Posts Tagged ‘ Dome cameras’



Evaluations Of Camera Security Systems

Written By:
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

In this article we will talk about evaluations of camera security systems and what you need to do and know to perform your own evaluations of camera security systems.

Evaluation of camera security systems can be difficult to do comparatively because of subtle differences in manufacturers’ digital video systems; so when trying to determine what system type or component to purchase, consider performing your own needs assessment first. Then search for the equipment that satisfies those requirements. Finally, you can compare different manufacturers’ or vendors’ brand offerings and prices.

Let’s cover the basics of performing a needs assessment based on the technological capabilities of digital video camera security systems. In order to make things a little easier to compare, we’ll break up the system into its three component parts and consider each component separately.

A typical digital video camera security system consists of one or more digital video cameras, the Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor. We will confine our evaluations of camera security systems here to standalone systems only.

First, determine what you need to protect or monitor. A room, a building, land, property located outside or inside, a parking lot, people, shoppers, cash register or teller areas, etc. Once you know exactly what you need to record, you can move on to deciding how you will record it. This is where the expertise of a professional installer is particularly helpful. An experienced installer can assess your situation and determine the precise placement and minimum number of cameras needed to do the job.

Once you know how many cameras are required, you can begin to narrow your evaluations of camera security systems. Generally speaking, the maximum number of cameras in a system determines the type of DVR that you will need. Customary DVR camera configurations include four, eight, and sixteen potential cameras (Note: The number of cameras is also referred to as “channels” which is not to be confused with another use of the word “channels” that describes specific radio frequencies). If a system requires more than sixteen cameras additional DVRs are used to satisfy the need.

So let’s assume our system will require seven cameras. We now know we will need an 8 channel DVR, but we aren’t ready to select the DVR just yet. Now let’s go back to the cameras. Of our seven cameras we know that four will be used outside and three will be used inside.

Now you must ask yourself what kind of digital video monitoring do you need? Do you require full time (24/7) day and night, do you track or follow objects (cars and people for example), and is audio required, and so on. Once you know the exact requirements of the camera you can determine exactly what type of camera you will need.

Let’s assume we need four outdoor, wireless, night vision infrared digital color cameras with a motion detector. These cameras will also be battery operated. In addition, we’ll need three indoor cameras without any special functions. However, we do need to determine how we will mount these cameras so we know what type of camera we will need for each of the seven cameras (dome, bullet, or box type cameras).

In performing your evaluation of camera security systems for this set-up you will also need to purchase a four channel receiver unit (a receiver unit that can accept four camera inputs and receive each on a separate frequency). This unit will be attached to the DVR. Speaking of which, we can now return to the DVR to consider what to purchase.

We know we need an 8 channel DVR. Do you want to be able to record for long periods of time without erasing over pre-recorded monitoring? If so, you should consider a DVR with a large capacity hard drive. Do you want to make copies of files on DVDs/CDs or other media? Do you need the DVR to connect to the internet? These questions will help determine the type of DVR you require.

Finally, ask yourself what type of monitor you will need. Will the monitor be used for setting up the system and occasional use or will the monitor be watched the majority of the time? (Monitors used for setup can be very small; monitors that will be used frequently should be large enough to view all seven cameras clearly).

After considering what we need, we can now perform evaluations of camera security systems to determine the best prices and products for our application.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Security Cameras Monitoring Systems

Written By:
Friday, October 22nd, 2010

Some of the most popular items used for protection and surveillance today are security cameras monitoring systems. These systems take advantage of the latest and greatest in both electronic and computer technology making them incredibly powerful and versatile to use. In addition to deterring burglary and/or vandalism, security cameras monitoring systems offer you the peace of mind of knowing that your business, residence, or loved ones are okay.

Most security cameras monitoring systems are component systems; that is, parts of the system may differ in function (i.e. one camera may have Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ and another may not) or may be made by different manufacturers (i.e. the cameras may be produced by one manufacturer while the DVR is produced by another). Regardless of the differences between components, all of the separate parts can work together to create a functional and effective security camera monitoring system.

Security cameras monitoring systems work in the following manner. The digital video camera “captures” a light image and transfers it into an electrical image. This electrical based image is sent in the form of electronic data to the DVR or Digital Video Recorder. The DVR normally contains a special type of computer processor known as a Digital Signal Processor or DSP. The DSP compiles the data from the video camera and creates a digital video file of the data which can e stored on the DVR or viewed in real time (live) on a monitor.

The DSP normally uses a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility to make the digital video file smaller without sacrificing quality. This is necessary because digital video files are comprised of thousands of digital photographs. In fact, they are digital photographs, but they are taken at a high rate of speed, usually around 30 photographs or Frames Per Second or 30 FPS.

This means that for every one second of video, the file will contain the equivalent of data for 30 individual digital photographs. As you can see, the file can get very large in a hurry so a CODEC is a vital and necessary tool.

The security cameras monitoring system may also include a CD/DVD writer, SD card writer, or accommodate a USB thumb drive for archiving files or for providing copies of files on a portable media to police, insurance agencies, etc.

There are a variety of optional features available for digital video security cameras however it may be easier to differentiate between cameras if they are categorized first, based on two of these features. The first criteria to use for categorizing the cameras can be the shape of the camera itself. There are three basic shapes or types:
• Box shaped cameras;
• Bullet shaped cameras; and,
• Dome cameras.

Box shaped cameras look just like the name implies; they are rectangular shaped to resemble a small box. These cameras may be mounted on walls, ceilings, and other structures. Bullet shaped cameras are elongated and rounded in shape on the ends to resemble a bullet-type structure. They may also be mounted on walls, ceilings and other structures. Finally, dome shaped cameras are usually flush mounted on ceilings with a rounded dome protrusion just big enough to allow for the camera lens.

The second criteria for categorizing digital video security cameras is whether they are designed for indoor use, outdoor use, or both. Indoor use only cameras cannot be used outdoors because they may be damaged by exposure to dust, water, and other debris. Outdoor security cameras monitoring systems or indoor/outdoor cameras are enclosed in a protective case that allows the camera to function properly but prevents entry (ingress) of dust, water and other matter.

Many outdoor cameras will be certified according to the protection the enclosure provides using a International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard called an Ingress Protection code or IP rating. This code consists of two digits; the first digit represents protection from dust and the second digit represents protection from liquids. The first digit of the rating ranges from 0 to 6 and the second digit ranges from 0 to 8, the higher number indicating a greater rate of protection. An IP65 rating for example, means the enclosure is dust tight and provides protection from water projected by a nozzle against the enclosure from any direction.

There are many other option features available on the components of security cameras monitoring systems. If you are interested in additional information, check our knowledge base or security articles or contact one of our security experts today.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Security Cameras for the Home

Written By:
Monday, September 27th, 2010

There are several types of security cameras for in home use. In fact, just about any security camera can be used for residential purposes although there are cameras that are more suited for in home use than others. Security camera technology has advanced so much recently that the versatility of security cameras for in home use is almost limitless.

Every home is different; the number of rooms in the home, the perimeter area that surrounds the home and the size of the home’s yard, the entrances and exits, number of windows, especially those on the ground floor – all vary from house to house. As every home’s design is different, so are the uses and needs for the security cameras for that home.

The most effective method to determine what security cameras for in home use are best for you is to evaluate your home design and your security desires and needs. After determining what you need to provide and the level of security and monitoring you desire, you can more easily begin the process of shopping for specific cameras that will satisfy those requirements.

Still, as stated earlier, there are security cameras for in home use that are more suited for this application than others. For an obvious example, an explosion proof camera or housing would be a ridiculous and unnecessary expense for in home use. However Security Camera King offers several different indoor security cameras that are perfect for in home use.

One way to narrow down your camera choice is to determine if you will be able to run the video transmission cable from each camera to the processor/DVR or Digital Video Recorder or if you would prefer a wireless camera instead. Cabling is the least expensive and the most common option for connecting the digital video camera to the DVR.

However, if installing the RG59 coaxial cable would be troubling for you, or if the cable would seem unsightly, or for any other reason the cable would not be right for you, wireless cameras would be the appropriate selection. Wireless cameras still require electrical power supply, normally in the form of a small wire run to the camera from a plug-in transformer or power distribution box. There are some wireless cameras that use rechargeable batteries as well.

Wireless cameras make use of radio technology to broadcast their video data to a corresponding receiver which then transfers the signal to the DVR. So a receiver is also needed if you choose the wireless camera option. Most receivers can handle up to four cameras at one time so if your system requires more than four cameras additional receivers (or a receiver that can handle more than four cameras) will be needed.

Regardless of whether you use cable or wireless technology, there are several different security cameras for in home use based on appearance, mounting design, and function. There are basically three types of cameras based on appearance. They are the box, bullet, and dome types, with each name representing a description of the appearance of the camera.

Each type has its own benefits and deficits. The box camera is probably the most common style of video camera but can also be somewhat obtrusive mounted on a room wall. The bullet type is also popular, but this type of camera usually lends itself to weatherproofing and infrared technology geared toward the outdoors. So if the box and bullet types are not appropriate for your application, then the dome type camera would probably be the best choice.

Dome cameras are fairly low-profile cameras with many available as a flush mount. Flush mounted dome cameras are installed in the wall or ceiling with only the “bubble” cover extending away from the surface. Security Camera King offers several different types of indoor dome cameras based on use and resolution display. That includes total darkness capable night vision infrared dome cameras as well.

Another category of security cameras for in home use include the hidden or disguised camera types. The cameras are embedded inside clocks, thermostats, and other everyday items to disguise their appearance.

To determine what camera is best for you, talk to one of our security experts today.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail