Posts Tagged ‘ HDCVI’



Security Camera Comparisons

Written By:
Friday, November 7th, 2014

Security cameras are becoming significantly more prevalent in our society every day. This increase is due in part to the technology behind them getting better and better all of the time. As these improvements take place, the cost is also coming down at about the same rate. Because of all of these improvements in security camera technology there are far more types and styles available to the consumer today then every before and this variety can easily confuse even a tech-savvy buyer. In this article we’re going to take a look at the assortment of designs and features that are offered with some of the surveillance cameras on the market today and provide you with some useful information that should help you make the decision of which camera will work best for you. It will serve as a useful guide on security camera comparisons

That first thing that you should consider when you’re buying a security camera is whether it will be mounted outside or indoors. All security cameras are designed to work inside a structure but only a portion of them are designed to work outside, in the elements. Indoor cameras are usually less expensive, weigh less and are made with lighter materials. Surveillance cameras that are designed to be mounted outside are usually made of a stronger material, such as metal or a thick plastic, and sealed in such a way that they will keep moisture and debris out of the delicate internal electronic components to varying degrees. There is a rating system, called the IP code, which will help you determine what level of protection that a camera provides and allow you to choose the camera that will work best in the environment of your installation. This rating system is too complicated to explain in detail here but it’s a good idea to make sure that you use a camera that has an IP66 rating for outside installations. This means that the camera’s housing will protect the more delicate parts of the camera from dust and jets of water.

There are variations in the way that security cameras are built, both functional and aesthetic, that are a consideration when deciding what type of camera will work best for you. There are basically four different styles of cameras: box, bullet, dome and PTZ. There are a few differences in these types of cameras in the manner in which they can be mounted and where they can be installed.

A box camera is usually a rectangular camera that needs to have a separate lens attached to it. These lenses are available in a wide variety of zoom levels and are usually larger than those in other types of cameras. These larger lenses allow more light to be processed by the camera, resulting in a higher quality image. If box cameras are installed in an outside environment, they will also need to be mounted inside a housing to help protect them from the elements. These cameras are highly noticeable and because of this, they are effective in the role of a criminal deterrent as well as providing high quality video footage. The lenses for these cameras can be built with a varifocal lens, which means that you can manually adjust the level of zoom to suit your needs.

Box Camera
Box Security Camera With Lens Attached

A bullet security camera is a surveillance camera that has an oblong or cylindrical shaped housing, which is fixed to the mounting surface by some sort of an arm. These cameras allow you to easily mount and adjust them to the desired field of view. Bullet cameras are often designed for indoor and outdoor installations, but it’s still a good idea to check the IP code rating if you’re planning to use them outside. Unlike box cameras, bullet cameras can be designed with infrared (IR) lights around the lens of the camera. This IR lighting is triggered with an internal light sensor, so that the camera will be switched to IR mode once the lighting levels drop below a certain point. Once the camera is in this mode it will be able to show video in complete darkness.

Bullet Security Camera
Bullet Security Camera

A dome camera has a bulbous shape to it and can be mounted on most flat surfaces. This design offers the highest level of vandal resistance, which means that these security cameras make it very hard for anyone to tamper with them after they’ve been mounted. This type of camera is also available with infrared lighting built in to it so that it doesn’t need a visual light source to be able to record video for you. Dome style cameras are available in models that are designed to be mounted indoors exclusively or models that can be mounted indoors or outside.

Dome Security Camera
Dome Security Camera

Another type of surveillance camera that is very popular these days is a called a Pan Tilt Zoom camera or PTZ. This type of camera allows you to get the camera to pan around horizontally, tilt up and down vertically, and zoom in and out. All of these abilities are controlled from the DVR or over the Internet depending on the type of DVR you have and how it’s configured. These cameras are available in indoor and outdoor versions with widely varying magnification levels that can include both mechanical and digital zoom functions. PTZ cameras offer you the ability to have a look around the area where it’s mounted while you’re away from it. Some of them even have an auto tracking feature which will let it follow movement automatically.

