Posts Tagged ‘ Digital Signal Processor’



IP Cameras Security Surveillance

Written By:
Friday, January 7th, 2011

One of the ever increasing most popular digital video camera security systems is the IP cameras security surveillance. This camera system is unique in that it utilizes the internet as a medium for sending video images and remotely controlling the camera making accessibility nearly ubiquitous throughout the world.

There are a few variations on the theme on how these cameras and/or camera security systems operate, but the end product is the same. A digital video file that can be viewed virtually anywhere there is broadband internet access and stored on a personal computer’s hard drive for later use or archiving.

Let’s take a quick look at an average standalone digital video security camera system and how it works so we can better understand how IP cameras security surveillance systems work. A standalone system is so named because it can be used by itself without any additional outside equipment (i.e. other than the standard system equipment, no additional PC or other device for example is required).

A typical standalone digital video security system contains one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR with a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, and a monitor. The digital video cameras in these systems capture light images and transform them into electronic video images. The camera normally contains an analog-to-digital processor chip that sends the video image data in binary or digital form to the DVR unit.

The DVR unit consists of three primary types of devices; the Hard Disk Drive (HDD), the DSP previously mentioned, and any additional peripheral type devices such as CD or DVD recorders to make portable copies of video files. The digital signal comes from the camera via an RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable to the DVR unit. Each individual camera must have its own cable run from the camera to the DVR unit.

When the data reached the DVR unit the DSP processes the data, applies a COmpression/DECompression utility (or CODEC) that greatly compacts the information and reduces the final size of the digital video file. The digital video files is then viewed on a monitor (live) and/or saved to the HDD for later use.

IP cameras security surveillance systems differ in that they normally connect to the Internet instead of using a video transmission cable to relay the camera data to the DVR unit. Furthermore, IP (which stands for Internet Protocol ready) cameras do this normally by one of two methods; either the data is sent via a Cat 5 Ethernet cable to a router or modem or wirelessly to a wireless router or wireless modem.

Using the internet, especially the wireless technology, creates a great advantage for this system. Once the signal make it to an Internet connection the cameras can be viewed and/or controlled from anywhere in the world that broadband internet is accessible. This includes working in tandem with devices such as a Personal Computer or Mac Computer, iPhones, iPads and the like, and many 3G and 4G smartphones. Literally, you can see what is going on at home in Miami when you are on business travel in Paris.

Another advantage of the IP cameras security surveillance system is the ability to use wireless internet technology. This eliminates the need to run the RG-59 coaxial cable from each camera to the DVR unit, greatly reducing installation time and making the process a do-it-yourself project that is a snap.

IP cameras used for security surveillance are able to work by processing the video signal on board and sending it via the camera’s on board web server technology. A variation on this theme is the IP DVR. In this instance the standard cameras are used in conjunction with the DVR but the DVR has the IP capability and is connected to a router or modem. The files are stored on the DVR units HDD but are accessible via the internet to the user.

On the receiving end of an IP camera security surveillance system that uses a personal computer the digital video files are stored on the computer’s HDD and viewed on the computer’s monitor. Normally this systems work in tandem with common internet browsers such as Internet Explorer, Safari, etc. Installation setup normally consists of a self installing software CD so for many systems no prior computer networking knowledge is needed.

Security Camera King has a full line of digital video security systems. Contact one of our experts today if you are interested in purchasing an IP cameras security surveillance system.

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Wireless PC Compatible Security Camera

Written By:
Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Nothing can offer you the peace of mind in security and the power and flexibility of application and use like a wireless PC compatible security camera. Thanks to modern electronic technology advancements and the growth of internet applications, a wireless PC compatible security camera is also reasonably priced to be affordable for just about any budget.

What exactly is a wireless PC compatible security camera and how does it work? We’ll attempt to answer these questions in the following article in order to give you a better understanding of the device and help you to decide if it is right for your security and monitoring application.

Before we talk about a wireless PC compatible security camera, let’s describe a basic standalone system first. A standard digital video security camera system usually consists of one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor. The digital video cameras are connected to the DVR by a video transmission cable, usually RG-59 coaxial cable. A cable must be run from each camera to the DVR unit.

