Posts Tagged ‘ pan tilt zoom’



Where Should I Place My Security Cameras In My Business?

Written By:
Monday, September 8th, 2014

2 Megapixel Bullet Camera

Where Should I Place My Security Cameras In My Business? It would seem a rather simple question. Exactly what did you want to see? However yet, there are some elements to consider when designing your camera plan that you may not have considered. I have listed some of the things you might want to cover in a section by section breakdown that you can peruse on a “by application” basis.

Exterior Building Parking Lots: Clearly one of the most popular placements for cameras, parking lots can also be difficult to secure. They are often large areas where targets are undetermined to enter, exit, or travel. Additionally, you are often working with a number of unknowns and variables. This enormous unknown factor means you have to be prepared for something to occur anywhere within this large area. The use of pan tilt zoom, multiple varifocal, and megapixel cameras are common, and combining them is an even more effective way to cover your lots.

Exterior Building Yards: Yard areas are often where a company keeps some of their most expensive assets. Machinery, inventory, and other large and bulk items are kept in these yards. This can be a perplexing situation for security. Ideally cameras focused on specific areas, megapixel cameras, or auto-tracking cameras are excellent options, and of course, combinations of these are even better.

Exterior Building Perimeter: Covering the exterior entrances of a building can be tricky, and if possible shouldn’t be combined with cameras being used to cover yards or lots. The wider the angle of picture used to capture an area, the smaller the objects in that picture appear (and therefore yielding less detail). Therefore, for the sake of detail, you should use separate cameras for these purposes. Obtaining the largest, clearest pictures of persons entering and leaving a building or area is absolutely critical in many situations.

Exterior Building Zone Management and Security: No access and sensitive areas can be managed easily and cost-effective with the right cameras and recorder. Many recorders can be set to send you a text, email, or push notification if there is motion within a certain area of a camera’s field of view. Additionally, Pan Tilt Zoom cameras can be trained to change direction and zoom in and out if there is a motion activation in a certain area.

Exterior Building Vehicle Registration: Capturing vehicle information can be accomplished very easily. The key to this task is more a matter of camera proximity than type. Capturing vehicle information can be very useful to authorities in the event that something occurs on your property.

Interior Building Security: When considering interior camera locations, there are many considerations. Certainly you will want overviews of any area of interest, but there is more than just that to consider. You will want to cover your major entry points. In the case of your home, doing this with a covert camera may give you critical information identifying potential intruders unaware of the camera’s existence. In your business, a super high quality varifocal camera will give you a record of all who enter. You will also want to cover high importance areas with their own camera. Cash registers and counting areas, gun and cash safes, jewelry boxes, and theater rooms can all be perfect situations to place an additional covert or high end camera.

Interior Building Inventory Control: Clearly one of the most important purposes for cameras is to protect the valuables contained within a building. Placing cameras at high traffic areas creates a registry of people entering and leaving the area with inventory. Additional cameras placed in areas of particularly valuable or important items is always suggested as an additional way to account for those items. Another philosophy is to place a camera at the exits to monitor persons as they exit the building.

Interior Building Time Theft Prevention: Keeping watch of your time clock can be far more important than you realize. Its becoming more and more common to find that another employee has been punching the time clock on the behalf of their friend, or employees punching themselves back in from break and then returning to the break room. These are just a few forms of a new crime known as “time theft”. Essentially, its fraud. You could easily lose thousands of dollars at your time clock.

Interior Building Supervisory: Large area overview cameras are gaining popularity these days as well. These cameras assist the business owner in keeping tabs on their employees and the activities they are performing. They can be used to enforce and ensure safety policies are being adhered to, observing and training employees on the job, observing customers/clients for research on behaviors, and enforcement of rules, regulations and standards of your business. Lastly, interior cameras give you piece of mind by giving you the power to simply look and see what exactly is going on while you are away yourself.

Interior Building Monetary Assets Control: In any business there are precious investments that need to be secured. Everything from expensive machines or computers, to safes and registers, to raw inventory, to the very people in the business (customers and employees alike) has/have potential to be stolen or damaged. Keeping an eye on valuable assets is an obvious use for cameras.

