three routers on our way to the Internet. So now, we need to map our way from the Internet back to our device using Port Forwarding rules to guide our incoming signal.
First rule of multiple routers – Every router MUST have a unique Network ID. The network ID is usually the first three octets in your IP Address, depending on the Subnet Mask. Lets assume that we have just a ‘standard’ setup on each router, where the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. That mask means your first three octets in the IP address for everything connected to that router must match. Only the last number must be unique. So if your router’s Internal Address is 192.168.1.1, everything on the router must be addressed 192.168.1.xxx. (Where xxx= 001 through 255). The next router in line MUST have a different Network ID. It can be a simple as changing one number in the third octet = 192.168.2.xxx, or it can be completely different = 10.10.10.xxx. The rule being merely, they must be different. So if you run a ‘tracert’ (trace route) command and see replies from our routers, if any of them show the same network ID, then we have to change one of them to a unique ID. The reason for this is, using as example 192.168.1.1 on the first router, if your next router also has 192.168.1.1 as an address, that is called an IP Address Conflict. With 192.168.1.xxx as your IP range, you are limited by that network ID to 254 other devices that your computer can talk to. One of those other 254 devices needs to be a Gateway (router) so you can see other address ranges. (like Internet Addresses) That is called NAT (Network Address Translation) and since your router is doing that NAT, it allows you to see through to the next router, and everything connected to it. That gives you 254 more devices with the same address as the ones on the first router, hence the Network IP Address Conflict.  Think of the Highlander series where Duncan MacLeod says “There can be only one!” Routers always have a ‘LAN Setup’ where you set the Internal Address of the router – that address determines the Network ID of the LAN.
Here is an example of two routers in line behind a modem/router with a camera attached to the last router.
tripleNAT
Notice that each router has a unique Network ID =
Modem LAN   = 192.168.1.1
Router 1 LAN = 192.168.2.1
Router 2 LAN = 192.168.3.1
IP Camera is on the third router with an IP address of 192.168.3.2 and uses 3 ports = 3301, 3302, 3303.

To Port Forward your connection to the camera =
First make sure you set each router with a WAN (Internet IP or External IP) that works on the next router’s LAN  (Internal Range)
Set the address as ‘Static’ so it never changes. Look closely at the image above – see Router 2.
Router 2’s LAN (Internal IP) is set to 192.168.3.xxx and the camera is attached to that side of the router with a 192.168.3.xxx.address.
Router 2’s WAN (External IP) is set to 192.168.2.2 and is attached to Router 1’s LAN.
Router 1’s LAN is set to 192.168.2.xxx so router 2 can connect to it’s LAN.
Router 1’s WAN is set to 192.168.1.2 so it will connect to the Modem/Router’s LAN.
The Modem/Router’s LAN is set to 192.168.1.xxx
The Modem/Router’s WAN is the Internet Address you will use to connect to the camera.
When all three routers are set up correctly with unique subnet IDs, a PC connected to the same router as the camera will be able to connect to router 2, router 1, and the Modem/router using the LAN address of each device. (Example = open a browser and input 192.168.2.1 = Router 1 should respond with a logon prompt. Enter 192.168.1.1 and the Modem/Router should respond)
When you can connect to every device in line, and get past them to the Internet – you are ready to Port Forward them back to your camera.
Port Forwarding works from the Internet inward to your camera. That is why it is called ‘Forwarding’, it forwards your ‘call’ from the Internet to device to device until it gets to your camera.
To Port Forward the camera in the example above – log on to the Modem/Router first, using 192.168.1.1 (The Modems LAN address).
Find the Port Forwarding section of the Modem Router. (It may be hiding under ‘Security’, Advanced Settings’, ‘Firewall’, Virtual Servers’, Applications and Gaming’, ‘Pinholes’ or other sections)
In the Modem/Router = forward the ports 3301, 3302, 3303 to 192.168.1.2 (The WAN Address of Router 1) Save your settings.
Log on to Router 1 using 192.168.2.1 (Router 1’s LAN address) Forward the same 3 ports to 192.168.2.2 (The WAN Address of Router 2) Save your settings.
Log on to Router 2 using 192.168.3.1 (Router 2’s LAN address)
Forward the same 3 ports to 192.168.3.2 (The camera’s IP address on router 2) Save your settings.
You can see here that the Port Forwarding must be done in ‘Daisy Chain’ fashion from router to router to router, and finally to the camera.
When you have successfully set up Port Forwarding through all three routers – open a web browser and go to www.canyouseeme.org . This website will show you your Internet Address – this is the address you will use from off site to connect to the camera, your Port Forwarding will guide your query through the routers and connect you to the camera. This web site also has a very handy ‘Port Checker’ tool. Put in the port number you want to check and click ‘Test’. If you have forwarded correctly, the test will succeed.
**Note that the test on this site only works for TCP ports. If your camera uses UDP ports, the tool will return a ‘Fail’. If you get a ‘Fail’ on TCP port checking, you will need to double check all your forwarding rules in each router. If all settings look correct – reboot the routers and test again with the port check tool. Routers usually need to ‘reset’ when opening ports, and most inexpensive routers present the message  ‘The router needs to restart’ or similar, and then do a ‘soft’ reboot that fails to accomplish the task.
Also, when checking the ports, make sure your camera is powered up and running and connected to the network so the test can ‘resolve’ or it will fail every time.

