Posts Tagged ‘ analog cameras ’



Taking the Confusion out of a Security Camera System

Written By:
Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

complete-8-channel-1080p-hd-cvi-surveillance-system

So, you want a new Security Camera System for your home or business. Or, you just need to update an existing one but you don’t know exactly where to start. Here is a simple and useful checklist/flowchart that will take you step by step to help you determine the best plan of attack to tackle your Security Camera System needs.

Maybe you have an existing analog CCTV system using D1 or 960H cameras with standard coaxial cable.

Do you have an existing security system?

YESNO

For years, the standard has been RG59 coaxial cable with BNC connectors to hook up your CCTV system. Today, many newer homes and businesses have been or are being wired with CAT5, CAT5E or even CAT6.

Do you have any existing usable cable?

YYN2

You have options! The next step depends on your budget and what your ultimate goal is. The best case scenario is that you have an existing CAT5/5E/6 infrastructure since that will allow you to use the latest technology and continue to grow. If you’re not pre-wired with network cable and don’t want to break the bank running new CAT5/5E/6 cable all over your property, then hopefully you have RG59/RG6 coaxial cable. If you have no cable and need to start from scratch, I’m going to suggest that you do it right the first time and have CAT6 cable installed since applications running at 1GB/s are already putting strains on the bandwidth capabilities of CAT5E.

With existing or new CAT5/5E/6, your best choice for a recording device will be an NVR (aka Network Video Recorder). You would use an NVR along with IP network cameras. The NVR uses your local network to send and receive data and is ideal for remotely monitoring your surveillance system from your computer, tablet, or smart phone all while recording to a hard drive. Because IP cameras are on the cutting edge of surveillance technology, your security system, anchored by a quality NVR allows you to include new cameras with more advanced features. While most IP cameras and NVRs are compatible, you should always check with your surveillance system supplier to ensure all of your products will work together properly. In case you didn’t already know, when using an NVR and IP cameras, you have the ability to power your cameras through the network cable! This is an excellent benefit that eliminates the need to run an additional 18/2 power cable. We have packages like this 8 channel NVR with built in POE that are ready to plug in and go!

IPNET

Do you have coaxial cable? Ideally you would have RG6 coax cable since the larger conductor, thicker dielectric insulation and aluminum braid shielding help to more effectively handle Ghz level signals. If you don’t and have an older CCTV system and you have been using RG59 coaxial, you have a couple of options. First, confirm that you have continuity in your coaxial cable runs. Once you’ve done this, you can choose between a few options for DVR’s.

YESCOAX

The first option is a standard analog DVR or Digital Video Recorder that records at a 960H resolution (960×480). These are still widely used and are considered a reliable option due in part to the stability of the software (usually Linux) that is embedded in the chip. Capable of achieving resolutions up to 960H, this is an inexpensive upgrade from traditional D1 systems. The images are saved directly to a hard drive that we install before shipping when you purchase a hard drive along with your DVR. We’ll help you choose the number of channels (4-32) of the DVR that you need depending on the size of your property, what kind of coverage you want/need and any future expansion plans! A great place to start is with this complete 8 channel 960H DVR System!

DVRANA

Option number two is one of the newest and most interesting technologies called High Definition Composite Video Interface or HDCVI for short! The HD-CVI DVRs are capable of achieving resolutions up to 1080p and frame rates up to 30fps. This is the best choice if you want higher resolution images without having the expense of running CAT5/5E/6 cable. HDCVI technology helps you to realize multiple signal technology over one cable with video, audio and control signals all through the same coax cable! On top of that, HDCVI allows for longer distance cable runs (1600 feet or more) with no need for repeaters! HDCVI DVR’s MUSTuse HDCVI technology cameras made specifically to be used with them. Take a look at this complete 8 channel 1080p HDCVI package.

CVIANA

Last in your choice for DVRs are the MOTHER OF ALL DVRs…the Hybrid or the Tribrid! The Hybrid gives you the best of both worlds. You can combine 960H analog AND IP Network technologies for the most flexible system available. Along with all of the best features of both technologies, the coolest feature by far is the ability to DOUBLE the amount of cameras you can record (not available on all DVR’s/NVRs). That’s right! With the 16 channel HYBDVR-FE016-DH-160 you can record 16 analog cameras AND 16 IP cameras simultaneously if you choose! While the Tribrid doesn’t give you the ability to double the channels, it steps it up another notch and gives you the option of HDCVI in addition to Analog and IP Network.

