Posts Tagged ‘ nvr’



Techpro Security Products DVRs and NVRs – Overview of the New Menu System

Written By:
Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The menu system in all Techpro Security Products DVRs and NVRs has been very similar over the past few years, with little variation regardless of the model or the type of system that it’s designed to accommodate. The older menu system was great but recently several improvements have been made to it. Once an operator makes the adjustment to the changes then it’s easy to appreciate how the improvements actually make the system easier to navigate and operate. Hopefully this overview article will help you to understand and appreciate these changes.

After you have connected a monitor and mouse to the DVR or NVR and powered up the unit, the first thing you’ll see is the startup wizard (see Picture 1). The first thing that you should do is to cancel out of this feature.

Wiz
Picture 1 – Start up wizard.

Once that has been done you should right click anywhere on the screen. This will bring up a small menu (see Picture 2) and selecting Main Menu from the bottom of it will bring you to the log in box (see Picture 3).

popup menu
Picture 2 – Pop-up menu.

Clicking in the password field of the log in window will bring up a virtual key board. The user name is the default password – so the password for the admin account is admin. The password for the 888888 account is 888888. The admin account and the 888888 account are the only two that will give you full admin privileges. The default user accounts should never be deleted, although their passwords can be changed.

Log in
Picture 3 – Log in window.

Once you’re logged into the recording unit, the first page you will see is the Main Menu (see Picture 4). This menu page has twelve selection icons which are separated into three rows. The respective rows are labeled as Operation, Info and Setting. The first part of this article will be discussing the Operation row, which includes the Search, Backup and Shutdown selection icons.

Main menu
Picture 4 – Main Menu.

Search:
The Search page (see Picture 5) is where you will be able to view your recorded footage and export it if you desire. This interface will offer you several different ways to review your recorded footage.

Search
Picture 5 – Search Page

The first part of this page that you will deal with is the calendar (see Picture 6) in the upper right corner. You will need to select a blue day because these are the days where you have recorded footage.

The next step is to locate the drop down menus below the calendar. The tabs above the drop down menus will allow you to choose how many cameras will be reviewed at the same time. You choose which camera or cameras are reviewed with the drop down menu or menus.

Search calender
Picture 6 – Search calendar.

Once everything described above has been configured correctly, you should see colored sections show up along the search bar (see Picture 7), which is located at the bottom of the page. The type of recorded footage can be determined by using the color key located below the search bar. The bar is divided into 24 sections representing the hours of the day. Simply clicking anywhere in the colored portion of a bar will allow you to see your recorded footage playing.

Search bar
Picture 7 – Search bar.

The buttons (see Picture 8) below the area where your video will show up gives you a nice level of control over your playback.

Playback controls
Picture 8 – Playback controls.

Going from right to left on the control buttons, they will allow you to:

  • Play your video normally.
  • Stop your playback.
  • Play your video in reverse.
  • Step the playback backward frame by frame, once the video is paused.
  • Step the playback forward frame by frame once the video is paused.
  • Play the video slowly in the direction that it’s traveling. There are multiple speeds which can you access through clicking the button more than once.
  • Play the video quickly in the direction that’s traveling. There are multiple speeds which can you access through clicking the button more than once.

Backup:
This page of the menu system (see Picture 9) will allow you to export segments of recorded video to a thumb drive or other USB storage device which does not draw power through the USB connection. After such a storage device has been inserted in a USB port, the detect button is used to get the DVR or NVR to recognize it. Once this has been done you will see some information about the device will show up.

You can use the button which is labeled as ‘Format’ to prepare your storage device. It will be prepared with the FAT32 format style and this must be done before you can begin backing up your recorded footage.

Back up
Picture 9 – Backup page.

It is also possible to format the storage device through a computer. This is done by connecting the device to a computer and then going to the same page on your computer where you can see your CD drives and hard drives. You should see the recently connected device on this page and you will need to right click on it on order to see the format option.

