Posts Tagged ‘ ip cameras’



Where Should I Place My Security Cameras In My Business?

Written By:
Monday, September 8th, 2014

2 Megapixel Bullet Camera

Where Should I Place My Security Cameras In My Business? It would seem a rather simple question. Exactly what did you want to see? However yet, there are some elements to consider when designing your camera plan that you may not have considered. I have listed some of the things you might want to cover in a section by section breakdown that you can peruse on a “by application” basis.

Exterior Building Parking Lots: Clearly one of the most popular placements for cameras, parking lots can also be difficult to secure. They are often large areas where targets are undetermined to enter, exit, or travel. Additionally, you are often working with a number of unknowns and variables. This enormous unknown factor means you have to be prepared for something to occur anywhere within this large area. The use of pan tilt zoom, multiple varifocal, and megapixel cameras are common, and combining them is an even more effective way to cover your lots.

Exterior Building Yards: Yard areas are often where a company keeps some of their most expensive assets. Machinery, inventory, and other large and bulk items are kept in these yards. This can be a perplexing situation for security. Ideally cameras focused on specific areas, megapixel cameras, or auto-tracking cameras are excellent options, and of course, combinations of these are even better.

Exterior Building Perimeter: Covering the exterior entrances of a building can be tricky, and if possible shouldn’t be combined with cameras being used to cover yards or lots. The wider the angle of picture used to capture an area, the smaller the objects in that picture appear (and therefore yielding less detail). Therefore, for the sake of detail, you should use separate cameras for these purposes. Obtaining the largest, clearest pictures of persons entering and leaving a building or area is absolutely critical in many situations.

Exterior Building Zone Management and Security: No access and sensitive areas can be managed easily and cost-effective with the right cameras and recorder. Many recorders can be set to send you a text, email, or push notification if there is motion within a certain area of a camera’s field of view. Additionally, Pan Tilt Zoom cameras can be trained to change direction and zoom in and out if there is a motion activation in a certain area.

Exterior Building Vehicle Registration: Capturing vehicle information can be accomplished very easily. The key to this task is more a matter of camera proximity than type. Capturing vehicle information can be very useful to authorities in the event that something occurs on your property.

Interior Building Security: When considering interior camera locations, there are many considerations. Certainly you will want overviews of any area of interest, but there is more than just that to consider. You will want to cover your major entry points. In the case of your home, doing this with a covert camera may give you critical information identifying potential intruders unaware of the camera’s existence. In your business, a super high quality varifocal camera will give you a record of all who enter. You will also want to cover high importance areas with their own camera. Cash registers and counting areas, gun and cash safes, jewelry boxes, and theater rooms can all be perfect situations to place an additional covert or high end camera.

Interior Building Inventory Control: Clearly one of the most important purposes for cameras is to protect the valuables contained within a building. Placing cameras at high traffic areas creates a registry of people entering and leaving the area with inventory. Additional cameras placed in areas of particularly valuable or important items is always suggested as an additional way to account for those items. Another philosophy is to place a camera at the exits to monitor persons as they exit the building.

Interior Building Time Theft Prevention: Keeping watch of your time clock can be far more important than you realize. Its becoming more and more common to find that another employee has been punching the time clock on the behalf of their friend, or employees punching themselves back in from break and then returning to the break room. These are just a few forms of a new crime known as “time theft”. Essentially, its fraud. You could easily lose thousands of dollars at your time clock.

Interior Building Supervisory: Large area overview cameras are gaining popularity these days as well. These cameras assist the business owner in keeping tabs on their employees and the activities they are performing. They can be used to enforce and ensure safety policies are being adhered to, observing and training employees on the job, observing customers/clients for research on behaviors, and enforcement of rules, regulations and standards of your business. Lastly, interior cameras give you piece of mind by giving you the power to simply look and see what exactly is going on while you are away yourself.