HYBTRI

You know what type of cable you have and what your choices are for a recording device. Now you need to figure out how many cameras you are going to need. With Google Maps we can see an aerial view of your property and we can help you decide the best placement of cameras to give you the maximum coverage! As far as choosing the type…THAT can be overwhelming! But, when you choose our products, we will help you every step of the way and that includes deciding on camera types and options like bullets, domes, indoor, outdoor, PTZ, auto-tracking, night vision (IR), WDR, varifocal zoom, etc. etc.

Let’s pick some cameras!

You’ll be utilizing CAT5/5E/6 cable so you’ll be using an NVR and you will need to purchase IP Network Cameras. As I said before, the choices can be overwhelming but unlike the soda aisle with ten different types of the same brand, you don’t have to make uninformed choices! Let’s see what type of options you have.

IP Bullet Cameras

BULLETCAM

  1. With Bullet Cameras you have to choose whether these will be indoor or outdoor. The most important thing to look for is an IP66 rating. A camera that has that rating can be used indoor and outdoor and will be protected against the elements. The price difference is almost negligible so I would recommend getting cameras that can be used indoor or outdoor like our very reasonably priced 1.3MP IPOB-EL1MPIR50.
  2. You should choose whether you want to be able to see at night and at what distance. We have bullet cameras that have IR (Infrared) night vision capabilities so you can better identify intruders at night or in poorly lit areas. We have cameras, like our IPOB-TP2MP250L660-W that can see up to 250’ in the dark!
  3.   Your lens is also another aspect to consider. Do you want a fixed lens or do you want the ability to zoom in on objects? We offer varifocal bullet cameras that can be adjusted directly at the camera and we also offer motorized bullets like our IPOB-EL3IR100ML-D2 that is controlled right through your browser.
  4. There are other considerations like ONVIF compatibility, color, etc. but the above three are the most important.

IP Dome Cameras

IPDOME

  1. Dome Cameras give you options as well but there are a few different things to consider when using Domes. Again, look for that IP66 rating and that will ensure that you can use that camera inside or out! Consider our top-quality but inexpensive IPOD-EL1MPIR50-E as a great starting point.
  2. Do you want to be able to view people more clearly at night? You’ll want a Dome with IR (Infrared) night vision capabilities and the bad guys won’t be able to hide. See what 100’ of IR and 3MP looks like with our IPVD-EL3MPIR100!
  3. You can get fixed or varifocal lenses that will let you adjust the zoom from the camera. If you hate getting up on a ladder you might want to consider a camera like our IPVD-EL3MP100ML2812 that allows you to adjust the zoom from your browser.
  4. All of the things discussed previously like ONVIF compatibility, color, etc. are all still options but with domes you should also consider whether you want a standard turret style that has glass over the lens or a vandal proof Dome rated at IK10 which protects against a 22 pound object dropped from 15¾” in height.

IP PTZ Cameras

IPPTZ

  1. With IP PTZ Cameras, you have control! You have control of what you see because this camera has the ability to PAN, TILT and ZOOM in on a subject! Yes, they can be more expensive, but if security is your main concern then you should consider a PTZ and we have them starting at $529 for the IPPTZ-EL2L12X-Mini-i
  2. Just like the Bullet and Dome cameras, you will have the option of IR so you can see images in total darkness!
  3. The zoom function on the PTZ camera allows you to zoom into objects AND move from side to side and up and down! The full feature IPPTZ-EL1MPIR250L20X is a 1.3MP PTZ with 250’ of IR and 20X zoom that won’t break the bank.
  4. You still have options including the option of Auto Tracking that tracks a moving object upon entering the frame. Check this beauty out IPPTZ-EL2IR2L30X-AT!