Pan Tilt Zoom Camera (PTZ)
Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Security Camera

All of these styles of security cameras are available in two different signal standards that have been around for years – Analog and IP. There is also a third signal standard that has arrived on the scene recently that is called HD-CVI.
Analog cameras have been around the longest of the three types and are still the most common. These cameras have BNC connectors for video, and they can use a few different types of cables to connect them directly to a DVR and some form of power supply. BNC connectors are circular with two small posts that lock the connection in place.

IP cameras have also been around for years now, but they are still newer than analog cameras. They are connected to a network through a standard network cable, either a CAT5 or CAT6 cable. These cameras are capable of megapixel resolution but can put a stain on a network’s resources unless the network is designed to handle significant bandwidth or a separate network is built for multiple cameras of this type.

HD-CVI cameras are the newest type of signal standard. These cameras are capable of delivering megapixel quality video footage and the video signal doesn’t go through a network. The cameras for this type of security camera system use BNC connectors and RG59 to transmit the signal to a DVR specifically designed to work with this type of camera. You can learn more about this amazing technology and the specifics of what HDCVI is here.

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CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Written By:
Thursday, July 24th, 2014

CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Today there are a lot of options when it comes to choosing a quality CCTV security system. You may decide to go with a traditional analog system, HD-SDI, HD-CVI or even an IP network based security products.

One thing all of these options have in common is you will probably have to run some sort wire to the cameras. Yes, there are some “Wireless Security Camera” solutions available on the market today, but if you do some research you will find that there are a lot of limitations to wireless security cameras. Most CCTV professionals would probably not recommend a wireless system in an environment where up-time and security are critical.

install

I do want to mention that it is possible to reliably transmit video wirelessly using a device such as the TP-LocoM5 – Wireless Access Point/Bridge as seen here at www.securitycameraking.com.

But even then you would still need to have a power wire run to the camera or a local power source near the camera and it only works with IP Cameras.

That being said, we will be talking about a fully-wired system in conjunction with a storage device such as a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) or NVR (Network Video Recorder).

NEW INSTALLATION
When installing a completely new security system you may want to have the video and power wires come from a single location located near the storage device (DVR or NVR) as shown below.

ANALOG SYSTEMS
Analog, HD-SDI and HD-CVI cameras will need two wires run to them. One for video transmission and a set of power wires in order to power the camera. You could run a coax wire and separate power wires but most CCTV professionals choose to use “Siamese Cable”. Siamese Cable is a manufactured coax cable with a set of power wires attached to it. The power wires can be split off from the coax in cases where your power source may not be in a close proximity to your recording device.

Siamese-Cable

NETWORK IP SYSTEMS
IP cameras use digital video transmission over CAT5 or CAT6 cable. In most cases you run your video and power to and from the camera on the same CAT5 or CAT6 wire, assuming you are using a POE (Power Over Ethernet) power source such as a POE injector or POE Switch.

Some NVRs come with built in POE,  but in most cases it is recommended to use an external POE switch like the POE-8MB1G from SecurityCameraKing.com. When using an external POE switch all of your CAT5 or CAT6 will run directly from each camera to a POE switch that is connected to your local network. Then you simply connect your NVR to the network and you are all set.

POE-Setup

Most IP cameras also come with an additional power wire if you choose not to use POE and power them with 12v or 24v power as shown below.

IP-Cable

If you are going to power your IP camera with 12v /24v power  you will still run all of your CAT5 or CAT6 from the camera to a Non-POE switch (usually significantly less expensive than a POE switch) but you will run an extra set of power wires from a power source to each camera.

NO-POE-Setup

RUNNING YOUR CABLES

Now it’s time to run your cable. The following will cover 2 popular scenarios.