Interior Building Monetary Assets Control: In any business there are precious investments that need to be secured. Everything from expensive machines or computers, to safes and registers, to raw inventory, to the very people in the business (customers and employees alike) has/have potential to be stolen or damaged. Keeping an eye on valuable assets is an obvious use for cameras.

Interior Building Entrant Registration: Even though this is the last entry in my camera locations blog, it may actually be the most important. A registry of entries and exits and a detail of the people of the persons coming and going could prove critical in the cases of many events. Placing a camera at each entrance that only views literally the space required to enter or exit the building, and raised to the optimal zone the people’s heads travel through should give you a nice big detailed picture of their face. When paired with an overview camera of the area, you can now track that person based on a) their apparel and look and b) simply going from camera to camera and tracing their movements. If that person is caught on recording stealing, vandalizing, or any other action of interest; you can now simply reverse through the footage until you get to the point where they had entered the building. At that point, you have that nice large image of their face. If there are other confined entry points (like other doorways) that allow access into areas of interest or importance or value, you could place other facial capture cameras as a way to make certain the person is the same, and to get more details about them.

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The Past and Future of Security Cameras in the Judicial System

Written By:
Monday, July 28th, 2014

Judicial-Image

zwani.com myspace graphic comments
Security cameras have been around since Woodstock. In the 1960’s banks all over the United States began using cameras for securing their perimeters. In the 70s, the Akai security system used a monochrome camera connected to a reel to reel VTR to preserve data. Later in the 90s multiplexing was introduced allowing the viewing and recording of multiple video signals, motion only recording and time lapse video. We all know what capabilities computers gave us for recording data to CDs, DVDs, Flash drives and large capacity hard drives.

Cameras Securing Court Houses

Sheriff deputies are usually guarding the court-house front. They count on instinct when judging someone’s character, whether it’s a high-profile criminal or an enraged victim. Court house guards need to have their eyes peeled at all times, and using CCTV camera systems is one of the real-time observation tools they use to accomplish this very difficult task.

court house scan

Security cameras have the responsibility to keep judges, lawyers, prosecutors, the public, inmates and reporters safe when attending all court proceedings. Monitoring these cameras are dedicated technicians looking out for the unexpected.  Bond hearings, motions, and sentencing can now be recorded and saved into the courthouse database. Security cameras also help to secure prisoners to and from the intake of the court-house.

Security Cameras in Jails

Using security camera monitoring in jails has been around for a while now. Older systems were composed of analog cameras wired to an analog TV monitor with no recording, then came BETA MAX and VHS/VCR tape recorders with NO long-term recording capabilities.

outside ptz jail

camera monitoring jail

Now in the new world we can record to hard drives that have virtually endless storage space. When there’s a conflict in question, the jail’s security camera recordings never lie. The security cameras allow 24 hour monitoring inside and outside inmate receiving, housing, cafeteria, elevators and every area that needs to be surveyed. Inmates are even going to court and seeing the judge via camera –to- monitor configuration. Visitation is dealt with a 2 way video and audio telephone system, you see the inmate through a screen and speak with a telephone.

House Arrest

House arrest is a different option for adult and juvenile offenders that have been arrested for a crime that qualifies the inmate under state and federal statues to be placed on some sort of monitoring system like an ankle bracelet or visits from certified state or federal officials to check on the inmate on a scheduled basis, questioning relatives, harassing landlord’s, employers and wasting time playing detective.

house arrest

I truly believe that Security Cameras are the future of offender supervision using new IP camera digital video and audio viewing and recording technology. It takes time, money, resources, approvals and a telephone line to monitor a House Arrest prisoner, using an Ankle bracelet that should be tamper proof, but if a criminal really knows what they’re doing, they can bypass the security by either slipping out of the bracelet or disabling the Bluetooth radio receiver unit.

probation girl

TechPro Security Products can now recommend a new and innovated thinking outside the DVR BOX and offer a cost, time and serious monitoring effective tool to get the job done. Its more than likely people tend to have Internet at their home then a telephone line, so installation of IP Supervision Cameras would be a breeze. Step 1 evaluate house arrest inmates internet status. Once established Step 2 a certified IP camera network specialist would install and configure the IP Cameras for the state or federal official to remote view, access and record to a secured cloud based server.