Shutdown: (see Picture 10)
Selecting this option is the way that you should turn your DVR or NVR off. Turning a recorder off in any other manner has the potential to cause additional strain on the hard drive and possibly shorten its life.

Logout:
Selecting this option will log the user out of the menu system and lock it. It will not be possible to interact with the menu system again until you log in with one of the user accounts.

Reboot:
This is the selection that you should use in order to restart your DVR or NVR properly. It’s also a good idea to use this feature after you’ve made a significant amount of setting changes. When this action is performed, you will see a message indicting that the DVR or NVR is saving data displayed on the screen.

Shutdown
Picture 10 – Shutdown page.

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How To Install an IP Camera System

Written By:
Monday, September 8th, 2014

For decades analog cameras have been the standard type surveillance camera and these cameras function well but the demand of increased video quality grew over time. Even though there have been improvements to the video quality provided by this type of camera throughout the years, they still can’t come close to the megapixel video quality that IP cameras provide. This article will explain how to install an IP camera system.

IP cameras have been around since the late 1990s, but they have just become affordable over the last 3 or 4 years. There were also some great leaps in the reliability of this type of surveillance camera system at about the same time. These two factors are a big part of why IP camera systems have become drastically more popular over the last few years.

There are a few components that you will need to be able to install this type of security camera system. A network video recorder (or NVR), IP security cameras, CAT5 cables, a router and a switch are all necessary to get this set up correctly. Once you have all the equipment that you need, you’ll need to make sure that you physically connect everything the right way. First you should connect the router to your modem. Then connect your NVR, a computer, and a switch to that router. For this purpose its best if you use a Power Over Ethernet (or POE) switch because this switch is where you’ll be connecting your IP cameras and if you use a POE switch then it will also provide power to the cameras. If you do not use a POE switch for this then you will need to power your cameras in another manner. If you connect the router to the Internet and you have everything configured correctly you will also be able to interact with your NVR from any computer in the world.

When you start connecting the NVR and IP cameras to your network you will need to make sure that each of them are assigned a unique IP address that matches your network IP scheme. Each of these devices will need to be connected one at a time (starting with the NVR) to your network. The reason for this is because all of these devices have the same default IP address and if you have two devices that are connected to the same network with the same internal IP address it will create a conflict which will stop those devices from be recognized correctly.

The next step in this process is to go to the computer in order to find out some information about your network configuration so that you can make sure that the NVR is configured to work with your network. Once you are in front of the computer you will need to click on the Windows start button and locate the field that you can type in. Next you will need to open the command prompt by typing “cmd” in this field. Once you have the command prompt open then type “ipconfig” and it will display the default gateway and subnet mask (Image 1). You will need to enter this gateway and subnet mask on the network page of the NVR by going to the main menu>setting>network. The NVR’s internal IP address will have the same first three sets of numbers as the default gateway but the last set of numbers must be unique on the network where the NVR is connected.

Image 1

IP Camera Setup Image 1

The command prompt will also help you make sure that you assign an IP address to your NVR that isn’t already in use by another device in your network. Type ping, space and then an IP address that ends with a number between 2 and 254 in the small black window (for example -ping 192.168.1.110). If you get any other response besides the one shown in Image 2 then the IP address is not in use by another device and is safe to assign to your NVR.

Image 2

IP Camera Setup Image 2

At this point in the installation process you will need to have the config tool installed on your computer. You can get this program from the CD that comes with any of the IP cameras or NVRs purchased from Techpro Security products. You can also download this program from SecurityCameraKing.com, under the downloads tab.

Once you have the config tool installed you are ready to start connecting your IP cameras one at a time. This should be done before the cameras are mounted just in case you run into issues. After you connect the first camera, go to the config tool and hit the refresh button. At this point you should see a device with an IP address of 192.168.1.108 show up in the config tool, if it has been connected correctly. Note – It may take up to 2 minutes for an IP camera to fully initialize.