Scenario 1: Running your cable through your attic and mounting your cameras to the soffit. This is a common installation option, provided you have access to your attic and your soffits are also accessible.

First you have to choose the placement of you recorder and power supply. Some people simply have them located in an office or a room within their home.  Others prefer having them in a more secure location such as in a lockbox, hidden in a closet, or even in the attic itself.

The image below shows the recorder and power supply inside a room of the home. Power and video wires run up the wall into the attic to the location where the camera will be located and out a small hole in the soffit were the camera will be mounted.

sOFFIT

Scenario 2: Another option is to run your cable through an exterior wall and then use conduit on the exterior of your structure to run your cables from one camera to another. This is a great option for those who do not have an attic or limited access to one.

Junction

Mounting Your Cameras

Once you have run your wires to the desired location you can connect your camera. In some cases where the cables are coming out of the soffit it is possible to connect your wires together and tuck the connections up into the hollow area of the soffit, then mount the camera directly to the soffit.

Direct-soffit-mount

In situations where you’re running your wires through a solid concrete or brick wall that the connections cannot be tucked into, it is common to mount a junction box.

Junction

Junction Boxes and Conduit
Junction boxes are particularly useful when running your cable through conduit on the exterior of your structure as they serve as a weather proof container protect your power and video connections from the elements and also provide you with a flat surface to mount your cameras to.

Box1

First you will pull your wires through the access hole on the back of the junction box. Then mount the junction box to the wall. You may have to drill a hole in the junction box cover big enough to feed your camera connections through. Next, connect the camera to the power and video connection(s). Then screw the cover on to the junction box. Now you can mount you camera to the junction box. See the diagram below.

JB

When used on a soffit, a junction box will sometimes be helpful in order to lower and drop your cameras below obstructions such as deep fascia boards as shown below.

obstruction

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How to Configure the OSD (On Screen Display) of an HD-CVI security camera

Written By:
Thursday, May 8th, 2014

The following instructions will allow for fine adjustments of Security Camera King CVIOB-EL1MPIR50 and CVIOD-EL1MPIR50 HD-CVI security cameras on DVR-CVI4120M and DVR-CVI8240M HD-CVI DVRs.

1. Click on the right mouse button to open the DVR options and select Main Menu.
Login as an administrator we are using the default username 888888 and password 888888

HDCVI-1

2. Hit enter after inputting the username and password

HDCVI-2

3. After you enter the menu below will appear, click on setting

HDCVI-3

4. Once in the setting menu, click on Pan/Tilt/Zoom

HDCVI-4

5. Select the Channel (camera) you would like to access the OSD menu to.
6. Control Mode Select HDCVI
7. Protocol DH-SD1
8. Click on save to save all the settings
9. Click the right mouse button until you are completely out of the menu

HDCVI-5

10. Once you are back on the main screen of your DVR click on the right mouse button and the menu options should come up.
11. Then select Pan/Tilt/Zoom

HDCVI-6

12. The Pan/Tilt/Zoom menu box will come up, click on page switch

HDCVI-7

13. Continue to click on page switch until you reach the menu pictured below

HDCVI-8

14. To enter the OSD menu of the camera click on Enter Menu as pictured above
15. The camera OSD menu will come up as shown below, to navigate the menu use the up, down, left and right arrows. In menu options such as Exposure you will note it has a sub-menu. When highlighted as in the picture below you can click on the Enter button to enter the sub-menu

HDCVI-9

16. When done configuring the options go down to exit and click on the enter button. This will take out of the camera OSD menu.

Things to know about HD-CVI, HD-SDI & IP security cameras and recorders

Terms, abbreviations and definitions
1. High Definition Composite Video Interface or HD-CVI- Is a new video technology that supports 1080p and 720p resolution. Because it is a low frequency video signal, standard RG59 coax up to 1,600 feet can be used.