ip camera wirless

Adult and juvenile offenders arrested for crimes can have a term imposed on their bond, like not leaving the county or home, so the court elects home detention. Well what better way to monitor a person confined to their home then by using a camera design to supervise the accused person on release or bond. Imagine the peace of mind that the victim and bail bondsmen would have if they implemented IP Cameras mandatory installed in the offenders certified place of residence, or a sex offenders probation officer really knowing if his offender is telling the truth. Real Time Observation and recording is the answer. Safer, Braver and Stronger is the way to go.

dome ip

Probation and Parole

perol guy

Probation or Parole depending on a the state or federal prosecutors deal or contract, substitutes the inmates time in prison for close probation or parole supervision, but how is the probation officer supposed to supervise all those violators at the same time? TechPro Security IP Technology using IP Cameras to monitor Probation or Parolees is the answer. When offenders checking in is a hassle, you can observe violators under court ordered supervision at any time using TechPro Security PSS software. Is the Probation or Parolee drinking or partying, who’s really living at the supervised inmate’s residents and what friends are really visiting the Probation or Parolee? Offenders are more than likely to not invite BAD acquaintances over if their home is being monitored and recorded by a certified official’s server.

Sex Offenders

sex offender

Registered sex offenders classified as court ordered repeat offenders can now be monitored 24 hours a day 7 days a week using IP Security camera technology, all you need is Internet access at the registered sex offender’s home. Security cameras are a big deterrent, if you think someone is always watching you, you will be more than likely not to commit a crime. Probation and parole officers can now demand a pop up check in on demand via real-time IP Cameras at a local location, checking in with a probation or parole officer has never been easier. Security cameras monitoring pedophiles would increase children of all age’s safety.

Police Car Cameras

police car

Analog Cameras have been recording police evidence to tape recorders for years now, with all the new Megapixel technology cameras authorities can really use unedited and unaltered video and audio recordings real-time uploaded to the cloud for evidence. Lawyers and prosecutors have used police captured footage entered for evidence in big cases. The recorded footage helps eliminate any false accusations against the police officers and the detained individuals. Police cameras record events like DUI tests, police chases, speeding, auto accidents and arrests. Police cars now have cameras capable of scanning license plates for expired and suspended licenses. Mobile cameras have been recording streets and location points for Google map for years, mapping our city streets for GPS software. Cameras are even looking out for red light runners and traffic violators. K9 police and military dogs are even getting in on the wireless remote camera view, not excluding the new drone technology, that’s another subject in its self. The future of authorized supervision are IP Cameras.

police camerapolice car wifi

I can see the future of remote security access record and viewing. Imagine a business like a restaurant or bar that has a full security camera system that has been configured for remote access using an external IP address and there is a hold up and the manager hits an alarm or calls 911 and the data sent is accompanied by the external IP address of the business security camera system and the officer in route can pull up the cameras in the police cars laptop. The advantage of seeing the inside of a dangerous situation is priceless! If the criminal flees before authorities get there they still can view recorded footage and track the offenders direction of departure giving the police officer a heads up to track the suspects down. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for Security Camera Technology.

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CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Written By:
Thursday, July 24th, 2014

CCTV Installation and Wiring Options

Today there are a lot of options when it comes to choosing a quality CCTV security system. You may decide to go with a traditional analog system, HD-SDI, HD-CVI or even an IP network based security products.

One thing all of these options have in common is you will probably have to run some sort wire to the cameras. Yes, there are some “Wireless Security Camera” solutions available on the market today, but if you do some research you will find that there are a lot of limitations to wireless security cameras. Most CCTV professionals would probably not recommend a wireless system in an environment where up-time and security are critical.

install

I do want to mention that it is possible to reliably transmit video wirelessly using a device such as the TP-LocoM5 – Wireless Access Point/Bridge as seen here at www.securitycameraking.com.

But even then you would still need to have a power wire run to the camera or a local power source near the camera and it only works with IP Cameras.

That being said, we will be talking about a fully-wired system in conjunction with a storage device such as a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) or NVR (Network Video Recorder).

NEW INSTALLATION
When installing a completely new security system you may want to have the video and power wires come from a single location located near the storage device (DVR or NVR) as shown below.

ANALOG SYSTEMS
Analog, HD-SDI and HD-CVI cameras will need two wires run to them. One for video transmission and a set of power wires in order to power the camera. You could run a coax wire and separate power wires but most CCTV professionals choose to use “Siamese Cable”. Siamese Cable is a manufactured coax cable with a set of power wires attached to it. The power wires can be split off from the coax in cases where your power source may not be in a close proximity to your recording device.

Siamese-Cable

NETWORK IP SYSTEMS
IP cameras use digital video transmission over CAT5 or CAT6 cable. In most cases you run your video and power to and from the camera on the same CAT5 or CAT6 wire, assuming you are using a POE (Power Over Ethernet) power source such as a POE injector or POE Switch.

Some NVRs come with built in POE,  but in most cases it is recommended to use an external POE switch like the POE-8MB1G from SecurityCameraKing.com. When using an external POE switch all of your CAT5 or CAT6 will run directly from each camera to a POE switch that is connected to your local network. Then you simply connect your NVR to the network and you are all set.

POE-Setup

Most IP cameras also come with an additional power wire if you choose not to use POE and power them with 12v or 24v power as shown below.

IP-Cable

If you are going to power your IP camera with 12v /24v power  you will still run all of your CAT5 or CAT6 from the camera to a Non-POE switch (usually significantly less expensive than a POE switch) but you will run an extra set of power wires from a power source to each camera.

NO-POE-Setup

RUNNING YOUR CABLES

Now it’s time to run your cable. The following will cover 2 popular scenarios.

Scenario 1: Running your cable through your attic and mounting your cameras to the soffit. This is a common installation option, provided you have access to your attic and your soffits are also accessible.

First you have to choose the placement of you recorder and power supply. Some people simply have them located in an office or a room within their home.  Others prefer having them in a more secure location such as in a lockbox, hidden in a closet, or even in the attic itself.

The image below shows the recorder and power supply inside a room of the home. Power and video wires run up the wall into the attic to the location where the camera will be located and out a small hole in the soffit were the camera will be mounted.

sOFFIT

Scenario 2: Another option is to run your cable through an exterior wall and then use conduit on the exterior of your structure to run your cables from one camera to another. This is a great option for those who do not have an attic or limited access to one.

Junction

Mounting Your Cameras

Once you have run your wires to the desired location you can connect your camera. In some cases where the cables are coming out of the soffit it is possible to connect your wires together and tuck the connections up into the hollow area of the soffit, then mount the camera directly to the soffit.

Direct-soffit-mount

In situations where you’re running your wires through a solid concrete or brick wall that the connections cannot be tucked into, it is common to mount a junction box.

Junction

Junction Boxes and Conduit
Junction boxes are particularly useful when running your cable through conduit on the exterior of your structure as they serve as a weather proof container protect your power and video connections from the elements and also provide you with a flat surface to mount your cameras to.

Box1

First you will pull your wires through the access hole on the back of the junction box. Then mount the junction box to the wall. You may have to drill a hole in the junction box cover big enough to feed your camera connections through. Next, connect the camera to the power and video connection(s). Then screw the cover on to the junction box. Now you can mount you camera to the junction box. See the diagram below.