Interior Building Entrant Registration: Even though this is the last entry in my camera locations blog, it may actually be the most important. A registry of entries and exits and a detail of the people of the persons coming and going could prove critical in the cases of many events. Placing a camera at each entrance that only views literally the space required to enter or exit the building, and raised to the optimal zone the people’s heads travel through should give you a nice big detailed picture of their face. When paired with an overview camera of the area, you can now track that person based on a) their apparel and look and b) simply going from camera to camera and tracing their movements. If that person is caught on recording stealing, vandalizing, or any other action of interest; you can now simply reverse through the footage until you get to the point where they had entered the building. At that point, you have that nice large image of their face. If there are other confined entry points (like other doorways) that allow access into areas of interest or importance or value, you could place other facial capture cameras as a way to make certain the person is the same, and to get more details about them.

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Understanding PTZ cameras

Written By:
Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Since there are a lot of Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Cameras available, I will explain in this article on how to best choose the correct PTZ for your Security Camera Installation.

I will start by showing the different parts of a PTZ camera.

1. Parts of a PTZ camera

(a) Housing – Usually composed of an aluminum bell shaped cover (image 1) or some models have abs plastic housings (images 2,3)

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

aluminium ptz housing plasticdome,jpg plasticdome2,jpg

(b) Camera module
This is where the image CCD sensor, optical lens, and the motors that control Zoom and Focus are located.

Camera Module

(c) PTZ control board
The PTZ control board processes RS485 data  that converts it into mechanical movements.
PTZ Control Board

Note: On this particular PTZ control board it has dip switches (the red block with white switches). This allows you to change the protocol and ID of the camera. Some of our cameras are configured via the OSD (On Screen Display) menu.

(d) PTZ motors – are the small motors that allow the camera to perform up, down, left and right functions. Marked by the arrows are two step motors; the one to the top controls up and down movements and the one at the bottom controls left and right movements (Image 1).

Note: The motors used on a PTZ camera are known as step motors which use steps (teeth) that allow a more precise movement vs. standard electromagnetic motors that require higher RPM’S and torque. Below are the two animated examples of an electromagnetic motor (image 2) and step motor (image 3).

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

camera motors2 electric motor animation 1 StepperMotor1

(e) PTZ Pigtail – is the cable that comes out of the camera which allows you to connect power, video, network, audio and alarms.

The Standard size IPPTZ cameras have alarm, audio, analog BNC out and an RJ45 jack (image 1). Mini-IPPTZ do not have an analog out option.

Our analog PTZ cameras have rs485, ground, BNC analog out and DC power plug (image 2)

Image 1

Image 2

ipptz-connection ptz-analog

Note: RS485 is a simple protocol used for communication between two or more devices. The nature of RS-485 allows transmission of  PTZ data along side power or in electrically noisy environment with out interference. It has been tested to work at 1600 ft. on CAT6e cable.

2. Technologies

Currently our PTZ’s  come in three different technologies

1. Analog

2. IP

3. HD-CVI

(a) Camera cable run limitations and options to extend if necessary

Analog has a 1000 ft. Video and RS485 Range but can only be powered up to 150 ft. before voltage drop. Two ways you can counter the power limitation is by:

1. having power at the camera
2. Using a power supply with a higher amperage rating. An example of that would be if your camera is rated at 500 ma and your run is over 150 ft – use a 2-5 amp power supply. Although theoretically it should work we do not recommend exceeding the 150 ft. limit

IP has a 300 ft. limit due to standard networking limitation. Since power, video and RS485 can be run on a single CAT6e cable there is no way to increase the range without additional equipment. In the event you have to exceed the 300 ft limit you can use a POE injector that allows you to extend an additional 300 ft.

HD-CVI has 1600 ft. video and RS485 limit.  You can use CAT6e for both the RS485 and Video; for the video you will need video baluns to allow 1600 ft. range. The power has the same limitation as the analog cameras and will required local power or a higher rated 12v 2-5 amps depending on the camera requirements.

(b) Video quality and Resolutions

Analog – Our analog  cameras come with 700 TVL

IP – Range from  1.3 Mega Pixel, 2 Mega Pixel, and 3 Mega Pixel

HD-CVI – Currently only supports 1 Mega Pixel (720P)

(c) What are  differences between IP, analog + HD-CVI

1. An analog camera has to be physically connected into the DVR to record video and has a limitation of 1000ft.

An IP camera does not have to connect directly to an NVR, simply by configuring some the network you can access your camera anywhere in the world. Let say your camera is in California and your NVR ( Network Video Recorder) is in New York; you can actually record the video from that camera at your New York location. This type of setup is used frequently by government and cities to monitor remote cameras.