To sum up what you did here =
You found three routers daisy chained between you and the Internet by using the ‘tracert’ command.
You identified a private IP range (Network ID) on each router’s LAN that is unique to each router.
You set a static address on the WAN of each sub-router that works in the LAN of the router it is attached to.
You forwarded the required ports from the Modem/Router to the second router, from there to the third router, and from there to your camera.
Then you tested connectivity by going to www.canyouseeme.org and checking your ports.
Those five things are all you need to do to ensure off site connection to your device.
Now that you are a virtual ‘Networking Dynamo’ go out there give it a go! If you run into trouble, never fear, you have the best technical support available anywhere ready to help you out.
Happy Networking!

 

 

 

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A Guide for License plate cameras

Written By:
Tuesday, November 10th, 2015

License plate cameras, why do we need them!? Well…..self-explanatory, to record license plates. Since a vehicle tag is a very valuable piece of information in any criminal investigation, it is understandable why private and commercial customers would want to implement a device that records it as part of their security system. Now, some of you will say “Why can’t I just use a regular high resolution camera. It can obviously record a vehicle tag from a distance?!” Well…. it’s not that simple! The license plate cameras have certain unique features that classify them as license plate cameras.

_3503006

Before I go into those unique features, a quick class in basic videography is needed.

The key of any video scene is the light that affects any video footage that we are recording.  Before the camera records a certain scene, there is an automatic process that is done by the cameras internal mechanism. The sensor calculates the existing conditions like the colors, amount of light, differences between highlights and shadows at the scenery and configures the camera’s shutter and iris to an average configuration that was programmed by the manufacturer. The shutter and the iris both are responsible for the amount of light that enters the camera by controlling its speed and opening. The faster the shutter works, the less light is caught by the sensor. The larger iris opening will let more light in. By default, this process is automated by a camera’s processor.

wpid-leaf-shutter-lens-images-04-2013-01-9-00-55

Going back to our case…… maybe this average setup is good for general video recording but it is not good enough if we need to record something very specific like a vehicle’s license plate. Besides that, there is another problem. We know that an average CCTV camera has IR illuminators that turn on as soon as it becomes dark at the scene and the camera switches to infra-red mode so the IRs can illuminate the dark scene. That does not help us since the license plate that we want to catch is reflective as required by law and the light reflects back into the camera and distorts the video/image.

close-full

So we need an ability to record the tag in any light conditions, day or night. That’s where the specialized license plate cameras come in. These cameras have  options that are designed to help solve issues that were mentioned earlier. The controls can be manipulated by the user manually and to the point that is desired by the user and to his needs. A good license plate camera will have all or some of these options:

  1. Manual shutter
  2. Manual iris
  3. Option to turn off the cameras IR mode
  4. Varifocal lens
  5. Manual focus

You’re wondering why we need those manual adjustments and how can we use them? We are going to use those manual adjustments to record the piece of information that is important for us, the vehicle tag. In the beginning, there’s a very important part of the installation and that’s the positioning of the camera. It is obvious that the installer needs to install the camera in a way that the vehicle’s license plate will be visible at a certain point by that camera or pass through the scene that the camera is viewing. This will be done by using proper focus, varifocal lens and axis movements that the camera has. In the second phase of the installation, we need to make sure that we configure the camera in a way that it will record the tag by using manual adjustments like shutter, iris or both.

gv_lpc_daynight

Security Camera King currently sells 2 different models of license plate cameras. These cameras have the abilities that were described earlier in this article and can be used successfully to record vehicle tags. The second part of this article will guide you through how to set up these cameras as license plate cameras.

CVIOB-TP2IR550B

This camera is from our TP series of cameras and it is a CVI camera. This camera is a long range, varifocal, weatherproof camera that can work as a license plate camera. It has all the necessary features that will make it a license plate camera and here are the adjustments that need to be made.

Start working with the camera by viewing the camera full screen on your DVR. Click the right mouse to bring up a menu and choose ‘PTZ’. Click again on the small arrow that is located on the right side of this menu and another menu will open. Click on the camera icon in the upper right corner and this will bring up the OSD menu.

20151015_092225_HDR

Use the arrows on the menu to go to ‘Exposure’ and click ‘Enter’ to choose it. In the ‘Exposure’ menu choose ‘Shutter’ and the next menu will allow you to manually adjust the shutter. There are no exact settings that the shutter will need to be set at. It’s all trial and error so you will need to play with it so you can find the right adjustment.

20151015_092355_HDR 20151015_092505_HDR

Go back to the ‘Main Menu’ and choose ‘Day & Night’. Click on the right arrow of the menu to change it to ‘Color’.

20151015_092720_HDR

The last adjustment should be the intensity of your IR illuminators. On the bottom part of the camera there is a cover that covers the knob that controls that adjustment. Turn the knob to the minimum so the IR illuminators will not interfere with the license plate light.

IPOB-TP2MP250L660-W

This camera is also from our TP series and it is an IP camera. Similar to the previous camera, this camera is also a long range, varifocal, weatherproof camera that can work as a license plate camera.

You will need to log into the web-interface of the IP camera to setup the necessary adjustments. Once there you will find ‘Video Settings’ on the Main Menu and click it. Choose ‘Video Parameters” and then go to tab “Advanced”. Change the ‘Exposure Time’ to a higher value to close the shutter on the camera. Again, this will be a trial and error method. You need to try so you can find the right adjustment.

Capture24524

Choose the ‘IR’ tab and change the ‘IR mode’ to ‘Time Detection’. Then change the time to 0:0:0 a day to 23:59:59 a night. The ‘IR’ should be changed to ‘Low Level’ and you are all done.

Capturedfgbhxdfgh

Remember, a license plate camera by itself is not sufficient. As a license plate capture solution it would be wise to pair it up with more cameras that would have an overall view of the general scene.

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Prevent tampering on your new TechPro Security Recorders & Lock Boxes.

Written By:
Friday, November 6th, 2015

lockbox lockpicking

Prevent tampering on your new TechPro Security Recorders & Lock Boxes. There are times that a bit of security for your security equipment is needed more than the normal Lockbox or locked room, these can be easily accessed by someone with lock picking skills or having access to bypassing tools to gain access to these devices. In these cases they can alter or damage the equipment in order to do their nefarious acts. For this I have a simple solution that will provide you with alerts via email, audible alerts from the built in recorder and/or an external alarm connected to one of the relays built into many of our recorders.

Lets start by gathering what we need.

We first need the Micro Switch that will be used to trigger the signal.

02750017_00

 

We also need screws (Check Size for best fitment) I used the nut and bolt solution.