JB

When used on a soffit, a junction box will sometimes be helpful in order to lower and drop your cameras below obstructions such as deep fascia boards as shown below.

obstruction

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CCTV FAQ Part 2

Written By:
Thursday, June 26th, 2014
CCTV-FAQ

Learning about our DVR’s can help you better understand them and allow you to do the more advanced functions, but first you need to learn the basics. Not just the basics but also things that can make setting up the DVR an easier process. This CCTV FAQ is a continuation of last months article that will further explain these functions in detail. This article will go through basic functions like creating a new user and adding an IP camera, to more advanced functions like changing the IP of a camera and enabling tour. This article can be very useful for Dealers, Installers, and the average consumer. It helps explain simple tasks that you could only learn by earthier digging through the User Manual or through experience of using the device.

1. How to create a new user and apply permissions.

With surveillance equipment it is best to know who is accessing your system and who can access it. Creating different users with different permissions will help prevent any tampering and will help narrow down what people are using the device for. To start, the DVR comes with Users built in that can be used but the best thing to do is to start fresh and create all new users with the permissions that you want them to have. The way you do this is by going to Main Menu>Settings, and then Users. In this area you will see the different users on your DVR and by default there should be 4. To add a new one you just click Add User. Here you enter the users Name and Password as well as what group you want to place him under. These groups give predetermined permissions that can be useful if you set up the proper group. If you want to manually adjust a user’s permissions you can do that below. After you are satisfied with that specific user you can click save. If you want multiple users with the same permissions without have to adjust each one you can create a group. After you create a user account for everyone who will be accessing your DVR you can track and log all activity that is happening in realtime.

2. How to setup an IP camera to transmit snapshots to a FTP server.

Having IP cameras allow you to not only record to a NVR but it also allows you to record to a local or remote server. This allows you to use the camera as a standalone unit or to create off-site storage for extra security. It gives you the feature for when there is any motion on the camera it will upload a small clip or a snapshot to your FTP server. For this article I will be referencing the IPOD-EL1MPIR50. To start you need to log into the camera’s web service through Internet Explorer with its default IP 192.168.1.108 username: admin Password: admin. Once logged in you go to Setup>Camera>Video, and then Snapshot. There is a drop down menu next to Interval that will allow you to make the camera take snapshots every 1 to 7 seconds. On this page you can also adjust the quality of the snapshots. Just make sure you click Save at the bottom of the page to apply any changes you have made. After that you need to set up which days and time periods for the snapshots. On the Menu bar to the left click Storage>Schedule, and then snapshot schedule. Click the the setup button on the top right of the time bar and here you will be able to adjust those settings. Choose what days you want to have this feature set for and if you want it for everyday just click Select All on the upper left corner. If you want it based off motion you can just click save but if you want 24 hour then to the right of Period 1 click General.

Now that we have that set up we can configure the settings for connecting to the FTP server. Under Storage on the menu on the left click on Destination. Make sure that your in the Path tab located on the top. Under snapshot on the right side of the screen make sure that the Schedule box is the only one selected and then hit Save. Next select the FTP tab on the top of the screen so we can adjust the settings. To start, Server IP is where you enter the IP address of your FTP server that you are going to be connected to. If you are connecting from outside your network you are going to use your outside IP that your modem is using. Next Port is where you enter your listening port which is usually by default 21. Under username enter the username that is created on you FTP server. Then enter your password that correlates with that username. Last, under Remote Directory this is going to be the name of the folder the snapshots will be stored in on your server. As soon as you complete this step and it’s done correctly, your camera will start to transmit the snapshots to your FTP server. Based on how you set the time interval and whether you have it on motion or 24 hour.

This article was created to help people understand their DVR’s, NVR’s and cameras better so you can do more with your system without having to search through the whole manual to find or call tech support and take more time out of your day. We provide our technology to help make your lives easier, not more confusing. This is the one of multiple FAQ articles that will help you understand the basics of your devices. If you have a more complex problem please call our tech support line for further explanation at 866-573-8878.

