Posts Tagged ‘ IP camera ’

Setting up your IP camera surveillance system using an NVR with Two Ethernet Ports

Written By:
Monday, September 28th, 2015

The technology behind an IP security camera system is constantly evolving and there have been some nice improvements recently. Here at TechPro Security Products, we offer 3 types of systems including ones using IP cameras to provide the video. Although IP cameras may cost a bit more, they are also going to give you the highest resolution available on the market today. This article is going to explain how to set up this type of security camera system using a very useful configuration because some people are a bit intimidated by the networking involved.

There are several different ways that an IP surveillance camera system can be set up. This article is going to go over the type of set up which uses a NVR with two Ethernet ports. This configuration is great because it can be used to avoid putting an unnecessary bandwidth load on a network. All of the IP cameras that we carry give you megapixel quality video. The data involved in transmitting the video from even a one megapixel camera is fairly significant. If you are working with several of these cameras or ones that provide higher resolution (we now carry up to 12 megapixel cameras!) then transmitting all of that video will use an immense amount of bandwidth. This will cause the most common network to not function correctly. Not only can it cause the camera system to not work correctly, it will probably mean that nothing else will be able to use that network correctly. The solution to this is using the second Ethernet port to keep the data involved with the video transmission separated from the main network.

For the purposes of this article we’ll go over setting up a 64 channel NVR with 64 cameras using the dual Ethernet port method. This set up will require the following equipment.

64 ch NVR
A 64 channel NVR (Model# NVR-ELHS-64-4K-DH)

simple switch
A simple gigabyte switch (Model# Switch-5G)

A 16 channel POE switch. (Model# POE-16MB2GP)

An IP camera. (Model# IPOD-EL3MPIR50)

The first step in this type of setup is putting together a temporary configuration so that you can initialize each camera (see Diagram 1). You will need to have a computer, a POE switch and the NVR (using Ethernet port 1) all connected to the same router. You will also need to make sure that you have the NVR’s Ethernet port 1 configured to work with your network.

IP camera layout 1
Diagram 1

This layout will allow you to power each of the cameras and then log into them from the computer in order to get them set up to work with your NVR. The main thing you will need to do while logged into the camera will be to enable motion detection and assign the camera a unique IP address for the IP scheme that will be assigned to the NVR’s second Ethernet port. Changing the camera’s IP address is the last thing that you should do because you will not be able to access it from that computer once this change has been made and saved. There may be some other settings in the camera which will help to customize it for the application which you have planned for it. It’s also a good idea to label each camera with the IP address which you have assigned to it.

Once all of the cameras have been initialized, then they are ready to be set up in their final configuration (see Diagram 2). You will need to go to the network page of the NVR and choose “Multi-Address” from the drop down menu, this will allow each ethernet port to be set to a different IP scheme (for example – Ethernet port 1 can be set up to use the scheme and Ethernet port 2 can be set up to use This is a key feature in keeping the network which is handling the video transmission, from the cameras to the NVR, separate from the main network at the location.

IP camera layout 2
Diagram 2

At this point you should have Ethernet port 1 set to match the IP scheme of the main network, which will be used for remote connection. You should also have Ethernet port 2 set to a different IP scheme and all of your cameras set to unique IP address within that scheme (for example – Ethernet port 2 can be set to and each camera would be set to 10.1.1.x, where x is unique to each camera).

The last step is to get each camera assigned to its own channel on the NVR. This is done by assigning the IP address from a camera to the particular channel which you want to associate with that camera’s live video feed and its recorded video footage. This will be accomplished through the ‘Remote’ page of the NVR using one of two different methods depending on the model of camera that you are using (see picture 1).

If the camera is one of our EL models (for example – IPOD-EL3MPIR50) then the NVR will detect it through the ‘Remote’ page of the NVR’s menu system. Clicking on the ‘Device Search’ button will get the NVR to list any network devices which it can detect. Once that you can see that the camera has been detected then all you have to do is put a check mark next to the camera’s IP address and click on the ‘ADD’ button.

If the camera you are using is any other type then you will need to manually add it to the NVR. To do this you will first need to click on the ‘Manual Add’ button. Next, you will need to enter the camera’s IP address, user name, password and the ports that it is using for video transmission.

Picture 1

This type of IP camera system can be customized to suit any sized system. Our sales team can help you get the type of system which best suits your needs. Our tech support team is also available to help you get everything set up and running correctly.


