Posts Tagged ‘ pan-tilt-zoom camera’



Network PTZ Dome Surveillance Camera

Written By:
Monday, April 25th, 2011

If you are looking for an Internet based camera you should consider one of Security Camera King’s Network PTZ Dome Surveillance Cameras.  These cameras are very versatile with lots of additional features than just Pan-Tilt-Zoom.  In the following article, we’ll take a look at how these cameras work and give an overview on each of these types of cameras that Security Camera King has to offer.

First let’s talk a bit about the camera.  There are IP or Internet Protocol ready dome cameras that may or may not have the ability to pan, tilt, and zoom.  Like wise there are dome cameras that are not IP ready that do have the ability to pan, tilt, zoom.  The dome cameras we discuss in this article are IP ready AND have the ability to pan, tilt, and zoom.  Often times they may be referred to as Network PTZ Dome Surveillance Cameras.

IP cameras are regular digital video cameras with extra electronic circuitry built inside.  The extra circuitry is what is needed to support the camera on the Internet; in other words these cameras do not directly plug into a Digital Video Recorder or DVR.  What they do connect to is a broadband internet connection, usually through CAT5 Ethernet cable.

The camera contains its own Web server technology and once a few pieces of information are provided to the camera’s setup program, the camera begins streaming video via the Internet to either a Network server or to your PC.  You may see an overwhelming amount of 3 and 4 letter initials mentioned under network protocol.  Don’t let these bother you, this is merely a list of the different network protocols that the camera is compatible with.

One acronym that we should mention is PoE.  If the camera is PoE capable (and most, but not all IP cameras usually are) that means the camera can obtain the power it needs to operate with the Ethernet connection, hence the term PoE stands for “Power Over Ethernet.”  This means it is not necessary for you to install a power cable for your camera.

While PTZ camera don’t have to be Internet ready cameras, many IP ready cameras do have “Digital PTZ.”  PTZ or Pan-Tilt- Zoom are movement terms somewhat unique to the photograph and film industry.  Pan means the camera can move horizontally.  Tilt means the camera can move up and down.  Zoom is a function that narrows the FOV and enlarges the appearance of individual objects.

Security Camera King offers four different network PTZ dome surveillance cameras.  The following list those cameras and provides a short summary of their features.

Product# VDIP-D1L312 Indoor IP Network Dome Camera

  • Dual CODEC (H.264 and MJPEG)
  • Digital PTZ
  • Poe
  • Two-way audio communication
  • 3G mobile A/V surveillance
  • Multi profile streaming
  • 520TVL resolution

 

Product# VVIP-D1L312 Vandal Resistant IP Network Dome Camera

This camera is basically the same camera as above with the exception that this is constructed in a special way as to make it vandal resistant.

  • Dual CODEC (H.264 and MJPEG)
  • Digital PTZ
  • Poe
  • Two-way audio communication
  • 3G mobile A/V surveillance
  • Multi profile streaming
  • 520TVL resolution

 

Product# VDIP-2L316 2 Megapixel Infrared IP Network Dome Camera

This camera is basically the same as the first camera listed above with one exception.  This camera is capable of producing images at a full resolution of 1,600 x 1,200 pixels, also known as UXGA.

  • Dual CODEC (H.264 and MJPEG)
  • Digital PTZ
  • Poe
  • Two-way audio communication
  • 3G mobile A/V surveillance
  • Multi profile streaming
  • 2 Megapixel resolution

 

Product# VVIP-2L316  2 Megapixel Infrared Vandal Resistant IP Network Dome Camera

This camera is basically the same as the one above that is listed just before this entry (Product# VDIP-2L316) with the major difference being that this camera is constructed in a special design to make it vandal resistant.

  • Dual CODEC (H.264 and MJPEG)
  • Digital PTZ
  • Poe
  • Two-way audio communication
  • 3G mobile A/V surveillance
  • Multi profile streaming
  • 2 megapixel resolution

If you have any additional questions about a Network PTZ Dome Surveillance Camera that have not been answered by this article or the Web pages that these cameras are on, contact one of our security specialists today.   There are two ways to contact them, on-line Live Chat or by telephone at 866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6PM EST.

 

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PTZ-TOOL Programming Module

Written By:
Thursday, April 14th, 2011

The PTZ-TOOL programming module makes programming PTZ cameras a cinch.  Security Camera King offers this for sale for customers because there are many people that have more than 1 PTZ (Pan-Tilt-Zoom) camera in their system.  In fact, this tool is only required if you use more than 1 PTZ camera in your system, but it can be used to control a standalone PTZ camera as well.

PTZ cameras make for a powerful addition to a digital video security system.  Often times, these cameras can take the place of two or more stationary cameras making them very cost effective as well.  These cameras usually come with factory pre-settings and it may be useful to “tweak” them a bit; that’s where the PTZ-TOOL programming module comes in.

Before we talk about the PTZ-TOOL programming module itself, let’s take a look at what makes up a digital video system and exactly what a PTZ camera can do in that system.

A basic digital video security and surveillance system normally consists of three components; one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and one or more monitors (a monitor is needed for the initial setup of the system, but once the system is up and running a monitor is actually an optional choice).

The cameras’ primary function is to “capture” video images created by light that reflects off objects in the cameras’ field of view.  The lens focuses this light onto a small sensor that ranges in size from 1/4″ up to about 1/2″ square.  When light strikes its individual units (pixels for example) the sensor produces an electrical impulse that can be measured.  These electrical impulses are used to create a video image that can be displayed on an electronic monitor and/or compiled into a file that can be stored on the DVR’s hard disk drive.

There are many different ways to increase or decrease the field of view for the camera.  One way is to use a varifocal lens.  These lenses however are often only manually operated and can only enlarge or reduce the field of view.  Another way to increase security coverage is to use more than one camera in such a manner that their fields of view overlap just a little.

The third way to increase coverage is to use a PTZ camera. A PTZ camera can normally pan 360 degrees or a full circle and have a vertical movement of at least 180 degrees.  In other words, picture an object that looks like a sphere cut in-half.  Now imagine the camera lens in that half-sphere; generally this is the area that the camera lens can move/rotate through in order to capture video images.

PTZ cameras have become very popular, due to their extreme versatility and advanced electronically controlled features.  However, there are so many different features and functions that it may seem somewhat overwhelming to the do-it-yourselfer.  The PTZ-TOOL Programming Module helps to make the task of changing PTZ settings easy.

 

The PTZ-TOOL Programming Module is designed for use with Security Camera King’s PTZ-LX550L3X Pan/Tilt/Zoom Camera and our PT-LX540 Pan/Tilt Camera.  If you use more than one PTZ-LX550L3X or PT-LX540 Pan/Tilt Camera you will need the PTZ-TOOL programming module.  One of the reasons that this tool is required when using more than one PTZ or PT camera is so the address of the camera can be changed from the setting of “1.”

The DVR has virtual “ports” that are assigned to the cameras to keep them separate for the DVR’s sake.  These virtual ports or addresses can range from 0-255.  Programming the camera to a different address allows the DVR or other device to control that camera only.  It’s the equivalent of a first name when talking about someone in a particular family.  If you used the surname only, no one would know who you were talking to; mother, father or siblings.  However, when you use a first name, then the individual knows exactly who you are talking to (addressing).

With the Programming Module for PTZ-LX550L3X and PT-LX540, you can assign different addresses (first names) to the cameras so that the DVR can keep track of them.

If you have any additional questions about the Programming Module for PTZ-LX550L3X and PT-LX540 contact one of our security experts today either by on-line “Live Chat” or by telephone at 1-866-573-8878  Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6PM EST.

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Motion Activated Security Camera

Written By:
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

There are many purposes for using a motion activated security camera.  Portably, the most popular reason for using the motion activated security camera is to conserve electronic resources.  On the other hand, these cameras may be used for an entirely different reason; to provide alerts like an alarm system when something is there.

There are also several different types of motion activated security cameras.  In this article, we’ll explore how these cameras work, describe some of the more popular types, and talk about what how they may be used.

Many of today’s digital video camera security systems use wireless cameras.  This option provides great versatility in camera mounting types and locations.  A wireless camera does not require the usual RG-59 or similar type of cable to be run directly from the camera to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR and or monitor.

Instead, the camera has a built in radio transmitter and an on-board antenna.  It converts its video data into a radio signal and transmits it via the transmitter/antenna combination to a corresponding receiver or a DVR that contains a built in receiver.  As noted above, this can provide great freedom in cameral location and mounting choices.

However, the camera still needs a power supply.  So a power supply wire needs to be run from either a nearby outlet plug (if there is one) or from a power distribution box.  Since the wireless camera has gained great strides in achieving freedom from the wireless transmission, the power supply wire could possibly continue to restrict that freedom.  So, enter the new battery operated wireless, digital video security camera.

However, these cameras can place a hefty drain on batteries requiring frequent replacement or recharging.  So what is the solution to unnecessary battery drain?  A motion activated security camera.  These cameras contain an on-board motion detector that turns the camera on when it detects motion.  Since the motion detector itself consumes a fraction of the total power that a recording camera does, battery power is greatly conserved and battery life or recharging periods are greatly lengthened.

This same sort of principle is also used on hidden, disguised, or covert cameras.   Due to the nature of these cameras, they are often subjected to running on battery power.  Once again, a 12 hour recording of an empty room can not only be wasteful, but use tremendous amounts of battery life.  Make the device with a built in motion detector and the camera is now a motion activated security camera.

The types of cameras we’ve mentioned so far work by using a Passive InfraRed (PIR) motion detector.  The PIR has the ability to sample the average heat signature in the field of view of which it is aimed (usually the same field of view as the camera).  When an object with a different temperature than the surroundings, such as a body, a vehicle, etc. passes in front of the PIR it can detect this sudden change in the heat signature of the field of view.

The PIR interprets the heat signature change as an object in motion.  The PIR is connected to an electronic relay such that when motion is detected, the PIR tell the relay to turn the switch on to the camera and start recording.  The camera either stops when the PIR no longer detects motion or at a designated time period when after motion ceases.

There is another type of motion activated security camera that doesn’t work on the basis of Passive InfraRed activity.  This camera is usually left in an “on” state where it is constantly capturing the visual image in its field of view.  Instead of using a PIR, programming analyzes the video image that is being captured to determine if there is a change in any of the basic patters of the current field of view.

When a change is detected, the camera is activated such that although it is already on and capturing video images the camera now initiates processing and recording.  In other words on this type of system, the camera is on an capturing but not necessarily transmitting its video data to a monitor or DVR.  However, when the on-board programming detects a change in the otherwise motionless scenery, the camera initiates full recording and transmitting of its video signals.

This particular type of motion activated security camera is often used as a Pan-Tilt-Zoom camera that can track and follow objects based on the motion that it detects.

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PTZ Security Cameras

Written By:
Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ security cameras can really extend the field of view of an otherwise stationary camera.  There are a variety of PTZ security cameras that can perform many functions in addition to PTZ perhaps making this camera the most versatile in application of all the different types of security cameras.   Security Camera King has a large selection of only the highest quality PTZ security cameras in the business.

A horizontal movement of a camera’s field of view (or direction of aim) is called a “Pan.”  Likewise, vertical movement of a camera’s field of view is called “Tilt.”  Using combinations of telephoto lens moving in and out to enlarge or shrink the field of view or magnify specific objects within the field of view is called “Zooming.”  A PTZ camera of course, can do all three of these actions.

Several years ago, a PTZ security camera was incredibly expensive; especially if it was the older analog type camera.  These cameras were often bullet or box type cameras that were mounted on electric motor operated pedestals to produce the movements necessary to pan or tilt.  They were often awkward, bulky, and bumpy in their movement.

Today’s modern digital video PTZ cameras are very light weight and move with incredible precision and fluidity.  They are much cheaper than their analog ancestors thanks to modern technological improvements in both electronic circuitry and mechanical design.  The majority of PTZ cameras on the market today are the dome type camera.  They can be mounted on the ceiling or on the wall using horizontal mounting brackets.

Regardless of whether the camera is mounted on the ceiling or the wall, the camera itself is oriented in a position that always puts the camera dome opposite the floor or ground.  In this position, the camera has the advantage of being able to pan around in a circle of 360 degrees and tilt in a full semi-sphere of 180 degrees or more.  If possible a ceiling mount or side mount on a pole is more desirable than a wall mount because providing there are no additional objects blocking the view of the camera, it has a greater total viewing area (not being blocked by a wall).

PTZ security cameras are controlled by any a variety of different methods.  They can be controlled using a PTZ controller board which has a joystick and push buttons or they can often be controlled by keyboard buttons alone. Each of Security Camera King’s featured DVR’s the Elite-Mini, Elite, and Ultimate series also offer’s a unique mouse PTZ control.  The camera movements can be controlled by clicking the camera’s view on the monitor screen and pointing and dragging the mouse.  The PTZ camera will follow the mouse’s movement.

In addition, PTZ security cameras can also be purchased with optional auto-tracking features.  Auto-tracking is a special function that enables the camera to detect motion, follow the object, and zoom in on the object automatically to provide the most advantageous view.  This feature is often used by security departments responsible for large retail parking lots or industrial employee parking lots to maintain security coverage in these areas.  When cars or individuals enter or move around the parking lot the camera can keep track of them every inch of the way.

Another common feature of PTZ security cameras is area specific preset patrol.  In this mode the camera is preset to patrol a specified area.  It can be set to track and follow in that specified area or when triggered can be set to pan, tilt, and/or zoom to a pre-determined specified area.

When choosing your PTZ security camera, make sure you purchase the appropriate type for the environment; cameras are either rated for use indoors or outdoors or both.  Next you’ll need to determine if you need the optional auto-tracking feature.

You will also need to determine the magnitude of the zoom function that you desire.  Generally, the greater the magnification of the zoom function, the more expensive the camera due to the precision lenses and electronic circuitry that are required to support it.  Lastly, you will need to determine what type of mount you’ll need for the camera.

Checkout Security Camera King’s full line of PTZ security cameras by clicking on  “Pan Tilt Security Cameras“.

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PTZ Web Cameras

Written By:
Monday, February 14th, 2011

Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ Web cameras bring two powerful punches to the benefit of the digital video security and surveillance world. Not only can these cameras allow your system to reap the powerful benefit of camera movement (the first punch) but also make use of the Internet as a means for networking (punch number two).

PTZ cameras have been used in the video security and surveillance world for quite some time; even when the systems operated in a totally analog format. However, as technology has increased, cameras have become more powerful in function and lighter in weight as well as more versatile in application. Now, digital video cameras with PTZ functions are much more easily controlled.

Older analog systems usually required a separate, big, bulky controller board that connected to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR unit to manipulate PTZ cameras. This board was proprietary in that it was the only device that could be used to pan, tilt, or zoom PTZ cameras. However, since video security cameras have left the analog genre and become digital, there has been some merging that has occurred with the personal computer world.

There are still separate controller boards available for use with digital PTZ cameras, but these cameras can also be controlled by using software and a personal computer. Many systems are now based on personal computer Graphical User Interfaces or GUIs and the PTZ functions can be controlled by a computer mouse or keyboard strokes.

One PTZ web camera can literally take the place of several non-PTZ cameras. Since these cameras can move in two dimensions and enlarge views as well, they can cover the field of vision that would normally take several non-PTZ cameras to cover. PTZ web cameras have many uses and are great for monitoring large areas such as parking lots, industrial property, and even highways.

Having one or more PTZ cameras is certainly a powerful advantage, but if these cameras are also PTZ Web cameras, their versatility in application and ease of access is incredibly increased. A PTZ Web camera utilizes the Internet as the networking solution for the system thereby broadening the scope of access globally.

PTZ Web cameras are also known as IP ready or Internet Protocol ready cameras. These cameras have built in web server technology so that the camera can connect directly to the Internet. Once the Internet connection has been established these cameras can be used in many ways.

For example, more than one PTZ Web cameras can be networked together using the Internet to carry their signals to a remotely located Digital Video Recorder or DVR unit that can record their digital video data. Another way PTZ Web cameras can be used is as individual cameras that use the Internet to send their digital video data to personal computers which are used to monitor and record their digital video data. This has great implications.

PTZ Web cameras that are connected to the Internet can be accessed anywhere in the world there is broadband Internet access. This instantly converts the accessibility of the camera from a local system to a globally accessible system. In addition to monitoring these cameras anywhere there is Internet access, these cameras can also be controlled remotely from the same point.

This access is not limited to only a personal computer with an Internet browser, but 3G and 4G smartphones can also monitor and control these cameras. This means you could be sunning on the beach in Australia while panning, tilting, zooming and monitoring your PTZ web camera security system in Paris. What more is the only thing needed to use your smartphone to do this is the small software application or app; and Security Camera King makes smartphone apps available for their featured security systems for free.

In addition, PTZ Web cameras can also be programmed to track or follow moving objects. This auto-tracking option is great for keeping a close eye on moving objects in the cameras field of vision, especially if the field of vision is not expected to contain moving objects.

So if you have the need for a digital video security cameras that can “look” left and right, up and down, and enlarge the view of objects, consider purchasing PTZ cameras. However, if you would like a camera that does all this and can be viewed and controlled anywhere in the world there is broadband Internet access, consider purchasing PTZ Web Cameras.

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