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How to Connect Cameras to an NVR

Written By:
Wednesday, April 30th, 2014
NVR

Here at Security Camera King we have a variety of surveillance products that can help protect a home or business from crime. The products range from DVRs and NVRs to all the connectors that are needed to connect the cameras to the systems. Setting up a surveillance system DVR, which includes Analog, HD-CVI, and HD-SDI, tends to be easier to put together. When it comes to NVRs, they are working through a network and can be difficult if you don’t know what your doing. The biggest tough spots for this system are when connecting the system to your network, connecting your cameras to your network, and adjusting the frames and resolution of all the cameras to manage bandwidth and NVR load. IP camera systems are very advanced systems and if done properly can give the highest resolution in the industry.

Setting up an NVR has many steps before it can function properly. First things first is running cable for where you want cameras. Next is mounting cameras on a building or anywhere needed. After you have all of that done you can now properly connect your NVR to your network. You need to power up the NVR with the provided power supply and attach any necessary cable such as mouse for controlling the NVR’s interface, Power cable for built-in POE, Monitor for viewing the NVR’s interface, and lastly an ethernet cable that leads back to your router or a switch connected to your network. Now depending on how you want to manage your camera whether you want it on its own network or connected to your existing one there are different ways of accomplishing your goal. Setting up the NVR for earthier style is the same you need to assign a static IP address to your NVR so that you access it locally and remotely. The way to do this is by going to the “Main Menu” on the NVR (When doing this you will be prompted for username and password which is “888888” for both), then you need to go to “Settings”, and; “Network”. This is where you enter the IP for the NVR. By default the IP should be “192.168.1.108” and the “DHCP” should be unchecked. Now you can enter an IP address, Subnet, and Gateway of your network so that it has it’s own individual address on your network. This is all you have to do to set your NVR to your network and the next step is to start connecting your cameras to your network.

With the cameras mounted and the cable running to the destination of your choice either by your NVR or a spot in the attic/roof where your switch will be you can now start connecting your cameras to your network. Before you just plug all the cameras in at once you need to know what you want to plug them into. If you are just plugging them all into the POE built-in to the NVR then you can just plug in the cameras one by one till they show up on the NVR’s interface. This is the easiest way to connect cameras because as you plug them in, the NVR self-assigns an IP address to each camera. (This is only possible with our NVR’s and the EL Model Camera). Also when connecting your cameras this way makes the cameras only manageable by the NVR. If you are connecting your cameras to a separate switch then it requires a little more work. You have to connect the cameras in one by one just like before but before you connect another one you have to change the address for the camera. You can do this 1 of 2 ways, you can change it thought the NVR (This is only possible with our NVR’s and the EL Model Camera) or you can change it on the web interface built into the camera. The easy way is to just change it with the NVR. The way to accomplish this is after the camera and the NVR are connected to the switch, you search for the camera in the “Remote Device” section from the “Main Menu” and click edit next to the camera on the network. (Default is 192.168.1.108). After that is complete just repeat with every camera you want to connect. You can also adjust your color settings in this menu so that you don’t have to login to each camera and set it to the way you want. This can come in handy when you have a lot of cameras to manage. This is the process to connect your cameras to an NVR.

Now that the cameras are connected you need to adjust some settings on them to achieve maximum power out of you NVR. All the NVRs we sell have a certain number of frames or max bandwidth that it can handle. It’s important you know what the amount is because not all of them are the same. Once you figured out what the limit is you can adjust your cameras. To do so you need to go to the “Main Menu” on the NVR, “Settings”, and “Encode”. Here you can select the camera you want and adjust the frames and the resolution you want it to record at. You may also want to adjust the “Bit Rate” but you need to know what your doing or you can diminish your video quality. To copy this to other cameras in your NVR just adjust one camera the way you want and then click “Copy” and choose which cameras you want to copy the settings to. Under the same “Settings” menu you can adjust the schedule of when your camera records and if you want it to record 24/7, motion, alarm, or all three.

Compared to DVR’s, NVR’s are more difficult to set up. Setting up the IP for the NVR so that the NVR can be accessed locally and remotely. Connecting all the cameras to the NVR one by one assigning IP address to each camera. Lastly adjusting the cameras and NVR to get the most performance out of your NVR’s. Knowing these steps will make it easier to add an NVR for your surveillance needs

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