Posts Tagged ‘ COmpression’



DVR Security System Cameras

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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DVR Security Camera systems

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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DVR and Security Camera Systems

Written By:
Monday, September 27th, 2010

What is the relationship between a DVR and security camera systems? Is DVR necessary in a security camera system? What kinds of DVRs are there? Are there substitutes for DVRs? What is a DVR anyway?
Let’s examine a basic digital video security camera system and how it operates. Afterwards, we’ll be able to answer some of the specific questions related to the DVR and security camera systems.

A basic digital video security camera system is a component system that consists of three major components:
1) One to many cameras;
2) A DVR or Digital Video Recorder; and,
3) A monitor or monitors

The system operates in the following manner. The digital video camera converts light energy into electrical energy which can be measured and is used to create digital video data. This data is sent to the DVR. As previously mentioned, the DVR is a digital video recorder, just like the hard disk drive or HDD of a personal computer. However, in security camera systems, the DVR normally contains a processor, just like the processor in a Personal Computer or PC.

However, the processor in a DVR is a highly specialized piece of electronic circuitry. Unlike the PC processor, the security camera DVR processor is manufactured to handle specific functions of security camera systems such as digital video file production, camera control, and recording of digital video files. It uses a specific utility called a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC program to process the digital video file from the digital video data sent to it by the video camera.

Digital video is basically nothing more than a series of rapid digital photographs taken in rapid succession. Typically, high quality digital video is about 30 digital photographs taken within on second, also referred to as 30 frames per second or 30 fps. When you think of the file size from just one high quality digital photograph, you can imagine how enormous a digital video file that takes 30 fps for 24 hours could be.

That’s why the DVR’s processor uses a CODEC to create the digital video file. It uses special programming that shrinks the size of the file without sacrificing the high quality of the image. CODECS change from time to time as different approaches and technologies make each CODEC better and more efficient. One of the most popular and recent CODECs is called the H.264 CODEC.

The DVR and security camera system create, process, and store digital video files that can be viewed instantly (live) on monitors or stored for later viewing on monitors or for archiving. Many DVRs also have additional storage options such as CD/DVD writers or USB Flash drive connectivity to copy portions of video to portable media. This may be necessary to give insurance companies, police departments, as evidence, etc.

The DVR may also contain other specialized features. One common feature of many modern DVRs is internet connectivity. The DVR may contain its own web server technology and programming so that it may be connected to any broadband internet service and instantly become accessible anywhere in the world there is broadband internet accessibility.

Most DVR and security camera systems come in 4, 8, or 16 channels. This means that the DVR can handle 4, 8, or 16 separate camera inputs at one time. Security systems requiring more than 16 cameras simply use additional DVRs to expand the number of cameras needed.

Highly specialized security cameras may have highly specialized DVRs. Portable systems, systems that are used for a small amount of time, systems that have self contained cameras and DVRs all in one unit may utilize different digital storage methods for the DVR. For example school bus DVR and security camera systems often use a Compact Flash Card or similar portable storage medium instead of a full sized hard disk drive as the DVR.

Is a DVR necessary in a security camera system? No, not necessarily, but a system with just a monitor and no DVR will not be able to record the video so that it may be reproduced for later use. A baby monitor is usually a good example of this. On the other hand, a retail store facility would not realize the full potential of protection without a DVR and security camera system.

Other DVR and security camera systems functions pertaining to the DVR may include audio recording, various output display resolutions as well as connectors, remote control, e-mail and smartphone notification, and mouse and/or keyboard control.

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