2. Both the IP and HD-CVI support HD resolution, 720P and 1080P, where as the analog only supports D1 resolution at 700 TVL

Note: The higher the resolution of a camera the larger the images. It allows for wider coverage areas and more details vs the analog resolution. Because the images are larger on higher resolutions its better suited to use the digital zoom to get a closer look at an object.

3. Mini and Standard size cameras

Two of the mayor differences between our mini and standard size PTZ cameras is the size of the housing and the optical lens capacities. The mini cameras are more aesthetically appealing in smaller homes and offices. The larger housings are better suited for larger homes and commercial applications.

Mini-PTZ

Standard Size PTZ

4. Camera modules

(a) The camera module houses what is called the CCD or CMOS board (image 1), lens and motors that allow fine adjustments of zoom + focus (image 2).

Image 1 – CCD OR CMOS board

Image 2 – PTZ lens with control motors

ccdboard ptz lens

(b) Image Sensor – captures light and converts it into a digital image that can be stored onto the DVR/NVR. Currently there are two different types of sensors, CCD and CMOS. There isn’t much difference as far as image quality but the CMOS sensors are known to handle brighter than normal scenarios extremely well. The CCD sensors were designed for IR applications where cut filters and automatic shutters are used. But in the past few years with advancement in technology, cameras now offer WDR or ( Wide Dynamic Range) and IR cut filters (Infrared Cut filters) which allows digital and mechanical adjustment for your specific setup. So it doesn’t matter if your using a CMOS or CCD your end results are of high quality.

CCD Sensor

CMOS Sensor

CCD cmos

(c) Optical lens – Allows for adjustment of zoom or focus. When you zoom in the lens moves closer to the image senor so the image becomes larger. When you zoom out the lens moves away from the image sensor which make the image small and results in a wider view.  When referring to 12x zoom on lets say our PTZ-LX700L12X mini it means it can zoom in 12 times the normal amount. Generally you can find out what the range on the lens is by multiplying the lens size by the times zoom. So in our PTZ-LX-700L12X you can multiply 5×12=60. Five being the lens size multiplied by zoom gives you maximum mm size of 60 mm. In this case this camera has a vari focal range of 5-60mm

Here is an example of our 23x PTZ camera, the approximate distance from the camera to the truck is 380ft.

6. Mounting options

PTZ cameras are designed to rotate a full 360 degree there for an arm (image 2), pendulum mount (image 3)or ceiling mount bracket (image 1) is used for mounting the cameras.

Ceiling mounts- A ceiling mounting is great for any application that requires a PTZ camera but with a low profile. The better half of the camera goes into any surface and has a clip mechanism to secure it. Only the dome will be visible for a aesthetically appealing look.

Arm mount- Are designed to mount a vertical plane or post. Generally this camera serves as a deterrence as it protrudes from where its mounted

Pendant mount- are designed to hang  from a horizontal surface such as ceiling, post.

 In ceiling mount   Arm mount  Pendant mount
plasticdome2,jpg 700tvl-12x-indoor-outdoor-pan-tilt-zoom-security-camera-59056big pr59195img4sma

7. Wiring PTZ cameras 

(a) Wiring RS485 for Analog PTZ cameras

There are two ways you can successfully wire PTZ cameras 1. Daisy chain  2. Star or direct connection

 Daisy Chain connection

  Star or Direct connection

multiple ptz connection daisy chain multiple ptz connection

Note: Recommended cable CAT6e but CAT5e works fine as well, Use a single pair ex: solid blue and white/ blue, use the solid blue as the positive and the white/blue as the negative.

The main difference between daisy chaining or direct connection is on a daisy chain the cameras rely on each other. So if one fails the ones that follow the failed camera will not work. On a direct connection the cable is ran directly from each camera to the controller or DVR; I normally splice in a 2-3 ft. cable to make it easier to connect. IF a camera fails none of the other cameras are affected and continue to operate as normal.

If you would like to learn more about our PTZ cameras check them out here.