You should double left click on the line with this IP address and then click on the “login” button. This will let you change the IP address, the default gateway and the subnet mask of the camera (Image 3). You’ll need to enter the network information that you found with the command prompt that was discussed previously in this article. You will also need to make sure that the last set of numbers in the IP address of the camera is unique on your network though the ping feature of the command prompt, using the same procedure that was also described above.

Image 3

IP Camera Setup Image 3

NVRs have two limited resource pools that you can’t exceed. One of these resource pools is the combination of the resolution and frames per second. The second of these pools is the combined bit rate of all your cameras. If you exceed these pools then the NVR will give you an error message and stop displaying at least some of your cameras. Because of this you will need to log into each of your cameras as they are connected and lowering the settings that deal with these resource pools below the levels that the will be working at once the installation is finished. Once all of your cameras have successfully been added to your NVR then you will raise the settings for resolution, frames per second and bit rate to the levels that you want your cameras to operate.

Now that the camera has been set up to work with your network you should connect to the camera from your computer so that you can lower the settings before adding it to your NVR. For this purpose you will need to use the 32 bit version of Internet Explorer and make the setting changes described above. Before you can log in to your camera you will need to go to tools>internet options>security tab>custom level. Once there you will need to locate two settings. They are “download signed activeX controls” and “download unsigned activeX controls” You’ll need to set both of these settings to prompt (Image 4) and then confirm the setting changes. If you are using Internet Explorer 11 for this, you will need to make an additional setting change by going to tools>compatibility view settings. Once you have this small window open add the IP address to the top portion of this window and hit the add button (as shown in Image 5), then click on the close button.

Image 4

IP Camera Setup Image 4

Image 5

IP Camera Setup Image 5

After all of these setting changes have been made in Internet Explorer then you should enter the camera’s IP address in the address bar of the browser and you will see the log in box soon after you confirm the activeX installation. Once you have logged into the camera you will need to click on Setup>Camera>Video. On this page you will need to lower the resolution to D1 and set the bit rate to the lowest option that you have available after changing the resolution (Image 6). You will also need to go to the video detect page by clicking on Event>Video Detect. On this page of the setup menus you just need to make sure that the enable box has a check mark (Image 7).

Image 6

IP Camera Setup Image 6

Image 7

IP Camera Setup Image 7

Now you have finished setting up the camera and the next step is to add it to the NVR. We’re going to talk about adding your cameras while interacting with the NVR directly but it is possible to set this portion of the installation up from a computer as well. First you will need to go to main menu then remote devices. Once you have that page open, click on the IP search button then you will see the camera’s IP address listed twice with the manufacturer for one being shown as Onvif and the other being shown as private, you should select the private one and add it to your NVR.

Now that you have one of your IP security cameras set up correctly you are ready to move on to the next one. You’ll need to begin repeating this process from the point where you connected the first camera. Once all of your cameras are up and running through the NVR then you will need to go to encode page of the NVR by clicking on main menu>setting>encode. On this page you will raise the resolution and set the frames per second to their operational settings. With most security camera installations you will not need to set all your cameras to operate at the same resolutions. The cameras that you have set up to provide overview shots will not need to have their resolutions set as high as the cameras that you want to provide you with a higher level of detail. As you’re raising the resolution levels you will eventually exceed the limited resource pool and at that point you will need to log directly in the camera using a browser and lower it a bit until you’re back inside the video processing capability of the NVR.

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CCTV FAQ Part 2

Written By:
Thursday, June 26th, 2014
CCTV-FAQ

Learning about our DVR’s can help you better understand them and allow you to do the more advanced functions, but first you need to learn the basics. Not just the basics but also things that can make setting up the DVR an easier process. This CCTV FAQ is a continuation of last months article that will further explain these functions in detail. This article will go through basic functions like creating a new user and adding an IP camera, to more advanced functions like changing the IP of a camera and enabling tour. This article can be very useful for Dealers, Installers, and the average consumer. It helps explain simple tasks that you could only learn by earthier digging through the User Manual or through experience of using the device.