You have RG59 or RG6 coaxial cable and you have a choice between Analog and CVI. Either way, we have pre-designed systems ready to ship or a helpful staff that will guide you through everything you need to know to help you make an informed decision based on your needs!

Analog Bullet Cameras

COAXBULLET

  1. The Analog Bullet Cameras are similar in design and construction methods so continue to make sure that they have that IP66 rating. We have bullets ranging in price from $19.34 for a special purchase that we made so stock up on the ELI-AN3-EB54-49R .
  2. The picture quality of these bullets measures in terms of TVL (TV Lines) which is the line density where the camera is no longer able to reproduce individual lines. The higher the number…the better the picture! The highest we currently have available is the OB-CM800IR50-W.
  3. Keep in mind that you will need to have existing power cable running with the coaxial cable or you will need to run an additional 18/2 power cable!

Analog Dome Cameras

COAXdome

  1. Our Analog Dome Cameras have you covered from 600TVL – 1200TVL. Take a look at our 1200TVL Vandal Resistant Dome that is only $44.95!
  2. You can get Domes with up to 100’ of IR and a top quality 1/3” SONY Image Sensor for under $100 with a varifocal zoom lens when you purchase our OD-LX700IR100L2812-W!
  3. Remember everything we’ve previously discussed and if you’re ever been baffled by all of the lingo, check out our online CCTV FORUM for answers 24/7.

Analog PTZ Cameras

COAXPTZ

  1. If you need to monitor your security system and want some of the most amazing detail that you can get, the PTZ with up to 36x zoom is for you!
  2. We have PTZ Cameras with no IR that you can use for the hard to see areas of your retail store starting at only $499.00!
  3. You will be amazed at the detail and quality of these images like the 23x PTZ-EL700IRL23X-D2. Imagine how helpful crisp, clear images will be if you ever need to turn them over to the police!

That covers standard analog cameras over coaxial cable! Now let’s check out some HDCVI cameras and remember, these MUST be used with HDCVI DVR’s!

CVIBULLET

  1. The HDCVI Bullet Cameras utilize the HDCVI technology that allows you to get HD quality over coaxial cable. Check out these tiny bullets that have a 720p resolution for only $59.95 CVIOB-EL1MPIR50-E
  2. HDCVI is a specially developed technology that only works with HDCVI compatible DVRs. MAKE SURE you are using HDCVI Cameras with HDCVI DVRs only!  We have a great assortment of bullets going up to 2MP!
  3. Keep in mind that you will need to have existing power cable running with the coaxial cable or you will need to run an additional 18/2 power cable!

CVI Dome Cameras

CVIDOME

  1. Imagine 1080p quality images for under $100! That’s what you get with the CVIOD-ELV22MPIR50! You couldn’t have even come close just a couple years ago.
  2. Not only do you have options in terms of image quality, IR distance, etc. but you can get domes in black like the CVIOD-TP2IR100L2812B!
  3. Don’t allow yourself to be confused. Check out our website at Security Camera King and take a look around. It’s easy to navigate, informative and we includes tons of videos! Everybody likes videos!

CVI PTZ Cameras

CVIPTZ

  1. From 12x to a screaming 20x zoom, we have a PTZ that will do and see what you need! If you think you can’t afford one . . . check again because our CVI PTZs start at just $449 and that’s a bargain for your security!
  2. Imagine a 20x PTZ with 250’ of nighttime IR for under $600 – we’ve got it CVIPTZ-EL1IR250L20X!
  3. Monitor employees, customers and areas of your business where you have limited visibility!

Don’t forget about the incidentals like cables, connectors and power supplies! That’s the easy part! Hopefully you have a better idea of what you need to put together a Home or Business Security System but if you still need help . . . we’re here! Just give us a call at 866-573-8878!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Written By:
Thursday, July 24th, 2014

CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Today there are a lot of options when it comes to choosing a quality CCTV security system. You may decide to go with a traditional analog system, HD-SDI, HD-CVI or even an IP network based security products.

One thing all of these options have in common is you will probably have to run some sort wire to the cameras. Yes, there are some “Wireless Security Camera” solutions available on the market today, but if you do some research you will find that there are a lot of limitations to wireless security cameras. Most CCTV professionals would probably not recommend a wireless system in an environment where up-time and security are critical.

install

I do want to mention that it is possible to reliably transmit video wirelessly using a device such as the TP-LocoM5 – Wireless Access Point/Bridge as seen here at www.securitycameraking.com.