2. High Definition Serial Digital Interface or HD-SDI- Was originally used for TV production and was adopted by the CCTV industry to deliver high resolution video 1080p or 720p. Due to the HD-SDI high frequencies sometimes up to 2.2 GHZ the use of RG59 is limited.

3. RG59 coax- is used for low voltage video signals such as security cameras, short video cables for cable boxes and satellite receivers.

4. RG6 coax- is used for digital signals that required 50 MHZ or higher. Used primarily for HD video and audio signals.

5. POE or Power over Ethernet – allows you to have a network connection and receive power from a single Ethernet cable. So on a POE camera setup you only need a single cable to transmit video, audio and power.

6. DVR or Digital Video Recorder- converts an analog signal and converts it to digital to be stored on a storage device such as a hard drive, SD card or USB flash drive.

7. NVR or Network Video Recorder- Records already encoded video from the IP camera (no encoding is done by the NVR) and stored on the hard drive, SD card or USB flash drive. HD-CVI uses P2P (Peer to Peer Protocol) instead of an encoding decoding method between IP Camera and NVR this change in transmission between the camera and DVR allows for a smoother and more reliable image. In addition a built in low frequency modulator reduces high frequency interference created by cell phones and WIFI routers normally seen in IP and WIFI cameras.

Because of the way HD-CVI transmits you can now have extended cable distances on standard RG59 up to 1600 FT @720p and 980 FT @1080p. Where on IP based systems you have a 330 FT. Maximum and can vary based on POE switches and power outputs. On HD-SDI the Maximum distance using RG6 3GHZ quad shield is 500 FT. and standard RG59 300 FT can vary on quality of cable.

The added benefit to HD-CVI is you can still get HD video quality and not spend as much as you would with the IP setups. You can choose between a 720p or 1080P HD-CVI security cameras and both work with the same HD-CVI DVR. Below is an example of the HD-CVI @ 720p V.S IP @ 720p

SECURITY CAMERA KING – HD-CVI @ 720P

HDCVI-720p-Sample

SECURITY CAMERA KING – IP @ 720P

IP-Camera-720p-sample

Both images from above were are still images captured from our DVR-CVI8240M HD-CVI DVR and our NVR-ELM-16 NVR. As you can see both images have similar video qualities the only differences are the price and length of the cable runs.

HD-CVI is also beneficial for people that already have preexisting analog systems and want to upgrade to a HD system. There is no need to run new cables unlike the HD-SDI which required RG6 or the IP systems that require CAT6 cables. This alone can save you a few hundred dollars for a 4 camera install and 1000+ on an 8 camera install.

Below is a comparison Chart of what it would cost for an 8 camera HD-CVI, HD-SDI and IP system (accessories not included such as cable and power) for each type of setup.

COMPARISON CHART UPGRADE COST FROM AN EXISTING ANALOG SYSTEM to HD-CVI, HD-SDI or IP

The estimates are not 100% accurate and are based. This is just an example

HDCVI-HDSDI-IP

As you can see on a basic install the difference between HD-CVI and HD-SDI is $887.00, the comparison between HD-CVI and IP is $702.19. For those looking to get into HD playing field and are looking to save money HD-CVI is the way to go. Everything has been made easy by Security Camera King so your install process is easier and more economical.

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How to configure an HDCVI Camera and HDCVI DVR

Written By:
Monday, May 5th, 2014

Technology is one of my favorite topics and when it comes to security equipment I chose to write about how it works and explain how easy is to work with one of our products we offer.

Today I will be introducing a new technology called HDCVI (High Definition Composite Video interface) and I will be demonstrating how this HDCVI DVR will change the way analog systems will slowly fall and the HD world will dominate the security system market.

What is HDCVI?

HDCVI (High Definition Composite Video interface) is an independent and proprietary technology where it is capable of transmitting High Definition Video over standard coaxial cable. Also, HD-CVI is capable of transmitting up to 2 Megapixel video over existing coax cable infrastructures up to 1600 feet without any third party repeaters Hardware; this provides a much better solution than HD-SDI which is limited to 300 feet transmission.