**step motor and regular motor images borrowed from http://www.wikipedia.org/

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The Pros and cons of a PTZ Security Camera

Written By:
Friday, April 18th, 2014

When you are choosing a security camera for your home or business it helps to understand the different lens options that are available to you. Most common are the fixed lens, varifocal lens and the PTZ’s, otherwise known as the Pan, Tilt, Zoom cameras.

ptz-or-not

A fixed lens is just that, a non-adjustable lens. Typically they are a 3.6mm lens that gives a wide overview similar to what the human eye can see.

Then you have the Varifocal lens. Put simply this is a lens that can be manually zoomed and focused on a specific area. It’s important to realize that a varifocal camera is zoomed and focused at the time the camera is being setup.

Once you have positioned and zoomed your fixed lens or varifocal camera, that is the view that you will see from that point on when viewing the cameras or watching recorded video.

If you wanted to see a different view you would need to get up on your ladder and re-adjust the view, zoom or focus manually.

The PTZ
What you probably want is a fancy camera like you see in the movies. One with a cool joystick that will allow you to move the camera around and zoom in and out in real-time. That’s a PTZ or Pan, Tilt, Zoom camera.

TPK-65-Front-1024

Many PTZs can zoom in up to 36 times with optical zoom and can also digitally zoom after that. They also have the ability to be set on a tour or a pattern. That means you can set the camera on a predefined repeating cycle. You might want to have it look in one direction for 5 seconds than turn 60 degrees, zoom in and look in another direction for 10 seconds. The pattern options are fully customizable.

Some PTZ security cameras even have special features like Motion Tracking. This is where the camera will automatically detect movement, lock on to an object and track it.

So you might be asking yourself, why I would you ever not want a PTZ. It seems like they do it all. Well before you go out and buy all PTZ cameras here are a few things to think about.

Cost
The first thing you need to know is that PTZ’s are typically a lot more expensive than fixed or varifocal cameras. If you want to add IR (Night Vision) the cost jumps up even more.
A high quality varifocal with 100ft of IR like the (VD-EF700IR100L2812D-W) will run you around $159. Compare that to a good 36x PTZ with IR like the (PTZ-EL700IR300L36X) and you will spend about $1990.

Although it is possible to get a very nice 12x PTZ with no IR starting as low as $229. I highly recommend it the (PTZ-LX700L12X-E) from SecurityCameraKing.com

Installation
When you install a PTZ a couple of things need to be taken into consideration. First, most PTZs are larger than a typical security camera and require more power. It is usually recommended that PTZs have their own dedicated power source. Many come with a power supply but in some cases you may have to buy a separate one.

Most PTZs today are controlled via RS485. RS485 is a standard on most new DVRs but an extra set of wires may need to be run to control the Pan, Tilt and Zoom of the camera.
If you are installing an IP PTZ the power, video and control can all be done over a single CAT5 cable but a separate POE Power injector is recommended.

Control
In order to control your PTZ you will have to use the on-screen buttons or UI of your DVR, PSS Software, Web Interface or mobile App assuming they have that ability. If you want to use a Joystick you will probably have to purchase one separately.

Functionality
Here’s a scenario. Let’s say you are going to install an 8 camera system. You decide to buy 7 varifocal cameras and 1 PTZ.
Sounds like a good plan so far, right.

Now let’s say your system has been up and running for a while and you realize someone ran over your garden gnome.

gnome

So you go back and start looking at the recordings and realize the only camera that could have caught this is the PTZ.

You find the segment of the recording you’re looking for and wouldn’t you know it, just when the gnome was run over the PTZ was looking in the other direction! Trust me this happens a lot.

You might decide after this happens a few times to take the PTZ out of tour mode, but then you just have a very expensive fixed lens camera. Of course you do still have the ability to Pan, Tilt and Zoom via your DRV or a Joystick.

One other thing I have noticed. If you do decide to set your PTZ to a fixed view and the power goes out or the camera reboots there is no guarantee the lens will automatically go back the desired position. You may have to go back and point it there again.

Remember earlier when I spoke about Auto Tracking? There are a couple of things to keep in mind.
1. All PTZs do not have Auto Tracking Abilities.

2. Typically the camera will track the largest object in its view. If a car pulls up and 3 guys get out and run in different directions the camera will most likely follow the biggest guy.

3. If you want to use Auto Tracking then your PTZ can’t be in Tour Mode. The PTZ will not be able to detect motion and track an object if it is constantly moving because it’s in tour mode.

Conclusion
Although PTZ’s might seem like a great idea there are several things to consider before going out and spending a lot of time and money on something that is not necessarily going to be the best solution for you particular situation.

That being said I personally have a PTZ and couldn’t live without it. They definably have their place and are always a great addition to your security system but may not be the best choice as you only line of defense.

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Security Camera Software

Written By:
Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Security Camera SoftwareSecurity camera software can be though of as the glue that binds together digital video cameras and Personal Computers (PCs) or Macintosh Computers (Macs) as well as Digital Video Recorder (DVR) units for standalone systems.  It’s also the heart of remote DVR monitoring applications (Apps) that allows your smartphone to access your video security system.  In essence, it provides the programming that allows you to control the camera, monitor the camera, record the digital video files, and maintain and control the DVR.

 

There are many types of security camera software.  Perhaps the simplest to use is a typical web browser such as Internet Explorer, Firefox Mozilla, Google Chrome and others.  For digital video security cameras and DVRs that are IP (Internet Protocol) ready, a web browser may be all that is needed to control, monitor, and record digital video security images.  However, these cameras may also be networked and use a Network Video Recorder or NVR.  If that’s the case, then the software used for the NVR must be considered also.

 

Although it may be difficult to describe what security camera software is we can easily describe what it isn’t.  Security Camera Software is not firmware.  Firmware is basically the drivers and internal commands that a device needs to communicate with processors and other devices.  Firmware is device and manufacturer specific and is usually only updated on a seldom basis.

 

Security camera software is not Operating System (OS) software.  Operating systems like Windows, Linux, Mac, and others provide the basis for central communication between devices, processors, and users.  OS software is what makes a computer system work.  Normally, DVRs and NVRs have OS software like Linux and WIndows 7.

 

So where does that leave us with security camera software?  As stated earlier it could be considered as a web browser, but typically security camera software is specific programming that is designed to operate a digital video security system.  We can list the types of security camera software based on how they are designed to work.  Security camera software can be:

 

  • -Designed to provide the control, monitoring and recording of security cameras and DVRs;
  • -Designed to allow PCs and Macs to provide the control, monitoring, and recording of security cameras when used in conjunction with a security video PCI card;
  • -Designed to provide the control, monitoring and recording of security cameras and DVRs that may be networked using the Internet (IP ready);
  • -As mentioned earlier, designed as Apps for Smartphones to allow them to monitor and control IP ready cameras; and
  • -Designed to integrate a variety of digital video capture devices such as webcams, netcams (or IP ready cams), computer PCI capture cards and computers to create a digital video security system.

 

The first type on our list is software that is normally provided when you purchase a standalone digital video security system with a DVR.  The manufacturer of the DVR or the Cameras (or both) may provide the software that is normally installed on the DVR unit.  This software is used to control camera functions such as Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) functions and timers that turn the cameras on and off.

 

The second type of security camera software on our list works with computers that use a PCI card.  There are some digital video security systems that are specifically designed to work with your computer.  For example Geovision brand PCI DVR cards provide inputs for multiple security cameras that connect to your computer.  This system uses your computer’s hard drive as the DVR.  The software that accompanies this card that allows the computer to control the cameras and store the digital video files is a type of security camera software.

 

Our third type applies specifically to IP ready digital video cameras, DVRs and servers, and systems.  The software is normally produced by the manufacturer of the security system and is designed to allow a computer to control, monitor, and record security video using the network.  As mentioned at the beginning of this article, it may be something as simple as a web browser, but it can also be a proprietary program produced by the security equipment manufacturer that is used to coordinate the video security system’s functions.  These may also be in the form of browser plug-ins such as ActiveX subroutines that must be installed in the browser before it is used with the system.

 

The fourth type of security camera software is Smartphone Apps which we have already described.

 

The fifth and final type of security camera software allows you to use a variety of video capture devices (such as webcams or capture cards) in conjunction with your computer to create your own digital video system.  While this does not create the ideal video security system, it does save money by allowing you to use equipment you have already purchased to create a digital video system.