Secure Your IP Camera . . . Please!

Written By:
Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

French writer, historian, and philosopher Voltaire said, “With great power comes great responsibility”. It appears that some that have great power through their knowledge choose to use that power irresponsibly.

It has recently come to my attention that there is a website on the Internet that allows you to see almost 10,000 IP Network Cameras that are using the default user names/passwords! These have not been secured with unique logon information and the host even has the Google Map coordinates showing approximately where the IP address of each camera originates. I realize that anybody who is really interested in doing this on their own could figure out how to do it but, this person has made it easy for perverts and potential criminals to see into people’s living rooms, bedrooms and businesses and potentially even take control of said camera. I’m not going to give the website name because I feel that would be promoting this site, and in the eyes of someone who works in sales for the security industry, I feel that would be irresponsible and I don’t condone it even though the host states that this is being done to bring the problem to light.

Many people think that the best way to keep their family or loved ones safe is to buy a baby monitor or security camera and possibly a DVR/NVR at one of those Big Box Stores or a Membership Club Warehouse and set it up so they can view it remotely on the Internet or their smart phone or tablet. I’m sure the initial intentions were good but now you have potentially opened your home, business or a family member’s home to the view of anyone with a computer! Maybe that’s the intention. Maybe you want to promote your business or make it so drivers can see traffic within your city. If that’s the case, then keep the camera open to all who want to view it but please change the user name and password from the default for the administrator so that all users have the ability to view the video but cannot make changes to the camera settings.


Beautiful Views of Denver

Don’t get me wrong. I think IP Network Cameras are amazing! I think that you can keep your property and the people you care about safer with them than without them. The ability to view true 1080p images is useful for monitoring your loved ones, your business, your property, your employees and it’s also useful because you can pair IP cameras with an NVR and produce a recorded image that is clear enough that you or the police can identify “The Bad Guy” if you should have a crime committed against you. You can put a flash drive into the USB port on the NVR, copy the recorded footage of someone committing a crime and hand that to the police for the most irrefutable evidence you can possibly provide if you have a quality camera and NVR/DVR!

If you’re concerned about cost then you should consider this. Those single wireless cameras will cost you approximately $70 online or at discount retail store. They offer you the ability to record on movement to an online service, the ability to pan/tilt and the ability to see images in the dark using infrared (IR) technology all at a low, low resolution of 640 x 480. If you’re just looking for a camera that you can hook up to your network and monitor, you don’t need a cheap camera with poor resolution. For $83.33 you can get an inexpensive alternative . . . a 2MP IP Bullet Camera with 20′ of IR or a 2MP IP Dome Camera with 20′ of IR AND get our top notch US based tech support department to help you set it up and secure it so that you’re not broadcasting it for the world to see!


Criminals Being Criminals

Having the ability to monitor certain situations is great and being able to save a 60 second clip like some of these low resolution cameras do will be fine for some situations. But, I still believe that the best case scenario is that you have an NVR with a large enough hard drive to store your video for a set desired amount of time. If you were to set up your own system to monitor your baby, elderly family member, home or business, you could do that using as little as one IP Camera, a mini 4 Channel NVR that has built in ports to power the cameras and a 1TB CCTV Hard Drive. With that, you can record using one camera that is recording 2MP or 1080p at 30 frames per second for 2 weeks at 24 hours per day.

Think of it as an investment in your family’s safety and your homes security. That NVR can grow as your family grows. You can add three more cameras and monitor other areas of your home. You can set one in the living room to keep an eye on the babysitter. You can add one in the home office to watch the gun safe or the liquor cabinet. You can put another one out by the pool to help you keep watch while the little ones are swimming. Whoever you buy from don’t buy the cheapest!


Watching Baby Sleep

The stories are rampant on the internet about hackers gaining access to baby monitors/cameras taking control using the web interface and SPEAKING to the children!! As a parent, that is absolutely horrifying! If your goal is to protect your family or property, you need to be proactive and do it the right way! I can’t think of any logical reason to use a product that has been proven to have technology that is prone to hackers having the ability to access your camera and view video transmissions that you intended for your eyes only and to actually take control of that camera!

My preference would be that you call us at 1-866-573-8878 and buy a security camera system to protect your family and property but if you don’t, please secure your IP Camera. Whether you buy it from us or not, I implore that you change your user name and password whenever you buy a product that will be hooked up to a network. Anything that has the standard default admin/admin password or anything similar should be changed to 8-10 (if allowed) characters that mix upper and lower case letters and numbers. Write it down, save it on your phone and protect yourself and what’s yours!