1. How to create a new user and apply permissions.

With surveillance equipment it is best to know who is accessing your system and who can access it. Creating different users with different permissions will help prevent any tampering and will help narrow down what people are using the device for. To start, the DVR comes with Users built in that can be used but the best thing to do is to start fresh and create all new users with the permissions that you want them to have. The way you do this is by going to Main Menu>Settings, and then Users. In this area you will see the different users on your DVR and by default there should be 4. To add a new one you just click Add User. Here you enter the users Name and Password as well as what group you want to place him under. These groups give predetermined permissions that can be useful if you set up the proper group. If you want to manually adjust a user’s permissions you can do that below. After you are satisfied with that specific user you can click save. If you want multiple users with the same permissions without have to adjust each one you can create a group. After you create a user account for everyone who will be accessing your DVR you can track and log all activity that is happening in realtime.

2. How to setup an IP camera to transmit snapshots to a FTP server.

Having IP cameras allow you to not only record to a NVR but it also allows you to record to a local or remote server. This allows you to use the camera as a standalone unit or to create off-site storage for extra security. It gives you the feature for when there is any motion on the camera it will upload a small clip or a snapshot to your FTP server. For this article I will be referencing the IPOD-EL1MPIR50. To start you need to log into the camera’s web service through Internet Explorer with its default IP 192.168.1.108 username: admin Password: admin. Once logged in you go to Setup>Camera>Video, and then Snapshot. There is a drop down menu next to Interval that will allow you to make the camera take snapshots every 1 to 7 seconds. On this page you can also adjust the quality of the snapshots. Just make sure you click Save at the bottom of the page to apply any changes you have made. After that you need to set up which days and time periods for the snapshots. On the Menu bar to the left click Storage>Schedule, and then snapshot schedule. Click the the setup button on the top right of the time bar and here you will be able to adjust those settings. Choose what days you want to have this feature set for and if you want it for everyday just click Select All on the upper left corner. If you want it based off motion you can just click save but if you want 24 hour then to the right of Period 1 click General.

Now that we have that set up we can configure the settings for connecting to the FTP server. Under Storage on the menu on the left click on Destination. Make sure that your in the Path tab located on the top. Under snapshot on the right side of the screen make sure that the Schedule box is the only one selected and then hit Save. Next select the FTP tab on the top of the screen so we can adjust the settings. To start, Server IP is where you enter the IP address of your FTP server that you are going to be connected to. If you are connecting from outside your network you are going to use your outside IP that your modem is using. Next Port is where you enter your listening port which is usually by default 21. Under username enter the username that is created on you FTP server. Then enter your password that correlates with that username. Last, under Remote Directory this is going to be the name of the folder the snapshots will be stored in on your server. As soon as you complete this step and it’s done correctly, your camera will start to transmit the snapshots to your FTP server. Based on how you set the time interval and whether you have it on motion or 24 hour.

This article was created to help people understand their DVR’s, NVR’s and cameras better so you can do more with your system without having to search through the whole manual to find or call tech support and take more time out of your day. We provide our technology to help make your lives easier, not more confusing. This is the one of multiple FAQ articles that will help you understand the basics of your devices. If you have a more complex problem please call our tech support line for further explanation at 866-573-8878.

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Simple CCTV FAQ’s

Written By:
Monday, June 2nd, 2014
QandA1

Learning about our DVR’s can help you better understand them and allow you to do the more advanced functions, but first you need to learn the basics. Not just the basics but also things that can make setting up the DVR an easier process. This article will go through basic functions like creating a new user and adding an IP camera, to more advanced functions like changing the IP of a camera and enabling tour. This article can be very useful for CCTV Dealers, Installers, and the average consumer. It helps explain simple tasks that you could only learn by digging through the User Manual or through experience of using the device.