But even then you would still need to have a power wire run to the camera or a local power source near the camera and it only works with IP Cameras.

That being said, we will be talking about a fully-wired system in conjunction with a storage device such as a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) or NVR (Network Video Recorder).

NEW INSTALLATION
When installing a completely new security system you may want to have the video and power wires come from a single location located near the storage device (DVR or NVR) as shown below.

ANALOG SYSTEMS
Analog, HD-SDI and HD-CVI cameras will need two wires run to them. One for video transmission and a set of power wires in order to power the camera. You could run a coax wire and separate power wires but most CCTV professionals choose to use “Siamese Cable”. Siamese Cable is a manufactured coax cable with a set of power wires attached to it. The power wires can be split off from the coax in cases where your power source may not be in a close proximity to your recording device.

Siamese-Cable

NETWORK IP SYSTEMS
IP cameras use digital video transmission over CAT5 or CAT6 cable. In most cases you run your video and power to and from the camera on the same CAT5 or CAT6 wire, assuming you are using a POE (Power Over Ethernet) power source such as a POE injector or POE Switch.

Some NVRs come with built in POE,  but in most cases it is recommended to use an external POE switch like the POE-8MB1G from SecurityCameraKing.com. When using an external POE switch all of your CAT5 or CAT6 will run directly from each camera to a POE switch that is connected to your local network. Then you simply connect your NVR to the network and you are all set.

POE-Setup

Most IP cameras also come with an additional power wire if you choose not to use POE and power them with 12v or 24v power as shown below.

IP-Cable

If you are going to power your IP camera with 12v /24v power  you will still run all of your CAT5 or CAT6 from the camera to a Non-POE switch (usually significantly less expensive than a POE switch) but you will run an extra set of power wires from a power source to each camera.

NO-POE-Setup

RUNNING YOUR CABLES

Now it’s time to run your cable. The following will cover 2 popular scenarios.

Scenario 1: Running your cable through your attic and mounting your cameras to the soffit. This is a common installation option, provided you have access to your attic and your soffits are also accessible.

First you have to choose the placement of you recorder and power supply. Some people simply have them located in an office or a room within their home.  Others prefer having them in a more secure location such as in a lockbox, hidden in a closet, or even in the attic itself.

The image below shows the recorder and power supply inside a room of the home. Power and video wires run up the wall into the attic to the location where the camera will be located and out a small hole in the soffit were the camera will be mounted.

sOFFIT

Scenario 2: Another option is to run your cable through an exterior wall and then use conduit on the exterior of your structure to run your cables from one camera to another. This is a great option for those who do not have an attic or limited access to one.

Junction

Mounting Your Cameras

Once you have run your wires to the desired location you can connect your camera. In some cases where the cables are coming out of the soffit it is possible to connect your wires together and tuck the connections up into the hollow area of the soffit, then mount the camera directly to the soffit.

Direct-soffit-mount

In situations where you’re running your wires through a solid concrete or brick wall that the connections cannot be tucked into, it is common to mount a junction box.

Junction

Junction Boxes and Conduit
Junction boxes are particularly useful when running your cable through conduit on the exterior of your structure as they serve as a weather proof container protect your power and video connections from the elements and also provide you with a flat surface to mount your cameras to.

Box1

First you will pull your wires through the access hole on the back of the junction box. Then mount the junction box to the wall. You may have to drill a hole in the junction box cover big enough to feed your camera connections through. Next, connect the camera to the power and video connection(s). Then screw the cover on to the junction box. Now you can mount you camera to the junction box. See the diagram below.

JB

When used on a soffit, a junction box will sometimes be helpful in order to lower and drop your cameras below obstructions such as deep fascia boards as shown below.

obstruction

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

How to Troubleshoot Analog Security Cameras

Written By:
Friday, December 6th, 2013

Frustrated Man

Help my camera is dead and I don’t know what to do!!!! Relax the Camera is not going to cause a cascading failure and blow up the whole system or burn the house down. You will need a multi meter to verify voltages and amps.  Depending on where your cameras are located is how you may want to proceed. If the cameras are easy to get to the first thing I would do is break out a ladder if needed and get up to the camera.