How to Connect an IP Camera to an NVR (Network Video Recorder)

Written By:
Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

For years, many customers have asked me what is the best way to to connect an IP camera to an NVR (Network Video Recorder). In this article, I will describe what I think are the best settings you should have in your NVR and IP cameras.

One thing I will recommend to you is to investigate how your network is laid out and have some knowledge of how many computers are connected to your network. This way, it will prevent any IP conflict when configuring the IP camera and the NVR security recorder. By default, all of our recorders will be set with a static and the majority of the IP cameras will be DHCP.

The easiest way to figure what to do at this point is to connect the recorder to the power supply that comes with the unit and then connect an Ethernet cable from your router to the Ethernet port of the NVR. After the unit turns On you will then need to go to the network settings of the NVR. Of course, you need to be connected to a monitor to see these settings.

Main menu

Most of our NVRs will have a new interface, the “blue interface”, and the menus will be spread out a bit different than the previous version. At this point you will notice that there are 3 parts of this window menu: The top is operation, mid is info, and bottom is setting. Go to network and the following page will display:

Dual Nic Art2

Depending on the type of NVR you have, some will have additional settings, but overall the steps are the same. We will be focusing on getting an IP address for the NVR. Click on DHCP, apply and save. You will be kicked out of that menu and in a few seconds your NVR will contact the router to get an available IP address.  Go back to the network settings to see what IP address you received. Normally what I will do is to set the IP address to a digit higher than what the NVR was assigned. This way I will avoid any IP conflicts in the network. Certain router’s DHCP settings will start from all the way to and it also depends on the network scheme and who configured the router initially. Assuming that the router’s scheme is within the numbers above I will set the NVR with the following IP:

Now that I have that out of the way the next thing to do is configure the IP cameras. In the past, all of our IP cameras used to be configured with this IP address: Many times customers and installers used to connect all the cameras at the same time without considering that it could cause a major problem when trying to assign an IP address to the camera or even to have the cameras show up in the tool finder (Config Tool). Nowadays most of our cameras are configured as DHCP. Therefore, if you have a router in the same network as the NVR, then most likely the camera will get an IP address from the DHCP pool setup in the router as soon as it is connected to the the POE switch that they will be connected to.

Here a snapshot of the config Tool:

Config Tool


Open the config tool and it should populate all of the IP addresses that your equipment got assigned from the network.


Assuming that each camera showed up in the tool, click on one of the IP addresses and a box will appear asking you for a username and password:

Config Tool Login

Click on login to access the camera’s IP interface:

Config Tool DHCP

If the camera is configured DHCP most likely it will show like the picture above. Noticed the IP address field along with subnet mask and gateway are gray out. Uncheck the DHCP option marked in red and now you will be able to change the last digit of the camera’s IP address to something different. Like I said before, I will change this camera’s IP address to and click save.

Config Tool Static

Now that we have assigned an IP address in the camera, it is time to access the camera’s settings and features. To do so, you will need to open Internet Explorer and begin to set up some of the features of the browser. Click on this link to follow step by step of how to setup this feature.

Type the IP Address of the camera on the address bar of your browser to access the web service. Once the web service comes up, input the username and password. The default username and password for our cameras is “admin”. After accessing the camera make sure the ActiveX files are installed. They will be needed to access and configure Video resolutions, Schedule, etc.

On the left side of the camera settings go to conditions to adjust the brightness, contrast, HUE etc. I normally leave these settings alone, and just change them depending on the environment.


Click on video to configure the resolution of the camera, Frames per second, Encoding, etc. This part of the settings is crucial because it has to do with the recording resolution. Notice that you have two columns: One label is Main Stream and the other is Sub Stream. In a nutshell, this is referring to recording streaming and viewing streaming. The Main Stream settings will affect how the camera sends the image to the NVR over the network, among other things; it will also affect recording quality and how many FPS (Frames per Second) your NVR will be able to use as each camera gets added to each of the NVR Channels.