The following pictures will show you front and back panels of an HDCVI DVR 4CH and 8CH:

HDCVI DVR 4 Channel Back

4 Channel Back Panel

HDCVI DVR 8 Channel Back

8 Channel Back Panel

HDCVI DVR Front

Front Panel 4 & 8 Channel

What type of cable I can use?

HDCVI Cable_Connectors

HDCVI can be used with regular RG59 (Siamese Cable). This type of cable is found typically on installations where regular analog cameras are setup in place.

This cable is ideal for this application because you will not need to modify anything in your cabling when adding HDCVI cameras and and HDCVI DVR.

You could also use Cat5 & Cat6 cable. This cable will need a different set of fittings such as RJ45 connectors. These fittings are the same type of connectors you will find on a regular Ethernet cable.

How can I identify HDCVI cameras from Analog, HDSDI Cameras & IP cameras?

HDCVI cameras have an extra pair of cables. These cables are color coded with a purple and white color. When connected together the video through HDCVI will stop outputting and then the camera is able to reproduce video over an analog DVR or handheld monitor. This is by design and is just intended to be used solely to adjust the camera while it is mounted and connected to a hand-held monitor.

ANALOG cameras have only 2 wires. These are mostly Power and Video. There are some cameras that will have an extra pair of wires and they are commonly used for PTZ controlling, while some other cameras use these cables to access the OSD menus of the camera.

HDSDI cameras will normally have 3 wires. Two BNC wires and 1 connector for Power. One of the BNC connectors output analog signal, and this will allow you to connect the camera to an analog DVR or handheld monitor. The second BNC connector will allow you to connect to an HDSDI DVR and it will only display HD video through those kind of devices. The third connector is power.

IP cameras will have 2 wires also. These will be an RJ45 style connector and a power connector. Some IP cameras are able to be powered over RJ45 with a single cable. They will be able to distribute power, data and control.

HDCVI, HDSDI, Analog and IP Connectors.

Refer to the following sample pictures to learn the differences between these connectors:

HDCVI Camera Connectors

HDCVI Camera Connectors

HDSDI Camera Connectors

HDSDI Camera Connectors

Analog Camera Connectors

Analog Camera Connectors

IP Connectors

IP Camera Connector

HDCVI Installation and Configuration

There is not too much involved when installing HDCVI cameras. There is no need to configure any IP address, ports, etc. For installations where there is pre-existing Siamese cable, the procedure is very simple as you just need to replace the analog camera and installing the HDCVI camera in its place.

One of the most notorious features of an HDCVI camera is the fact that the video data, audio and RS485 controls is transmitted over the same cable. Our HDCVI cameras have an OSD (On Screen Display) menu that can be accessed to configure features of the camera video such as brightness, exposure, sharpness, Frames, etc.

To access the OSD, simply connect the camera in the desired channel of your HDCVI DVR and begin to configure the RS485 communication in the DVR on the channel where the camera is connected. An example to this is if the camera is connected on channel 1 then you will need to configure the RS485 settings of that channel. Same thing will occur for any other camera you connect to the DVR.

The following settings will need to be configured in the DVR in order to establish communication with the camera’s OSD. Follow the screenshot below:

Go to: Main Menu>Settings>Pan/Tilt/Zoom and make sure these settings are there.

Pan-Tilt-Zoom

Another exceptional feature and hassle-free with HDCVI cameras is that when configuring the RS485 control feature on each camera it is not required to change the address or baud rate on each camera, making it extremely easy to install and configure all the cameras without interference.