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Here is Duct Strip for mounting the sensor in the best spot you can find.

duct-hanger-strap-

We will also use 18 AWG cable.  500ft-18-2-awg-power-wiresecurity-camera-cable-discount-58884sma

Now the position of the sensor depends on the recorder itself. We carry a variety of options to choose from and one is the Prime Series that has a lid that needs to be slid back to remove the top and vice versa when locking it, this is why we are utilizing the Micro Switch with a roller so that the roller helps with the lids movement without causing any harm to the lid or the switch itself.

 

Locking the recorder with a sliding Lid.

Unlocking the recorder with a sliding lid.

Once we have found the perfect position so that the roller and the lid have enough clearance and no other parts are touching, we can move on to choosing what type of circuit we will be using. You can choose a normally open or normally closed circuit. For our purpose I suggest a normally closed circuit. This way, if the leads that are going back to the input/output are cut or tampered with, the circuit will open and send an audible alert or an email if you choose to receive them.

Microswitch

This is an image of an older project with the same switch. This is what we are going to do but in this case we will have one of the leads on the normally closed pin instead of the normally open pin like this image illustrates. microswitch diagram

Micro switches are very popular. It basically has a common connection and a N.O and an N.C that send the voltage from one pin to the other with the mechanical input of the arm which in our case has the roller ball attached to it.

IMG_9027

In the above image we can see what terminals I will be using for this demonstration. The black lead is going to the ground/common and the red lead is going to input number 16.

We run the leads as best as possible into the case of the recorder, there are many holes you can choose from. If you choose to, you can make a better connection inside of the unit by soldering the leads to the common and input of your choice. Ensure that the terminal block has these blocked by either filling the block with epoxy or simply cutting the block itself.

IMG_9032
Here are some images where you can mount the micro switch on a CVI Recorder , now I utilized some 3m double sided tape just for this demonstration. If I were to add this I would counter sink the hole that already exists there adding a piece of strap to that, connect the strap to that hole with an angled screw so as to not interfere with the lid and then add the micro switch to it.

IMG_9040

Here you can see the clearance of the switch with the lid.

In this video you will see the switch in action. I am doing some steps before turning the recorder and ensuring none of my test leads are touching the case . I used an LED flashlight I got for free when I purchased the micro-switch at Radioshack since the ones I ordered online were delayed and there was an immediate need for these.

 

 

IMG_9045

We can do the same with a lock box as shown here.

Now that we have the recorder working with this setup , we need to configure the recorder so it sends us an email, beeps and operates a siren if you choose to add it. In the case of the lock box you can mount the strip to the top lid as the side lid is the first thing that needs to be opened.

 

 

IMG_9028

I had to switch to an analog recorder since I was not able to make any changes to the other without changing what was there already. For any other recorder it is similar to this Go to the ALARM section and under “Event Type” select “Local Alarm” and check the box with the label “Enable”. Next, select the number of “Alarm in”, in this case we are setting it to 16 and we are just looking for a beep to ensure it was functioning.

For Email, check the box labeled “Show Message” and then check “Send Email”.

For Snapshot (saves an image from the camera that is near the recorder) make sure you select the correct channel here.

Buzzer, will enable the internal buzzer. (not as loud as you would think)

Alarm Out, this is where you can add the rule where a siren can be installed. When using this, add the siren and use the common and other to the 1,2,3 outputs. (This will turn on the siren when the micro switch is triggered)

Save this and you are all set unless you want an email. In this case you will need to do the following:

IMG_9029

 

On the bottom of the NETWORK page you must pick EMAIL to enable Email, and  then double click on the word “EMAIL” and this will bring up another window where you can add your settings for email output.

 

IMG_9030

 

In my case I am using the Gmail Servers. Make sure you select Port 465, add your username and password, and select SSL Encryption. Everything else is self explanatory. Once the recorder is tampered with your will receive an email and any other notifications or alarms . You can select the title of the email to reflect something like ” Recorder Tampered With!”

welcome

 

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