NOTE:  DVRs have a maximum amount of FPS (frames per second) that they can handle. In the case of NVRs, the majority of them are restricted to an amount of  incoming bandwidth, which it makes certain NVRs to support higher resolutions. Although that is a true statement, I will never have cameras connected to the unit using the maximum bandwidth they can handle, because realistically a network can only handle so much data at one time. For those NVRs with a fixed incoming bandwidth, you will need to divide the advertised speed by the amount of cameras connected to the NVR to realize what bit rate each of the cameras need to be set at. Also, you most consider that the incoming bandwidth is shared also with the sub stream. So, on an NVR that supports 200Mbps for incoming bandwidth you will need to allocate 32 Mbps for the Sub Stream, so at the end you will have 168Mbps available in the Main Stream to stream and record.

Once you have decided how many cameras you will be adding to the NVR, it is important to configure the correct FPS, Bit Rate Type and Bit Rate.  For the Bit Rate Type I recommend “CBR” (Constant Bit Rate) instead of “VBR” (Variable Bit Rate), this way the camera will constantly use a predetermine amount of data you set under Bit Rate. The Bit Rate settings will vary depending on what resolution the camera is configured. For a 1080p resolution I will set the Bit Rate to 1024 (1MB) and the FPS to 15. This amount of data is more than enough to stream one camera at 1080p without loosing pixels.

Next we will set the Sub Stream settings. These settings will not affect recording video quality; instead it will affect the way the video performs over a smart phone while using our app TechproSS or TechproSS plus. This is mainly just for viewing purposes and should be set to D1 at 7 FPS or 10 FPS. The Bit Rate type is fine if we use CBR, and the Bit Rate can be set anywhere between 250 Mbps to 320Mbps. Also make sure the Enable option for this Stream is checked, otherwise you will not be able to view any kind of video while viewing the cameras over the phone or NVR local Interface. Under “Code-Stream Type”, click on the Drop Down and choose Motion. Noticed that the Encode Mode and Resolution are now gray out, and this means that you can only change the FPS and Bit Rate to affect how motion events occurs. These settings are ideal when recording based on Motion only, so you can have the Main Stream at a less intense setting and the NVR will record at a higher FPS and resolution when Motion happens due to these settings. Click Save when done.


Proceed to “Event > Video Detect”. In here we can enable the motion detection feature of the camera. Also, we can adjust the “Anti-Dither”. This acts like a delay to prevent false motion events. The higher the number, the higher the delay the camera will react to motion events. Right now, I like these settings shown in this picture:

Video Detect event

Next option is the Schedule. Click on “Storage > Schedule” and you can set now Motion recording for every day 24/7. Always remember to save your settings.


We are almost done configuring the camera. The last thing we need to make sure we have correct is the Time Zone and Date and Time. This is so the info will be displayed correctly in the NVR.  You can click on “Sync PC” button to get the Time and Date of your PC instead of doing it manually. DST is another option you could set up if you want the camera to change its time when the time changes occurs. NOTE: I will much rather to get DST configured over using an NTP server, because the NTP server works with the Time Zone of the Camera and the NVR. I have seen that I’m force to change the Time Zone when the time changes. Typically DST occurs the 2nd week of March and the first week of November every year, but is worth give it a try in my opinion. Check the internet for more details about the time changing based on a the upcoming years.


Lastly you could export all of these settings if you have many cameras to apply this to. The file containing the settings of the camera will not change the IP address of the camera so is safe to apply this to the cameras you are configuring.



Now for the last step after all of the cameras and NVR are configured, we will need to add the cameras to the channels of the NVR. To me the easiest way to do this is from a PC accessing the NVR over the network.  Open Internet Explorer and begin typing the Internal IP address of the NVR.

Go to Setup> Remote and you can click on device search. At this point the NVR will search the entire network and will display the devices for you to select them and add them to the NVR.

Remote Device

Device Search

Add cameras

At this point, after we add the cameras they should show up in the NVR web interface and the device list below:

Cameras added

Here is how the cameras will look in the web interface:


I hope this article will help you understand how this process works.


How To Install an IP Camera System

Written By:
Monday, September 8th, 2014

For decades analog cameras have been the standard type surveillance camera and these cameras function well but the demand of increased video quality grew over time. Even though there have been improvements to the video quality provided by this type of camera throughout the years, they still can’t come close to the megapixel video quality that IP cameras provide. This article will explain how to install an IP camera system.

IP cameras have been around since the late 1990s, but they have just become affordable over the last 3 or 4 years. There were also some great leaps in the reliability of this type of surveillance camera system at about the same time. These two factors are a big part of why IP camera systems have become drastically more popular over the last few years.