After you have applied these setting to all the channels then it is time to test the RS485 communication with the cameras and DVR. To access the OSD of the camera, simply right click on the channel you want to open the Pan/Tilt/Zoom Controller:

Right Click Pan Tilt Zoom
Page Search
HDCVI main Menu

Navigate through the OSD of the camera using the arrows of the controller, and then if you want to change a value or a feature simply click the right arrow to change values. You will also notice that some of the menus have an arrow in it. That means there is a sub menu that you can access and change settings. To access the sub menus simply click the (ENTER) button and the new menu will appear. To go back menus select the (BACK) option and click enter to go to the original Menu.

Configuring the DVR and its settings

There are a few things we will need to tweak to make sure we get accurate recordings. You can do this using the Setup Wizard as well as doing it manually.

Login to the DVR by right clicking on your mouse and select Main Menu. A prompt for your username and password will appear.

You can use the 888888 or the admin to configure your DVR and the password will be the same as the users name. After you have logged in the MAIN MENU window will appear.

HDCVI main Menu2.jpg

Next click on SETTINGS then GENERAL.

HDCVI General Setting

Under the GENERAL settings make sure the system time is set correctly based on your Time Zone. Make sure you click “SAVE” after changing the time. Next you can change the Date Format to MM/DD/YYYY. You can also set the Time Format to 12H or 24H if you like. Here is a screenshot of the general settings:

HDCVI Schedule2

Next we can see the schedule of how your DVR will be recording. Under the SETTINGS page click on SCHEDULE Then the following window will appear:

HDCVI Schedule2

If you would like to change the settings of the schedule to Motion Detection (MD), then you will need to uncheck (Regular) and just check (MD) for Period 1. Click on “Copy”; click (All) to apply these settings to all of the channels. Next click the Drop Down arrow under “Period” and select (All) to apply these settings to every day of the week. Click OK when you are done.
At this point your DVR should be recording based on motion event only and you can make sure this is happening by seeing the following icons on the screen:

HDCVI Motion

Indicates motion is occurring when is displayed.

HDCVI Encode Icon

Indicates that the DVR is currently recording an event. This will stay ON until motion ends.

Next setting to configure and one of the most important ones is the ENCODING (Camera Resolution). Under SETTINGS click on ENCODE and the next window will appear:

HDCVI Encode

All of our DVRs, NVRs and IP cameras have the capability of recording at different resolutions, FPS and Bit Rate based on Events, either Motion Detection, Continuous recording (Regular) or an Alarm. The left column is called Main Stream and the right column is called Extra Stream or Assistance.

Lastly you can configure the sensitivity of the camera by going to SETTING and select DETECT.

HDCVI Detect

NOTE: DO NOT click on “Copy” on this section because all of the settings will be copied to channel one, making the DVR not recognized motion on any other channel .

Here you can change the sensitivity of each camera, activate email notification, enable tour and even show a pop-up message when motion occurs on any channel. Always remember to save your settings.

I hope you find this article intuitive and helpful.

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How to Configure PSS to View Your New HDCVI Camera System

Written By:
Thursday, April 17th, 2014
What is HDCVI - Here is an 8 Channel HDCVI System

I often get asked what is the best method of viewing my new HDCVI camera system. My response varies and that is because not everyone has the same needs.  In my personal opinion, Techpro Security Products PSS (Pro Surveillance Software) is the best all around application for viewing a single unit or hundreds of units. One of the best things with this software is that it is my favorite four letter F word, FREE!  Another really nice thing about this software is that you can change almost every configuration of the recorder right from the software, so you can literally configure a hundred recorders without ever having to leave your computer and physically touch any of the recorders.

Another really nice feature of the software is that you can configure it to automatically launch at start-up of your computer and have it continue where you left off when you shut it down.  I find this to be a very handy feature, so that I don’t have to think about the layout of the cameras every time I open the software.

Getting Started

The first thing you will want to do is grab the DVD disc that came with your new HDCVI recorder. You will take this and insert it into the DVD drive of your computer.  This is what your screen should look like.

Once you put the disk in your computer, you will want to select the “Tools & Resources” folder to open.  Under here you will see this.

 

You will open the TechproSS-PC folder, which will give you these options.