1. Why does a DVR beep when I turn it on and how to make it stop?

The DVR has a built in speaker that emits a sound when there is an error or when it does a simple start-up. Every DVR emits a single beep when the unit does a complete start-up test and the single beep is the DVR’s way of sayings that is ready to go. There is no way of turning that sound off. Now when there is no Hard Drive or when the Hard Drive gives you an error of some sort, the DVR will start with the single beep and then also emit a short and long beep. If you want the sound to stop then you need to either press the power button 3 times or navigate trough the settings to release the alarm for the start up or turn the alarm off completely for future start-ups. To adjust it through the settings you need to go to Menu>Advanced>HDD Setting, and then hit Alarm Release; this will shut the alarm off until you restart. To shut the alarm off completely you need to go to Menu> Advanced>Abnormality, and choose to shut off alarm when there is no Hard Drive. In this menu you can also shut off other alarms.

2. How to change the IP address of a DVR/NVR and an IP Camera

Using Ethernet cables an IP Address (Internet Protocol) are how devices communicate over a network; All of our DVR/NVR’s and IP cameras work the same. Most of our IP cameras and DVR/NVR’s by default have an assigned static IP address but to use more than one device on the same network you need to adjust the IP address for each camera. To change the IP of a DVR (from the DVR) you have to go to the Main Menu>Settings, and Network. From here you can change the IP address of the Unit and specify what ports you want to use to remote in from outside the network. When choosing an IP address make sure you put the correct Subnet and Gateway. Also make sure the correct IP scheme is used for your network (192.168.1.x or 10.0.1.x). To adjust the IP of a camera you can use the Configuration tool that is provided in the CD that comes with the camera. Start the config tool and hit the refresh button to search for the camera (the default address is usually 192.168.1.108). Once found double click it and log in using the default password “admin”. You can quickly change the IP of the camera and continue to do it for every camera you add on. Just make sure you only plug one camera in at a time or you will get a IP conflict.

3. How to change the resolution of the Camera

There are many different cameras that we sell that work at different resolutions. Most of them you can adjust using your DVR but when it comes to IP, the camera does all of the work. To adjust the resolution of an analog camera you need to go to the DVR and navigate to Main Menu>Settings, and then encoding. In this menu you can not only change the resolution but also change the amount of frames, the bit rate, and change the extra stream. The reason for changing your resolution is because not all DVR’s can record at max resolution and a high frame rate. Most analog DVR’s tell you how many frames you can have per channel at max resolution. For example, out DVR-LT16480MHD can handle 16 cameras at 30 frames per second at D1 resolution and our DVR-EL16480ME can only handle 16 cameras at 7 frames per second at D1 resolution. With IP cameras the encoding is done in the camera and the NVR is just the storage. The NVR’s do have a max bandwidth they can receive so when connecting cameras to the NVR you have to do some calculations to figure out what resolution to set the camera to. You can set the resolution of the camera on though it’s own web service but for this article I will explain how to do it thought the NVR. Once you connect the camera to the NVR you can go to the Main Menu>Settings, and then Encode. From here you can adjust the resolution, frames per second, Bit Rate, and the Extra Stream for remote viewing. When calculating the resolution for all the cameras you connect to you NVR you also need to consider the Bit Rate. Doing so will help you apply more cameras to the NVR without taking to much from the picture.

This article was created to help people understand there DVR’s, NVR’s AND cameras better so you can do more with your system without having to search through the whole manual to find or call tech support and take more time out of your day. We sell our technology to help make your lives easier, not more confusing. This is the first of multiple FAQ articles that will help you understand the basics of your devices. If you have a more complex problem please call out tech support line for further explanation at 866-573-8878.

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How to connect an Onvif Camera on our Techpro Security NVR

Written By:
Monday, April 28th, 2014
2-megapixel-lx-series-ip-bullet

Configure and connect an Onvif Camera

As the evolution of Security IP devices grow tremendously over the past few years, a group of well know companies decided to create a protocol that will be used on a variety of applications to interconnect IP devices with Network Video recorders.

Additional companies have become members of this platform to facilitate the integration of their devices with other manufacturers.

Some Manufacturers have successfully integrated this platform so well that their devices perform close if not the same as there own brand.

Like any technology, Onvif have limitations when it comes to features. Some IP camera products will not be able to fully integrate all of the common features of a Megapixel Camera, such as being able to overlay camera name, the ability to change encoding features such as resolution or even frames per second. Some others will fully integrate, including the ability to detect motion.

Today I will be demonstrating our new line of Onvif Cameras and how to configure and integrate with our NVRs. For this demonstration I will be using an NVR-ELT-4 and an IPOB-LX2MPIR150L2812.

Preparing the camera

All of our LX Series IP cameras come with a default IP of 192.168.1.168, so we need to ensure we can access the camera first using a computer.

Connect your camera to a POE switch or connect a 12v DC power supply in the camera and make sure you have an Ethernet cable connected in your router or switch.

Download the following tool to find the camera on the network: http://www.securitycameraking.com/securityinfo/downloads/?wpdmdl=134&ind=0Open the Search Tool and click on Search. Remember to connect ONE camera at the time.

Search

Select the resultant IP address and assign a new IP address to the camera. Make sure you configure this with an IP address that is not being used in your network. To learn how to do this, follow these simple steps in this article: http://www.securitycameraking.com/securityinfo/how-to-configure-your-dvr-for-remote-access/

Preparing your PC to access the camera

 Before we connect to the camera, we need to allow a pluggin file to be installed in our computer. To do so you will need to go to Control Panel>Internet Options>Security>Customer Level and select the option “Prompt” under “Download unsigned ActiveX controls”. For this demonstration I will leave the default IP address of the camera intact and proceed to access the web interface.

Open up your browser and type the IP address of the camera, in my case is 192.168.1.168; the resultant web interface will be shown below:

pic1

Click on Download to install the pluggin. When done, refresh your page then install and allow the ActiveX file in your PC.

After the ActiveX has been installed successfully it is time to login to the camera and begin configuring some essential settings that will allow this camera to record based on motion. The default username and password is admin and the login page will be displayed as follows:

pic2

Go to Camera Settings to adjust resolution, bit rate and stream of each camera as shown in the figure below:

pic3

Next go to Alarm Settings to enable motion detection on the camera. Click on the checkbox next to “Enable Alarm” and “Motion Detection”and cane the alarm Duration to 10 Seconds. This option is to adjust how long is the camera detecting motion when a motion event occurs. Click OK when Done.

pic5

Click on Motion Detect Option and click on “Select All”. Next change the sensitivity to “HIGH, MEDIUM or LOW” depending of how sensitive you want the camera to be. When done click the OK button. Note: motion recording needs to be tweaked in order to find the optimal detection trigger. One of the common options to change is sensitivity and region.

pic6

Our next and last step will be to connect the camera to the NVR. As you might know all of our DVRs and NVRs have a default IP address of 192.168.1.108. Assuming your network falls in that range the next steps is been able to access the unit from your PC.

Make sure your NVR is connected to the network with an Ethernet cable, and connected to your router.

Open Internet Explorer and begin typing the default IP address of the NVR, in this case the default IP is 192.168.1.108. You will be prompt to install ActiveX Files for the NVR as well.

After you have installed all of the necessary plugins then logging to the NVR and click “Set”. The screen shot will show you a sample of the buttons to press:

Device Search SelectDevice Search Select

Next, Click Add to connect the camera to the NVR.  After the camera has been added, wait a few seconds for the camera to successfully establish the connections stream. You can now click on “Preview” and click on the channel where the camera is connected.

Video

The last step is to configure your NVR Schedule to record base on motion. To do so go to Set>Storage>Schedule. Click on Set and select Motion under Period 1 and select all to record motion every day of the week. Click on Save, Copy and select All to copy all of these settings to all of the channels.

Schedule

Remember to save all of the settings when you finish. If you have follow all of these steps  you have successfully configured your LX IP Series Camera to record based on motion. Below is a quick video demonstrating how to setup and connect the camera to the NVR:

embedded by Embedded Video

YouTube Direkt
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