There are a few components that you will need to be able to install this type of security camera system. A network video recorder (or NVR), IP security cameras, CAT5 cables, a router and a switch are all necessary to get this set up correctly. Once you have all the equipment that you need, you’ll need to make sure that you physically connect everything the right way. First you should connect the router to your modem. Then connect your NVR, a computer, and a switch to that router. For this purpose its best if you use a Power Over Ethernet (or POE) switch because this switch is where you’ll be connecting your IP cameras and if you use a POE switch then it will also provide power to the cameras. If you do not use a POE switch for this then you will need to power your cameras in another manner. If you connect the router to the Internet and you have everything configured correctly you will also be able to interact with your NVR from any computer in the world.

When you start connecting the NVR and IP cameras to your network you will need to make sure that each of them are assigned a unique IP address that matches your network IP scheme. Each of these devices will need to be connected one at a time (starting with the NVR) to your network. The reason for this is because all of these devices have the same default IP address and if you have two devices that are connected to the same network with the same internal IP address it will create a conflict which will stop those devices from be recognized correctly.

The next step in this process is to go to the computer in order to find out some information about your network configuration so that you can make sure that the NVR is configured to work with your network. Once you are in front of the computer you will need to click on the Windows start button and locate the field that you can type in. Next you will need to open the command prompt by typing “cmd” in this field. Once you have the command prompt open then type “ipconfig” and it will display the default gateway and subnet mask (Image 1). You will need to enter this gateway and subnet mask on the network page of the NVR by going to the main menu>setting>network. The NVR’s internal IP address will have the same first three sets of numbers as the default gateway but the last set of numbers must be unique on the network where the NVR is connected.

Image 1

IP Camera Setup Image 1

The command prompt will also help you make sure that you assign an IP address to your NVR that isn’t already in use by another device in your network. Type ping, space and then an IP address that ends with a number between 2 and 254 in the small black window (for example -ping If you get any other response besides the one shown in Image 2 then the IP address is not in use by another device and is safe to assign to your NVR.

Image 2

IP Camera Setup Image 2

At this point in the installation process you will need to have the config tool installed on your computer. You can get this program from the CD that comes with any of the IP cameras or NVRs purchased from Techpro Security products. You can also download this program from, under the downloads tab.

Once you have the config tool installed you are ready to start connecting your IP cameras one at a time. This should be done before the cameras are mounted just in case you run into issues. After you connect the first camera, go to the config tool and hit the refresh button. At this point you should see a device with an IP address of show up in the config tool, if it has been connected correctly. Note – It may take up to 2 minutes for an IP camera to fully initialize.

You should double left click on the line with this IP address and then click on the “login” button. This will let you change the IP address, the default gateway and the subnet mask of the camera (Image 3). You’ll need to enter the network information that you found with the command prompt that was discussed previously in this article. You will also need to make sure that the last set of numbers in the IP address of the camera is unique on your network though the ping feature of the command prompt, using the same procedure that was also described above.

Image 3

IP Camera Setup Image 3

NVRs have two limited resource pools that you can’t exceed. One of these resource pools is the combination of the resolution and frames per second. The second of these pools is the combined bit rate of all your cameras. If you exceed these pools then the NVR will give you an error message and stop displaying at least some of your cameras. Because of this you will need to log into each of your cameras as they are connected and lowering the settings that deal with these resource pools below the levels that the will be working at once the installation is finished. Once all of your cameras have successfully been added to your NVR then you will raise the settings for resolution, frames per second and bit rate to the levels that you want your cameras to operate.

Now that the camera has been set up to work with your network you should connect to the camera from your computer so that you can lower the settings before adding it to your NVR. For this purpose you will need to use the 32 bit version of Internet Explorer and make the setting changes described above. Before you can log in to your camera you will need to go to tools>internet options>security tab>custom level. Once there you will need to locate two settings. They are “download signed activeX controls” and “download unsigned activeX controls” You’ll need to set both of these settings to prompt (Image 4) and then confirm the setting changes. If you are using Internet Explorer 11 for this, you will need to make an additional setting change by going to tools>compatibility view settings. Once you have this small window open add the IP address to the top portion of this window and hit the add button (as shown in Image 5), then click on the close button.