If your camera has IR or infrared cup your hand around the camera to trick the sensor so it thinks it is night then see if the IRs do come on.  If they do good, I know the camera is getting power. I would still test power output regardless if IRs comes on.  The infrared does not need much to power up so there could still be an issue.  If this camera is a DC then you should get at or above 12 volts DC. Should the camera be AC the reading should be at or above 24 volts AC.  11.7 volts is close but not enough 23.9 volts is close but not enough. The voltage must be at or above the required amount. It has been my experience that “almost” in voltage needed is not enough. Almost only counts in horse shoes and hand grenades.  The camera may give you a video feed during day but as soon as the Infra-Red led come on the camera will act very strange, or the camera will act strange to begin with.

Now at this point let us say you have less than required or no power at the camera.  You now need to go to your power supply to test it also taking the camera down at this point is advisable. Check the connections on the coax cable. Twist on BNC connectors is convenient but they do get loose if they move or shake for whatever reason they will make the camera have grainy or lines or a waviness to the image produced. BNC Twists are an unreliable connection. I like them for bench testing since they are so convenient. For installation I avoid them if I can. In the early days of computing there was a phenomena called chip creep. Ram chips would get hot and cold and slowly work themselves out of the slot on mother board. It is logical that the same would happen with the twists over time.

Crimp on BNC connectors and compression fittings are the best. Some people will swear by crimp on BNC other people will swear by compression BNC. In either case they typically do not become loose preventing video loss or poor images. For both types of connectors you need the specified tool to install the ends. Pliers will not get the job done they will only create a problem.

Now that we have the camera in question down it is time to go back to the power supply and do some testing. Check output on the channel of the power supply is do you get 12vdc or 24vac. If we get the full output needed at power supply connect camera directly to power supply and DVR. Does the issue go away in day and night mode? If it does then you now know something is going on the cable.  If not we know for sure the camera is not operating correctly. This could be from any number of reasons. To prevent the cameras from going bad a surge protector is always recommended. If you can get a battery backup and conditioner, the conditioner cleans up feedback or interference on the power side that can cause cameras to act very strange.

For cable issues there several ways to go about determining what to do next. First is how long of a cable run do you have? Coax cables have limitations on distance. The common cable RG59 which most people use for CCTV has the highest attenuation or signal loss. It is never recommended to use RG59 above a distance of 1000 feet. Some people do not recommend to use RG59 over 750 feet. Having a cable that has an impedance of 75 ohms is crucial. If the impedance is outside of that you will get more signal loss.  If you are using RG6 this coax cable has lower attenuation so you can get more distance before running into problems. Normally you can get up to 1500 feet. RG6 is recommended for use between 1000 – 1500 feet. As there is a price difference I would not use RG6 unless distance required it. RG11 is the thickest of the cables used. It does have the lowest attenuation of all coax cable. You can get up to 2000 feet on a home run.  With all cable bending and pulling cable can and will damage the cable. Using a lubricant helps in preventing damage from pulling. When it comes to bending any cable you cannot bend, twist, or roll up cable tighter that the radius of the cable itself. If you do, get a new piece of cable because you just damaged that cable. The cable may work but the longer the run the more likely you will have a bad video feed. Once you bend the cable that far you put a kink in the wire and add to the resistance. Another issue I have seen is failure to ensure there are no jagged edges for the cable to get caught on or sliced into. For example running cable in an attic there are old rusty nails and screws everywhere. If a screw gets in contact with cable you can inadvertently add an extra ground the “POOF” no more video or you get static if you’re lucky. Sometimes it just is not possible to measure resistance on a cable run end to end that is why I say take the camera down so we can isolate the issue.

With the steps I have outlined you should be able to troubleshoot your system when issues arise. I can tell you that most issues in CCTV arise from to long of cable runs with the wrong cable type. Power is especially problematic as the thinner the wire the higher the voltage drop at distance.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail