Posts Tagged ‘ HD-CVI’



How to configure an HDCVI Camera and HDCVI DVR

Written By:
Monday, May 5th, 2014

Technology is one of my favorite topics and when it comes to security equipment I chose to write about how it works and explain how easy is to work with one of our products we offer.

Today I will be introducing a new technology called HDCVI (High Definition Composite Video interface) and I will be demonstrating how this HDCVI DVR will change the way analog systems will slowly fall and the HD world will dominate the security system market.

What is HDCVI?

HDCVI (High Definition Composite Video interface) is an independent and proprietary technology where it is capable of transmitting High Definition Video over standard coaxial cable. Also, HD-CVI is capable of transmitting up to 2 Megapixel video over existing coax cable infrastructures up to 1600 feet without any third party repeaters Hardware; this provides a much better solution than HD-SDI which is limited to 300 feet transmission.

The following pictures will show you front and back panels of an HDCVI DVR 4CH and 8CH:

HDCVI DVR 4 Channel Back

4 Channel Back Panel

HDCVI DVR 8 Channel Back

8 Channel Back Panel

HDCVI DVR Front

Front Panel 4 & 8 Channel

What type of cable I can use?

HDCVI Cable_Connectors

HDCVI can be used with regular RG59 (Siamese Cable). This type of cable is found typically on installations where regular analog cameras are setup in place.

This cable is ideal for this application because you will not need to modify anything in your cabling when adding HDCVI cameras and and HDCVI DVR.

You could also use Cat5 & Cat6 cable. This cable will need a different set of fittings such as RJ45 connectors. These fittings are the same type of connectors you will find on a regular Ethernet cable.

How can I identify HDCVI cameras from Analog, HDSDI Cameras & IP cameras?

HDCVI cameras have an extra pair of cables. These cables are color coded with a purple and white color. When connected together the video through HDCVI will stop outputting and then the camera is able to reproduce video over an analog DVR or handheld monitor. This is by design and is just intended to be used solely to adjust the camera while it is mounted and connected to a hand-held monitor.

ANALOG cameras have only 2 wires. These are mostly Power and Video. There are some cameras that will have an extra pair of wires and they are commonly used for PTZ controlling, while some other cameras use these cables to access the OSD menus of the camera.

HDSDI cameras will normally have 3 wires. Two BNC wires and 1 connector for Power. One of the BNC connectors output analog signal, and this will allow you to connect the camera to an analog DVR or handheld monitor. The second BNC connector will allow you to connect to an HDSDI DVR and it will only display HD video through those kind of devices. The third connector is power.

IP cameras will have 2 wires also. These will be an RJ45 style connector and a power connector. Some IP cameras are able to be powered over RJ45 with a single cable. They will be able to distribute power, data and control.

HDCVI, HDSDI, Analog and IP Connectors.

Refer to the following sample pictures to learn the differences between these connectors:

HDCVI Camera Connectors

HDCVI Camera Connectors

HDSDI Camera Connectors

HDSDI Camera Connectors

Analog Camera Connectors

Analog Camera Connectors

IP Connectors

IP Camera Connector

HDCVI Installation and Configuration

There is not too much involved when installing HDCVI cameras. There is no need to configure any IP address, ports, etc. For installations where there is pre-existing Siamese cable, the procedure is very simple as you just need to replace the analog camera and installing the HDCVI camera in its place.

One of the most notorious features of an HDCVI camera is the fact that the video data, audio and RS485 controls is transmitted over the same cable. Our HDCVI cameras have an OSD (On Screen Display) menu that can be accessed to configure features of the camera video such as brightness, exposure, sharpness, Frames, etc.

To access the OSD, simply connect the camera in the desired channel of your HDCVI DVR and begin to configure the RS485 communication in the DVR on the channel where the camera is connected. An example to this is if the camera is connected on channel 1 then you will need to configure the RS485 settings of that channel. Same thing will occur for any other camera you connect to the DVR.

The following settings will need to be configured in the DVR in order to establish communication with the camera’s OSD. Follow the screenshot below:

Go to: Main Menu>Settings>Pan/Tilt/Zoom and make sure these settings are there.

Pan-Tilt-Zoom

Another exceptional feature and hassle-free with HDCVI cameras is that when configuring the RS485 control feature on each camera it is not required to change the address or baud rate on each camera, making it extremely easy to install and configure all the cameras without interference.

After you have applied these setting to all the channels then it is time to test the RS485 communication with the cameras and DVR. To access the OSD of the camera, simply right click on the channel you want to open the Pan/Tilt/Zoom Controller:

Right Click Pan Tilt Zoom
Page Search
HDCVI main Menu

Navigate through the OSD of the camera using the arrows of the controller, and then if you want to change a value or a feature simply click the right arrow to change values. You will also notice that some of the menus have an arrow in it. That means there is a sub menu that you can access and change settings. To access the sub menus simply click the (ENTER) button and the new menu will appear. To go back menus select the (BACK) option and click enter to go to the original Menu.

Configuring the DVR and its settings

There are a few things we will need to tweak to make sure we get accurate recordings. You can do this using the Setup Wizard as well as doing it manually.

Login to the DVR by right clicking on your mouse and select Main Menu. A prompt for your username and password will appear.

You can use the 888888 or the admin to configure your DVR and the password will be the same as the users name. After you have logged in the MAIN MENU window will appear.

HDCVI main Menu2.jpg

Next click on SETTINGS then GENERAL.

HDCVI General Setting

Under the GENERAL settings make sure the system time is set correctly based on your Time Zone. Make sure you click “SAVE” after changing the time. Next you can change the Date Format to MM/DD/YYYY. You can also set the Time Format to 12H or 24H if you like. Here is a screenshot of the general settings:

HDCVI Schedule2

Next we can see the schedule of how your DVR will be recording. Under the SETTINGS page click on SCHEDULE Then the following window will appear:

HDCVI Schedule2

If you would like to change the settings of the schedule to Motion Detection (MD), then you will need to uncheck (Regular) and just check (MD) for Period 1. Click on “Copy”; click (All) to apply these settings to all of the channels. Next click the Drop Down arrow under “Period” and select (All) to apply these settings to every day of the week. Click OK when you are done.
At this point your DVR should be recording based on motion event only and you can make sure this is happening by seeing the following icons on the screen:

HDCVI Motion

Indicates motion is occurring when is displayed.

HDCVI Encode Icon

Indicates that the DVR is currently recording an event. This will stay ON until motion ends.

Next setting to configure and one of the most important ones is the ENCODING (Camera Resolution). Under SETTINGS click on ENCODE and the next window will appear:

HDCVI Encode

All of our DVRs, NVRs and IP cameras have the capability of recording at different resolutions, FPS and Bit Rate based on Events, either Motion Detection, Continuous recording (Regular) or an Alarm. The left column is called Main Stream and the right column is called Extra Stream or Assistance.

Lastly you can configure the sensitivity of the camera by going to SETTING and select DETECT.

HDCVI Detect

NOTE: DO NOT click on “Copy” on this section because all of the settings will be copied to channel one, making the DVR not recognized motion on any other channel .

Here you can change the sensitivity of each camera, activate email notification, enable tour and even show a pop-up message when motion occurs on any channel. Always remember to save your settings.

I hope you find this article intuitive and helpful.

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Why the new HD-CVI technology may be the future of security camera systems.

Written By:
Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

As video technology continues to improve with time, it makes sense that the public continues to express a growing interest in security cameras that can reliably provide better video quality then was possible in the recent past. Here at Techpro Security Products we are constantly upgrading the CCTV products that we offer our customers in order to stay on the cutting edge of the industry. This also means that we can provide an array of equipment that lets you select the surveillance solution that best fits your budget and security requirements. Because of this effort we are excited to now be offering HD-CVI (High Definition Composite Video Interface) surveillance cameras and DVRs to our customers.

HD-CVI complete security camera system.

Until very recently, IP cameras were the most common equipment that someone purchased when they wanted to get megapixel quality video from their security camera system. This type of network based CCTV system still offers the highest resolution available today but the new HD-CVI is closing the gap. There are also some issues with installing IP cameras which mean that installing them can be a little more challenging.

An issue that has to be faced when someone is doing an installation with IP cameras is the fact that they require a significant amount of bandwidth. You may face this issue both inside and outside the network where they’re installed. This can occur inside the network because the video signal is being transmitted from all of the cameras to the recording device or NVR though the internal network. This significant bandwidth usage can also be a problem if you are trying to remotely connect to the NVR from outside network where it’s installed, unless your Internet service provider is supplying you with high upload speeds. Configuring these IP cameras to work within the network where they’re installed can also be a daunting task for anyone that doesn’t have a good understanding about how networks operate.

The HD-CVI technology lets the camera send video to the DVR for recording as a digital signal. The unusual part is the fact that the video signal does not need to be transferred through a network. This allows you to record megapixel quality video through any of the cabling options that have been typically used with analog security cameras installations for decades.

HD-CVI Cable Options

With this type of CCTV system you are able to use RG-59 or RG-6 (these are types of coaxial cable that is commonly with analog security cameras), standard CAT5 cables with baluns or prefabricated “plug and play” cables to carry the video signal from security cameras to the recording device. RG-59 will offer you the highest quality video; while CAT 5 cable will offer video that is approximately 5 to 10 percent lower quality then RG 59 and the prefabricated “plug and play” cables offer about 5 to 10 lower video quality then the CAT5. Most professional CCTV installers will use a type of wire that is called Siamese cable for most security camera installs. This cable consists of RG 59 and two 18 gauge wires for power transmission all joined into one wire by a tough insulation wrapped around the exterior of these cables.

This new type of surveillance system lets you run the cables for the cameras a longer distance from the DVR then either IP cameras or the HD-SDI technology will allow. Both IP and HD-SDI cameras are limited to transmitting video a distance up to 333 feet, while using the new HD-CVI technology allows you to transmit video up to 1,500 feet. It’s important to note that the distance that you can run power for these cameras is still subject to the same restrictions as the other types of cameras that are currently on the market. Once the power for a camera has traveled over 100 feet then the voltage begins to drop off. If the power goes far enough beyond the 100 feet then the voltage will drop to the point where the camera will not get enough power to operate correctly. This is true with either AC or DC power supplies.

HD-CVI is low cost

One aspect of this technology that is sure to capture the attention of experienced installers and the end users doing their first install is the fact that the cost is incredibly low compared to other existing video transmission formats. Even though this technology offers such high video quality, the price is very close to the older analog security camera systems and it’s significantly less expensive than either an HD-SDI system or a network based IP camera system. An HD-CVI security camera system will also save you a considerable amount of time and money because no matter what type of cable you use with them, they are able to transmit video, audio and the signal for controlling the camera’s OSD (or On Screen Display) over a single line.

HD-CVI Resolution

These cameras can offer 720p resolution right now but a 1080p version of the HD-CVI cameras are scheduled to be released around the end of the year. When these 1080p cameras some out they will be compatible with the current HD-CVI DVRs. The maximum resolution that analog security camera technology are limited to is 960 x 480 pixels. Once the 1080p cameras become available then a HD-CVI security camera system will offer 450 percent higher resolution then the maximum resolution of the older analog technology is able to provide. A 1080p camera actually captures video that is 1920×1080 pixels.

720p Example

HD-CVI is also something to consider if you want to upgrade an analog system to the point that it will give you megapixel quality video. Upgrading to this type system will allow you to simply replace the cameras and the DVR. The existing power supply and wiring will work great with these upgraded devices. Not only will upgrading your system in this way save you the cost of buying these items again but it will also be much easier and quicker, since running the wiring for a security camera system is the most labor intensive part of the process.

This new technology represents a substantial breakthrough in security camera technology and it is not widely available yet. As a matter of fact, SecurityCameraKing.com is one of the few places that you can purchase it the United States. Below is a link where you can find these new products.

http://search.securitycameraking.com/psearch/svc/search.php?uid=4&q=cvi

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SecurityCameraKing.com – From a Dealer Point Of View

Written By:
Wednesday, April 9th, 2014
8CH-HD-CVI-Domes-Bullets

Why buy from SecurityCameraKing.com

When you deal with SecurityCameraking.com, you will discover a new experience from a Security Camera distributor. I discovered this as a dealer for Techpro Security Products (The manufacturer and distributor of Security Camera King’s products. In my 40 years in the business, I had never found the level of professionalism, service, and quality found here. Need a quote? You will have it in minutes, instead of days, which is quite common with other suppliers. Need a shipment to go out fast? Same day shipping is the norm here, not two or three days later. Export? We do that, no problem. Worried about quality? In three years of working as a dealer for Techpro Security Products, I never had a bad DVR, and only one bad camera. This was out of literally hundreds shipped. The company claims an RMA rate of 1%, but my experience was better than that. Have a tech question? I have NEVER worked with better-trained techs in all my years. The sales people can answer most questions. The experts in the tech support department will quickly handle the tougher ones. In a very unusual arrangement for a company in this business, there are more techs than sales people. Because client service is such a vital part of the company’s ethos, we are growing and expanding to better serve our growing customer base. Yes, we always want to get that first order, but subsequent orders are far more important. That is the key to success. Excellence in product, service, and client satisfaction is our goal. We really understand that it is far easier to lose a customer than it is to get a new one, so we work hard to keep all happy.

As new products become available, we will carefully research, test, install, and abuse them. If they meet our rugged requirements, we will adopt them. Every one of the staff will be trained in the products, so when it becomes available, you can be sure that your questions will be answered intelligently. We will be bringing new products in regularly. Our latest is HD-CVI, a new technology that allows megapixel resolution over co-ax cable with long cable runs of over 1500’, compared to 300’ max for IP and HD-SDI. And, pricing is a good bit less than IP or HD-SDI. As it is so new, we have a limited product line now, but much more is coming. As they say, “Stay tuned!”

Where can you learn more about Security Camera Products?

As part of our drive for client satisfaction, we provide many tools to help you with use and installation of our products. Search Youtube for Security Camera King- You will find 299 videos that we have placed. Product descriptions, technical data, installation tips, troubleshooting, even some entertaining ones. A few are even scary, like a motorcycle crash in front of our building (caught on our 1.3mp bullet camera!) You can spend a lot of time on Security Camera King’s YouTube Channel, to your benefit. There are areas on our retail website, www.securitycameraking.com that are also packed with educational materials. Go to CCTV Learning Center, go in and check it out. We strongly feel that an educated customer will be the best customer. A truly unique area on our website is customer reviews of our products. And, no, these are not faked! In the event that we get a negative review, it will go up. I have not seen that yet.

Tech Support

Another area where we provide you with more is what happens if you have a challenge on an installation. Our tech team is happy to stay on the phone with you until everything is right. They can link directly into the system to make necessary adjustments or corrections. No charge for this service and it is available to you forever. This is a service that is just not found. As a former installer, I have unpleasant memories of being on terminal hold, waiting for a tech, and then finding out that he could not / would not help. Oh, if that product is out of warranty, we will still help you. I don’t think anybody else offers that service.

We understand that camera systems can be confusing and even intimidating. Don’t worry about it. Give us a call, we will talk. Newbie or old pro, no problem. We will explain the different technologies that are available and suggest the best solution for your application and budget. We will not try to upsell you just to add to the price. If we suggest something, there is a real reason for it. And we will take into consideration your level of expertise, or lack of it. Don’t worry about seeming unknowledgeable, we will be happy to help. We have solutions for just about any application. We have protected everything from corner stores and modest homes, to large scale military locations and DEA and CIA locations.

Going Global

Our clients span the globe: US, Canada, Mexico, Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada, Barbados, Bermuda, Panama, Puerto Rico, Guyana, Grenada, Germany, UK, Spain, Italy, Australia. I hear some very interesting accents! Yes, hablamos Espanol. E Portuguese, tambem!

We are currently in the process of expanding our offices and warehouse. One aspect of this will be extensive video demonstration walls, highlighting our products, showing exactly what can be expected. This will be finished out in April. So, if you happen to be in Boca Raton, Florida, escaping the Frozen Northlands, or just on your way to the Keys, come on over to see our products and staff. We are easy to find, just two miles off I-95. The coffee is pretty good too.

Wrapping it all up

When you are considering a video system, it is very important to understand what you are getting. We only deal with professional level equipment. We have less expensive units, to be sure, but none can be considered consumer grade. In contrast to what is sold in the big box stores, all our products are built to a performance goal, not a price goal. You will get all that wonderful service I have explained, which you will never get from the consumer product resellers. Your security investment will be safe and will return benefits for a far longer time. Your satisfaction is secure. Some are tempted to bring cameras in direct from China. Yes, they are a lot cheaper. Support? Non-existent. Shipping delays? Yup. Real quality? One dealer that had used a Chinese supplier said he always had to add extra units to his order because of the failure rates. THAT headache will not happen here. Do it once, do it right.

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The Science Behind HD-CVI

Written By:
Friday, April 4th, 2014

HD-CVI System

High Definition Composite Video Interface (HDCVI) is a brand new video transmission applied science in the CCTV world. This technology allows high definition video footage to be transmitted over coax cable at considerably longer distances than network based cameras. The overall cost of the HDCVI cameras are lower than most network cameras as well to further enhance their staying power.

The main feature that makes HDCVI cameras images so vibrant is the signal itself. The HDCVI technology modulates the image signal then transmits by using both base-band and quadrature amplitude modulation. Base-Band is a word that details signals that range of frequencies from zero hertz to a cut-off frequency or highest frequency signal. Digital base-band signal transfers the digital stream over baseband channels, normally an unfiltered wire such as coax.

Baseband Transmission

Quadrature amplitude modulation differs in implementation as QAM uses both analog and digital modulation. It can use either two analog signal messages or two digital streams. This is accomplished by modulating the amplitudes of the two carrier waves. QAM high efficiencies can be achieved by setting size limited by the noise for communication channels. Another way of describing QAM is the amplitude of the two carrier waves are 90 degrees out of phase with each other in quadrature. Making the way the signals are carried equivalently viewed as both while being phased modulated into a single carrier.

Quadrature

This new way to apply the science QAM effectively separates the brightness signal and hue to enhance image quality. Also the separation of the signals diminishes the cross talk or external radiation that interrupts the signal.

Currently the two camera types available are 1920H and 1280H which translates to 1080P and 720P respectively. These cameras are using a technology that is actually a group of technologies used as one called Auto Signal Compensation or ASC. A video signal such as the standard NTSC (National Television System Committee) has different synchronization pulses used for the receiver scan timing. The features of a waveform are in the details of the synchronization. Synchronization occurs in the video lines of the sequential scanning of horizontal lines starting in the upper left corner then going right until all lines are scanned. The operation will happen hundreds of times depending on how many TV lines. Once modifications of the horizontal sync are complete vertical synchronization waveforms are initiated. The actual shape of the wave form is affected in this application, ultimately giving an extremely vibrant color display. If you take the anti-interference ability of the HDSDI science and compare it with the HDCVI, the HDSDI is fairly poor when operating in a high frequency radiation areas. Radiation by definition is electric magnetic waves. This is considerably different than nuclear or thermal radiation. Electro-magnetic waves come from all electric devices. A standalone air-condition unit is a perfect example. The AC compressors inside puts off enough electromagnetic interference to scramble the video signals traveling down the coax cable should the lines be too close. By separating carrier waves and changing their shape the signal becomes resilient to interference.

Another aspect of the signal usage was a realization that other signals can be embedded in the blanking zone. Blanking interval was originally designed to blank out the receiver to allow time for retrace in the receiver.

It’s first implementation was the closed captioning system in TV for example.

Closed_Caption

We can now use the vertical blank for something else called two-way data communication. The end to end transmission can support features for PTZ control. Other non PTZ cameras that support RS485 control can be used. These cameras’ OSD menu can be accessed without having to run extra control wiring same as the PTZ. You will no longer have to pull extra cable for PTZ control either. Originally installers would use Cat5 cable to get around that old limitation on the analog systems. I would use a pair of wires for video. Another pair of wires for RS485 control. Then splice the remaining 2 pairs to have 2 wires for positive and 2 wires for negative on power supply. That is a nice little work around, but at long distances that does not work as single strand wire is not thick enough to carry the amps needed. With the new implementation of ASC it makes communication for control available.

HDCVI equipment is similar to HDSDI equipment in that you can you use RG6 or RG59 and not have any problems. You can use you standard connectors without any special requirements or the need to find obscure vendors for the connectors. Using standard cabling and connectors will allow for the same level of ease for installation as legacy CCTV cameras.

Comparing HDCVI to HDSDI both technologies can transmit an image at resolutions of 1080P and 720P. For distance of signal transmission the HDCVI has an enormous advantage over HDSDI. HDSDI can reach about 100 meters or 320 feet. HDCVI can transmit up to 500 meters or 1600 feet. To put those numbers into perspective HDSDI can have the camera at one end of a football field and the DVR at the other end. HDCVI can reach 5 times as far. If you have a huge piece of property you need to get High definition cameras HDCVI is the way to go. Of course keep in mind power for the cameras are subject to the same restrictions of older technologies when it comes to alternating or direct current electricity.

HDCVI technology uses a peer to peer type of transmission. This means there is a continuous transmission with no creation of packets such as in IP based cameras. IP cameras are subject to the normal rules of data transmission. That means packets are created then transmitted over the Ethernet cable. The packets need to arrive in the correct sequence and be spaced evenly apart.

Packets

Issues with network congestion, configuration mistakes, and improper queuing for the data stream will result in choppy and degraded video display. Those issues are inherent of an IP based system. There are extra steps an installer can take to reduce the jitter problem, but that takes advanced knowledge of the cameras themselves as well as advanced knowledge of networking in general.

To recap the HDCVI cameras do operate much better than IP camera systems or HDSDI systems. The HDCVI provide mega pixel quality like the HDSDI and IP cameras. They are not subject to the same outside interference the HDSDI devices are or IP systems. HDCVI have able to go 5 times the distance for video transmission than HDSDI or IP. The new technology is as simple to use as legacy equipment is. Lastly you get Mega pixel quality at analog camera prices.

If you would like to know more about HDCVI, how it compares to IP and Analog and how to connect the system together, check out our What is HD-CVI page.

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The Differences Between HDCVI and Analog CCTV Security Camera Systems

Written By:
Thursday, March 27th, 2014

When it comes to closed circuit television or CCTV systems, there are lots of different brands and types of systems to choose from. I am going to cover the differences between standard analog systems and HDCVI or High Definition Composite Video Interface (analog’s replacement in the near future). For the price of a high-end analog CCTV system, you can get an HDCVI system that will knock your socks off!

Analog Closed Circuit Television System

Analog System

Analog camera systems are the vast majority of camera systems on the market that are in use by the typical surveillance consumer. The best way that I can describe what the footage from these cameras looks like is the typical 7-11 robbery video that you see on the nightly news. With a standard analog camera system, the highest resolution you will get is 960h or 928×480 and most will only produce a standard D1 resolution of 704×480 or essentially 480i. This is equivalent to what television stations broadcast up until June of 2009. After the transition, all “full-power TV Stations” went into broadcasting HD. One of the best examples of the quality of the new transmission is before the change all the news personalities never had to worry too much about their complexion, after the change you could see the pores on these people and the makeup artists had to start working overtime to deal with the added details in their clients.

With a traditional closed circuit camera system, you will typically have a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) for encoding and storing of the video. A cable from the DVR location to the camera location, typically either a plug-and-play premade cable or a Siamese cable; there also could be an Ethernet cable with baluns used as well. A balun simply converts an Ethernet cable to a standard BNC connection; some can also send power and audio over the same Ethernet cable. A power supply is needed to power the camera from the DVR location. A camera with a BNC connector on it typically is under 700TVL or 700 TV lines.

Some of the higher end analog systems have great picture quality and are suitable for some people on the market, but with the fact that as a society, we have grown to expect better definition on any image or video we see. Over time, we will look back on analog camera systems the way we look back at vintage footage.

HDCVI Closed Circuit Television System

HDCVI System

Now you are probably wondering what the heck, another acronym in the security industry! HDCVI actually stands for High Definition Composite Video Interface, but think of it as high definition over any cable type. With HDCVI you will currently be able to get 720p high definition video, with 1080p resolution video in the very near future. While you can technically run HDCVI over any existing security camera cabling that has copper in it, the better the cable the better the results you will see. Let me explain that a little further. To receive the absolute best picture out your HDCVI system you should use either RG59 or RG6 Siamese cable. With most RG59 and RG6 cables on the market, they have more copper in them than most other cable types, and the shielding that surrounds the core helps to prevent interference from outside sources. The next best cabling method would be Ethernet cable (Cat5e/Cat6), preferably a high quality, with baluns. This is because with all the options of cabling this is the second best cable as far as copper content. You can use standard Plug and Play BNC cables, but keep in mind that the better the cable the better the video.

With HDCVI camera systems, you do get the same truly closed circuit television system that you are used to with an analog system, unlike what you get with an IP megapixel camera system. What that means is that all the cameras come directly back to the DVR (Digital Video Recorder) which is where the video is encoded and stored on the internal hard disk drive. This isolates the cameras from the network unless you have the unit connected to the network. Even when the system is connected to the network, it is protected by a three failed attempt lockout. What that means is that even if someone finds the system, if they fail three times on guessing the password, the system locks the account from access and continues to keep on operating as normal. It just helps to prevent unauthorized access to your surveillance system. With the fact that the DVR is doing all of the encoding, this helps to prevent lag in the video. What that means is that what you are truly looking at is what is going on in real time and not having the second or so delay from the live shot to what you are seeing. This is typically a downfall in an IP megapixel camera system. Another advantage of HDCVI camera systems are that all the OSD (On Screen Display), PTZ (Pan Tilt Zoom) control, and audio can be transmitted over the single coaxial cable that is also sending the video from the camera to the DVR.

In conclusion, if you are looking for a new security system, you can go with different options. You can go the traditional analog camera system route and have it be obsolete in a year or so. You can go with an HD-SDI (High Definition – Serial Digital Interface) camera system, which will give you some temporary benefits over HDCVI right now, but will be obsolete in a few years. You can go with an IP megapixel system that will give you the ability to constantly upgrade over the years. Alternatively, you can go with an HDCVI system which has some minimal limitations on the resolution at the time being, but this is the technology that will wipe analog and HD-SDI camera systems off the market. The cost of these HDCVI systems are only a few dollars more than a high end analog system.

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