Image 4

IP Camera Setup Image 4

Image 5

IP Camera Setup Image 5

After all of these setting changes have been made in Internet Explorer then you should enter the camera’s IP address in the address bar of the browser and you will see the log in box soon after you confirm the activeX installation. Once you have logged into the camera you will need to click on Setup>Camera>Video. On this page you will need to lower the resolution to D1 and set the bit rate to the lowest option that you have available after changing the resolution (Image 6). You will also need to go to the video detect page by clicking on Event>Video Detect. On this page of the setup menus you just need to make sure that the enable box has a check mark (Image 7).

Image 6

IP Camera Setup Image 6

Image 7

IP Camera Setup Image 7

Now you have finished setting up the camera and the next step is to add it to the NVR. We’re going to talk about adding your cameras while interacting with the NVR directly but it is possible to set this portion of the installation up from a computer as well. First you will need to go to main menu then remote devices. Once you have that page open, click on the IP search button then you will see the camera’s IP address listed twice with the manufacturer for one being shown as Onvif and the other being shown as private, you should select the private one and add it to your NVR.

Now that you have one of your IP security cameras set up correctly you are ready to move on to the next one. You’ll need to begin repeating this process from the point where you connected the first camera. Once all of your cameras are up and running through the NVR then you will need to go to encode page of the NVR by clicking on main menu>setting>encode. On this page you will raise the resolution and set the frames per second to their operational settings. With most security camera installations you will not need to set all your cameras to operate at the same resolutions. The cameras that you have set up to provide overview shots will not need to have their resolutions set as high as the cameras that you want to provide you with a higher level of detail. As you’re raising the resolution levels you will eventually exceed the limited resource pool and at that point you will need to log directly in the camera using a browser and lower it a bit until you’re back inside the video processing capability of the NVR.


How to Stream an IP Camera to a Website – Creating your own Day Care Streaming Webpage

Written By:
Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Day care streaming

There has been a lot of people who have asked how to stream an IP Camera to a Webpage. Well here we go!

Lets start by gathering the software and Hardware that we will need.

  1. Unreal Media Server – Free Version is fine for a few cameras.
  2. WampServer – To host your webpage [optional]
  3. WordPress [pen source website creation tool written in PHP]
  4. Computer that will run this Software
  5. IP Camera [ EL series IP Cameras]

Lets start by setting up our camera.  For this article I will be using the IPOD-EL1MPIR50-W

We will be setting the camera up to monitor the front door. Keep in mind that we are just getting the camera’s feed directly from the IP camera and not from an NVR. This means that you will not be able to go back and review recorded footage, just the live feed from the Webpage.

My Camera is set to I will go ahead and install Unreal Media Server.

RTSP URl is : rtsp://

Replace the X’s with your Network Camera IP address

In this video you will see how to add your IP camera so that we can go from RTSP to RTMP using the Unreal Media Server and also stream it out.

What we need to do next is open some ports on your computer, in my case Windows 8.1

You will need to Allow Outbound Data from ports 5119 [Players]  and 5113 [Live Servers] on the Firewall Rules. For this you need to Open your Control Panel and navigate to Windows Firewall then click on Advanced Settings. This will open a new Window where you can add your Firewall Rules. Once you are in this new window you can add the rule by going on the left pane and clicking on “New Rule”. Then Tick the Radio Button, the one beside the “PORT” and click Next and then go and tick on the Specific remote Ports. Once you have done this, the area where you can specify the port number will allow you to add the port number that you need for Unreal Media Server. I am using the default which are the 5119 and 5113. At this point you are done with setting your Firewall Rules to allow outgoing Data from this application.

Great! We have finished these steps. Now since we are going to Host our own webpage we are going to be using Wamp Server. Wamp will allow you to Develop as well as Host your Domain name. Keep in mind that it is best to get a Domain name with a company that will allow for Dynamic IP Updates such as If not you will have to have your ISP give you a static IP. This is done so that the ISP will not change your IP address so when navigating to your domain/webpage your visitors do not end up in limbo as the address has changed. For example it is like setting your GPS to go to 123 Johnson street and all of a sudden your house is not there and now it is in 129 Johnson street .

Lets get started!

Download and Install Wamp onto your computer.

Open the Setup File and click next and accept the agreement. Then select where the WAMP folder will be residing. The default is fine. Tick the boxes to get your Shortcuts, click next and then install. In some cases it will ask you for the default web browser which is fine, then select your PHP mail Parameters. Default is fine, Localhost and your email address. Once you do this the application should start and if it does not, launch it using the Short Cut in your Desktop.

Once you have installed WAMP onto your computer you want to configure some settings before you can host your Web Page.