Select and run the setup.  You will install this like any other program you install on your computer following all the prompts.  Once the program is installed you will see the PSS icon on your desktop.

Once you double click the icon, a Login box will appear.

Here you will be prompted to login to the software.  Incase your program does not automatically populate the username and password, they are defaulted as “admin” for both the username and password.  Note that it is in all lower case for both fields.

Once you are logged into the software, you will have a range of different options.  The interface will look like this.

Now the default look, will show a PTZ controller on the right side of the screen where my device list is showing.  I will go over how to change this later on in this article.   The next thing you will need to do is to add devices to your software.  On right side options, you will see “Config Manager”, this is where you go to add the devices.

Once you open the “Device Manager”, you will be able to add the device by the smart search option or by a manual add.  The smart search option, searches for Techpro Security Products devices that are on your network.  If the device is going to be accessed only inside of the network, this is the only way you need to add the device.  If you are installing the software on a laptop and plan on accessing the recorder remotely, then you will want to use the manual add option.  You will also want to make sure to use the EXTERNAL IP address of the location or the ddns account information.

On the screenshot above, you will notice that it is only asking for the username and password.
 
This is because I was using the smart search option and all the other information will be populated. The screen for the manual add is slightly different, but asks for this information as well.

Once the device is added to your list, you will be able to select the “Device List” on the upper right side of the screen.

When your device is logged in you will see a plus symbol to the left of the title of the device.  You hit the plus symbol and the list of cameras will drop down.  Now if you do not have the plus symbol it means that your recorder hasn’t logged in.  If you double click on the title, this will attempt to login to the unit.  Now if you are still not getting a plus symbol, watch for a slide up of information at the very bottom right of the screen.  This will be where you get the information for why the unit is not logging in.

 Software Configuration

Now that you have successfully inputted your HDCVI recorder into the software, we can now configure the software to make your life easy!  One of the first things that I like to do is to go into the Configurations at the very bottom of the window of the software.

Once you have clicked on the “Config” button at the bottom, you will need to select the “Option” option.  This will open the software configurations and look like this.

In this dialog box, you can have the software automatically login to PSS, so that you won’t be prompted every time you start the program for the username and password.  You can have PSS auto run when the computer starts up.  One big thing that you will want to make sure is selected in this dialog box, is the “Login all devices” in the upper left side of the box.  In here you can also have the software automatically start a “Task”.  A task is a specific set of cameras in a specific configuration that you configure.  To set up a task, you will go to the “Config Manager” section on the right side of the screen.

You will title the task to what will make sense to you.  Then you will select the amount of cameras that you are looking to have be displayed.  Once you have filled this information in, you will want to click “OK” to save the scheme task.  Now that you have the task saved, open the desired cameras in the appropriate window/s.  You will then right click with the mouse in one of the windows, and choose the option “Add All Windows To Task”.  This will have a pop out window that list the tasks that you have created, select the one that you want the current setup to be assigned to.

Now that you have the system up and operational, here are a few things that you can do with the system conveniently and easily.  You can pull footage from any of the connected devices, through the Playback button at the bottom of the screen.   You can configure which of the Tasks you want to run in the viewing screen under the Task button at the bottom of the screen.

You can control any PTZ that is attached to the system with the PTZ Direction section on the right side of the screen.

With the systems that are connected you can also change almost all the configurations of your recorder from this software, that you can do at the recorder itself.  To access the configurations of your recorder, you need to open the Device List on the upper right of the program.  You will then right click on the device you want to configure.  Select the Advanced option, which will have another sub-menu pop out.  You will then select on Device Config.

Once the configuration dialog box pops open you will see almost all the same options that you would see on the main menu of the recorder itself.  This is how I do most all of my configurations of my devices.  I honestly haven’t touched my recorders in years from being able to do everything remotely.

This software can make your life with your security system simple and actually pleasing, especially if you have multiple recorders deployed!

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