The camera(s) captures light images and converts them into electronic video images. It also converts the data created for this into digital or binary form using an on-board analog-to-digital processing chip. The digital data is sent to the DVR where a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, a highly specialized computer processor dedicated to making videos, uses the data to create a digital video file. The digital video file can be viewed in real-time (live) and/or saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive for later viewing, copying, etc.

A wireless PC compatible security camera captures the image and creates the digital video image in the same manner. However, it differs by transmitting the initial digital data from the camera wirelessly and by storing the data on a PC’s hard disk drive. Basically it eliminates the use of a standalone DVR and processor unit as well as a separate monitor. This has advantages and disadvantages that we will discuss later.

Most wireless PC compatible security cameras are their own little system. The camera captures the image, transfers it into digital form, creates a type of digital video file and then sends it via an on-board transmitter to a corresponding wireless internet connection such as a wireless router or wireless modem. The camera unit usually has its own IP address that identifies it on the Internet.

Using a common Internet browser, the user can access the secure camera with a username and password, and monitor as well as control some functions remotely from any personal computer, Mac computer, Apple iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and even 3G and 4G smartphones. Some cameras have the ability to move horizontally and/or vertically to increase the range of the camera’s field of vision and may be able to enlarge objects in the field of vision. These cameras called Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ cameras can be controlled remotely from a computer Internet browser as well.

These cameras normally use MPEG4 or MJPEG video compression to reduce the size of the digital video file to make it easier to send via the internet. Generally, you need not be an IT professional to install and operate these cameras. All you need to do for most wireless PC compatible security cameras is mount the camera and install some software from a CD onto your computer or download an application (app) to your smart phone and your ready to go.

These systems use the PC to replace the standalone DVR unit and monitor. If the user wants to record the video files for archiving or later viewing they can normally save them on their computer’s hard drive. If they choose to view them live, they can watch them on the computer’s monitor using most common internet browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, etc.

As mentioned earlier, there are advantages and disadvantages to using wireless PC compatible security camera systems instead of standalone systems. Probably the greatest single advantage is lower cost due to the fact that a standalone DVR or monitor is not required as an existing personal computer can be used instead. Also, since the Internet is the medium for distributing the final video file, the cameras can be remotely accessed from anywhere in the world there is broadband internet access.

There are disadvantages. The system could be prone to computer viruses, Internet bog downs, and using so much of your personal computer’s resources that it effects the computer’s performance for doing other tasks.

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Wireless Security Solutions

Written By:
Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Wireless Security SolutionsTwenty first century electronic technical advances have created more reliable yet cost effective wireless security solutions than ever before. Most wireless security solutions are generally easy to install and simple to operate. In fact, they are often considered as do-it-yourself type projects and are specifically designed with that intention in mind.

There are basically two types of wireless security solutions, wireless security alarm systems and wireless digital video security camera systems. Each takes advantage of up-to-date wireless technology to enhance the features of their systems. Let’s take a look at each and see what is currently available.

As previously mentioned, one type of wireless security solution is the wireless security alarm system. There are two big advantages to using a wireless alarm system. First, the system itself is easy to install and operate. Second, aesthetically speaking, a wireless alarm is much more pleasing to the eye because it doesn’t require that a wire be run from each and every sensor to the master control panel.

Wireless alarm systems can be used for just about any application anywhere. A basic residential alarm system typically has door and window sensors on any readily accessible door or window (usually those above the second floor are not armed with sensors due to their inaccessibility). In addition, the system may utilize one or more motion detectors as well.

Each of these devices must communicate with the master control panel. They use this line of communication to tell the control panel that something has occurred (an event) and that their internal mechanism (usually some sort of switch) has been activated (triggered). Each sensor in an alarm system must have a separate transmitting wire that is run to the master control panel.

Wireless security solutions for alarm systems eliminate the need for this wire. Instead, each sensor usually has its own on-board power (a battery) and transmitter in addition to the switching device that is used to detect an event. When a trigger activates the sensors switch, the transmitter is turned on and sends a signal to the master control panel to initiate the alarm.

These sensors, including their batteries and transmitters can be quite small. The manufacturers take advantage of the latest electronic technology so the entire circuit to run the switching mechanism and transmit the signal can be created on an Integrated Circuit (IC) chip less than an inch in size.

The other major type of wireless security solution is a wireless digital video security system. Technological advances in these systems has taken leaps and bounds, compared to the original, bulky, analog parent cameras. In addition, the with the advent of digital video, the digital video security camera industry has been able to reap the constantly improving benefits produced by the computer and cell phone industries as well.

A typical digital video security camera system has three components. The camera or cameras capture video light images and transform them into electrical images. These images are part of a digital video file that is created by a Digital Signal Processor or DSP that accompanies the Digital Video Recorder unit or DVR. The digital file can be viewed live or at some later time on the monitor.

There are basically two different types of wireless digital video security systems. Both systems involve using radio waves to send their signals wirelessly but each type uses a different technology.

The first digital wireless security solution is the use of wireless digital video cameras. These cameras are no different than their “wired” counterparts accept they do not require a video transmission cable (usually RG-59 coaxial cable) to be run from each camera to the DVR unit. Instead, they send their data which is digital, in radio wave form either to a receiver that is connected to a DVR or to a wireless DVR that has a receiver built in.

The second digital wireless security solution is the use of wireless digital video cameras call Internet Protocol or IP ready cameras. These cameras contain on-board circuitry to not only capture and create digital data, but to transmit it in the form of a file that can be sent long distances using the Internet as the vehicle for networking. These cameras usually contain their own web server technology and transmit using WiFi technology.

So, as you can see there is a lot to talk about concerning wireless security solutions. If you are interested in a specific technology, check Security Camera King’s CCTV Learning Center for more information.

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Security System Devices

Written By:
Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

There are many security system devices. For the sake of this discussion, we’ll categorize security system devices into two separate groups, digital video security camera systems and non-video security camera systems. In the following article we’ll discuss what some of these devices are for both categories.

Our two arbitrary security system devices categories have both benefited by advanced electronic circuit and computer technologies. Improvements in these technologies have directly or indirectly influenced security system devices such that these devices more efficient and cheaper, and in some cases, has made owning a device possible when it wasn’t possible to do so in the past.

Digital Video Security System Devices

Digital video security systems generally consist of three basic components. While it’s true that there may be additional devices based on the user’s choice, nearly every system will contain or use each of these three components: They are 1) digital video cameras; 2) Digital Video Recorders or DVRs; and, 3) Monitors.

Digital video cameras can be further categorized into two types themselves, based on where they are used. Indoor cameras are used in situations where they are not exposed to weather and other outside elements. Outdoor cameras are enclosed in a protective case so they can withstand exposure to weather and the elements.

Both indoor and outdoor cameras have many features that allow them to be used as highly specialized security system devices. How they do this is outside the scope of this article, however we will list some of these devices according to the features that seem to qualify them as different types of security system devices:
• Wireless Cameras;
• Very light sensitive low-Lux day/night vision cameras;
• Night vision infrared cameras;
• Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ cameras;
• Camera that record video and audio;
• Internet Protocol or IP ready cameras that can use the internet as a vehicle for networking; and
• Cameras with motion detector switching.

DVRs contain a Digital Signal Processor or DSP that reads the camera data and uses it to create a digital video file. This file is viewed on the monitor and or stored for later used on the DVR. Typically, the number of video inputs the DVR can handle at one time (also called “channels”) dictates the number of cameras in a one DVR unit system. If we consider different types of DVRs as security system devices, here is a list of some of the more common:
• Four, eight, and sixteen channel DVRs;
• DVR cards that use a personal computer as a DVR unit;
• Wireless DVRs;
• Internet Protocol (IP) ready DVRs; and,
• Miniature DVRs that use miniature storage media such as SD cards or thumb drives.

Monitors are used to view live video or recorded video. Most monitors today are color LCD monitors, just like the ones used for personal computing. Security system monitors may differ from typical computer monitors in the way they connect to the DVR or security camera. These DVRs may have additional connection types that may not be typical of computer monitors (such as BNC connectors).

Non-digital Video Security System Devices

The other category of security system devices is the non-digital video security system devices. For our discussion, this generally means security alarms. Most security alarm systems contain two major components, the sensors and the master control center/dialer.

The sensors are used as type of switch to monitor a particular state of an object such as being open, closed, or in motion. When the sensor has detected the desired trigger, it either closes a circuit with the master control panel or sends a wireless signal to the master control panel to notify it of the change. If we consider different alarm sensors as different security system devices then we can provide the following partial list:
• Door and window sensors;
• Temperature sensors;
• Humidity sensors;
• Poll sensors (detect the presence of someone or something);
• Motion detectors;
• Smoke and fire detectors;
• CO (carbon monoxide) and other chemical sensors;
• Light sensors; and,
• Sound sensors.

Master control panels coordinate the sensors and the alarms, including autodialing telephone numbers and playing a message to the receiving party, if equipped.

This is just a small example of the many security system devices that are available at Security Camera King. Check out our on-line catalogue of items if you are interested in purchasing any security system devices.

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Surveillance Spy Cameras

Written By:
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

If you need to keep an eye on someone without them getting an eye on you try using surveillance spy cameras. Actually, these cameras not only allow you to keep an eye on someone but also something like a pet, a house, a boat or some other type of property.

What exactly is a surveillance spy camera? Typically, a surveillance spy camera is a special type of digital video security and surveillance camera.

A digital video security camera usually has one of three different shapes. Box cameras look like rectangular box shapes and are typically mounted on walls, posts, and other areas. Bullet cameras resemble box cameras but have rounded ends, hence the name “bullet.” Dome cameras are normally flush mounted on a ceiling or wall and have a small protective bubble or dome that covers the camera. The presence of these cameras is somewhat obvious and their usually is no attempt to hide or disguise them.

Surveillance spy cameras on the other hand are digital video cameras that are much smaller, so small in fact that they are often hidden or disguised as other objects. They may contain their own Digital Video Recorder or DVR and power supply and be an entire standalone system, or they may require an external power supply and be incorporated into an entire digital video security system that has both hidden and visible cameras, a standalone DVR with a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, and a monitor.

How can surveillance spy cameras be so small? Let’s look at how a full-size digital video security camera works then will look take a look at a surveillance spy camera. Digital video cameras have three main components within the camera; the lens, a sensor chip, and the electronic circuitry used to operate the sensor chip and convert its information into digital data (a series of 1s and 0s).

The lens is a highly machined mechanically functioning glass (or plastic) that focuses the cameras field of view onto the sensor chip. Generally, the higher quality and type of lens, the higher quality of the video produced. Lenses determine how far, how wide, and how detailed the target area will appear.

There are two types of sensor chips, a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and a Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS. These two chips work a little differently but accomplish the same objective, transferring light energy into electrical energy. These chips are usually square or at least rectangular in shape and usually range from 1/4 inch to 1 inch in size.

Electronic circuitry is used to interpret the chip, read its information, and convert it from an analog signal into digital data. The electronic circuitry may also provide other functions such as audio recording and movement of different camera parts.

Surveillance spy cameras contain the same components but the components are designed to be very, very small while still performing the needed task. For example, most of these cameras are extremely small. Their lens is not a full size variable lens but is a very small wide angle lens instead. This eliminates the need for a large lens attachment.

Secondly, surveillance spy cameras usually use one of two sizes for their CCDs or CMOSs, 1/4 inch or 1/3 inch. The incredibly small sizes of these sensor chips allows them to be used (hidden or disguised) in very small objects such as ink pens (see Security Camera King’s product # HC-PEN for example) or wristwatches (see our product # HC-Watch).

Finally, with the latest improvements in Integrated Circuit (IC) chip technology, incredibly complex circuits can be made in circuit chips that are only 1/4 inch in size also. For example, the electronic circuitry needed to activate and read the sensor, convert the information into digital data, and transmit it wirelessly to a corresponding receiver can be fit with a IC chip less than an inch in size.

In addition, surveillance spy cameras can also have their own miniature DVR in the form of a small memory chip. As computer memory technology advances, these chips become smaller yet hold more data. The data on the memory chip can be downloaded to a personal computer using a USB cord.

Security Camera King has a very wide assortment of surveillance spy cameras available for purchase. These cameras come in all sizes and types (view the products individually on-line by clicking on the left hand side of the page “Security Cameras” then “Hidden Security Cameras” or “Wireless Hidden Cameras” or “Hidden Camera Systems.”

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