For this we will be navigating to the WAMP icon on the Tool Tray. Right-click on the icon and click on “Apache” then select “httpd.conf open”, this will open up a file.

It is easier if you choose to open it with Notepad ++. This will show the file in its structure versus notepad, as notepad might clump everything together and you end up either corrupting the file or making the wrong changes.

You want to click on your keyboard CTRL and F at the same time to open the Finder. Make sure that the file is selected and your cursor is on another application. Once you have opened up the Finder tool you want to input the following “servername”. Once you have located this on the document you want to change port 80 to 8080.

After doing this open again the Finder tool and search for “Listen”. Once you have located this, you want to find and change the line “Listen 80” to “Listen 8080” and also make sure that the “#” is removed. This means it is enabled.

Save the file and restart all services by clicking on the Wamp Icon on the Tool Tray. Once it has restarted, open your Web Browser and Navigate to http://localhost:8080/phpmyadmin.

Error 403 Forbidden

If it gives you the Following Error “Forbidden”, you want to go and modify a file called phpmyadmin.conf in “C:\wamp\alias”. Open it up with the notepad ++ application and make these changes.

Order Allow, Deny
Allow from all
Allow from localhost  ::1

Save the document and restart all services . You should be able to access PHP my Admin page on your Browser.

Now that we have everything set, navigate to http://localhost:8080/wp-admin. This will take you to the back end of Wordpess where you can edit your webpage. You can install your WordPress Theme. Once you have done this you can add a new page and this will be where you will have the camera feeds going to.

We are going to use some Javascript for this , let s get started

You can copy paste this into your Page.

After verifying my code, it seems that some of the elements from this Javascript, WordPress does not want to play the video feed. The way I found to bypass this issue is to grab this code and bring it up in Notepad ++ create an html file called “cam.html and upload it to the root of my webpage, once it was in there its a simple Iframe html code.

Once we have done all of this we need to go back to the java script code and make sure that the IP addresses are correct. You can also use a DDNS service if you don’t have a static IP on the script for example. . is a DDNS service provider. Keep in mind that they currently charge 8$ a year for this type of service. You can also get a Domain name with them for example and then point it to your router or PC. They have tools that will keep the Domain name with your current IP address. If you currently have a DVR/NVR/Hybrid or Tribrid and have a DDNS with us you can use the same one, but it is recommended to use a domain name that will show a instead of  just for cosmetic purposes and customers will like this.

Here is a Generator for the code if you are an advanced user.

Once we have done all of this your webpage should have your Camera feeds and we are almost done. Here is a quick video of a mock up Day Care Webpage.

We will need to Password Protect this page so that unauthorized users cannot view the camera feeds.

The easiest way to enable password protection is by going into the page and selecting the Visibility tab on the top right corner, tick the radio button and input the password.



Keep in mind that this password will be used by everyone.  There are other plugins that you can utilize but they are not going to be as effective as creating a file called HTaccess that will ask the user to input their username and password and you can simply edit this file with Notepad ++ and remove anyone at anytime giving them access or removing access to that user.

Lets get started with creating the .Htaccess file and .Htpasswd file.

Generator for the .htaccess

Generator for the .htpasswd

Above you will see the Generator that you can use to make your life easier.

In general what you need to create the files is open your Notepad ++ create a new file and name it .htaccess save it as Type “All Types” and this will ensure that the file is saved correctly.

Go and open the .htaccess generator and input the Name that you want to display on the pop up. I generally put something like Protected Area or Admin Only, essentially this is up to you. Once you have done that you want to input “\wamp\www\cam\.htpasswd”. You want to have the .htaccess in a folder where the cam.html is located this way when you navigate to the page it will ask for authentication. In my example here I have it in a folder called “cam” in my Wamp WWW root. Copy the generated code into the .htaccess and save.

Lets go and generate our username and password.  The generator will encrypt the password and add the username for example “jose:$apr1$Wuzi1i4C$XqqOLBCXu.vH3p1627X8r.” this is really Username: jose and password: jose . Enter the username on the generator and password copy/paste the results after clicking generate and paste this on the .htpasswd file. You can add as many as you like making sure that you leave an extra line on both the .htaccess file and .htpasswd file.

Test this by navigating to the webpage, it should ask you for the password. Do not be alarmed after you have successfully gained access and when you come again to the page it does not asks you for it. Some browsers will save the username and password automatically.

Here is a video of the Final Product