 

IP Security Camera Software

There are lots of ways to network a digital video security and surveillance camera system.  Thanks to the digital age and the advancements of computer and Internet technology the Internet can be used as a medium for networking, allowing the user to have global access.  This is just one of the functions of Internet Protocol or IP security camera software.

 

IP security camera software may come with a variety of different functions.  For example its primary purpose may be just to make the camera IP ready so that it can transmit its video images over the Internet to the user.   These cameras are often called IP ready security cameras and it allows the user to place a camera just about anywhere there is access to broadband Internet.  The camera then transmits its videos over the Internet to a personal computer that has the IP security camera software installed.

 

This software contains the programming needed to communicate with the IP digital camera.  It normally runs as an active x function on Windows’ Internet Explorer and other browsers so the user can monitor his/her camera simply by using a compatible browser.  If the camera is a Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ camera, the IP security camera software may even provide the necessary programming so that the user can operate the controls to the PTZ via the Browser.

 

Another type of IP security camera software uses the Internet as the vehicle for networking among IP cameras.   In other words, instead of the camera using RG-59 coaxial cable or other wiring to send its video images to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR, the camera simply plugs into a broadband Internet connection and once connected, uses the Internet to send its video image data to the NVR.

 

The NVR acts pretty much like a typical DVR however it is made for networking cameras and storing their video images via the Internet.  Some NVRs require that a certain type or brand of camera be used and some NVRs also restrict the use of the NVR and IP cameras to one physical location.  The NVR coordinates the IP system, including the cameras, file storage, and playback.

 

So why use IP cameras and IP security camera software?  In this age of global communication, many workers perform a great deal of traveling.  Using and IP camera with IP security camera software, it’s possible to monitor your IP cameras in Maine while you are in Hawaii.  You can also often gain access to the cameras using smartphones and a special type of IP security camera software designed specifically for smartphones called an “application” or just simply put, “an app.”

 

Another example for using IP camera systems is that you may have cameras located in totally different geographical areas.  However, you may want to record these cameras from a totally different location (a home office for example).  Perhaps you own 2 or 3 convenient stores in your area and want to be able to monitor them from your home office.  You simply connect the IP camera to the Internet, set up your NVR, and you can monitor all three locations at once from a totally different location than any of your cameras (home office for example).

 

These are just some of the ways that an IP camera system can be used.  If you prefer to take advantage of professional full time monitoring of your cameras IP camera software can also make it possible for the monitoring company to see each of your cameras.

 

Usually, IP security camera software is provided by the camera manufacturer or the NVR manufacturer so you seldom ever need to purchase the software separately.  Security Camera King has another type of IP security camera software called a Mobile Video Server and in comes in 4, 8, and 16 channel capability.

 

This software allows the user to embed a live stream of one or more cameras on a web page.  This means that any Web browser that can play streaming video will be able to view the cameras.  Of course smartphones, PDA’s, and the like will be able to view them too.

 

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Auto-Tracking Dome Camera

Written By:
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

Have you tried an auto-tracking dome camera?  Be careful if you do because once you get hooked on them, it is pretty difficult to keep you from getting more.  These cameras represent some of the highest quality electronics available today.

What is an “Auto-tracking Dome Camera?”  It’s a special type of PTZ (Pan-Tilt-Zoom) camera that can lock onto moving objects and follow them where ever they go (within line of sight to the camera).

To use such a camera you first need to install it, and then set it up, and finally let it work so you don’t have too!  Auto-tracking Dome Cameras have circuitry built right in that allows them to recognize a moving object, get a lock on the target , and follow it until it leaves the area of the Field of View for the camera.

This is particularly useful if you require constant live monitoring of your security system.  For example, if you were using this camera in a parking lot, not only could you set it to watch cars come and go, but it could even track the people getting out of the cars.

Security Camera King offers two different auto tracking dome cameras, both made by Veilux.  Product# VP-ATDNC27X has an optical zoom of 27X and an additional digital zoom of 10X.  This means the total zoom effect attainable with these cameras would be up to 270X.  In addition here are some of the features of this camera:

  • 520 TVL high resolution output;
  • Minimum illumination is 1.0 Lux for day mode and .5 for night mode;
  • Automatic stabilization of images by reduced flicker;
  • Motion tracking, Intelligent Surveillance with an alarm function;
  • Preset, auto cruise and specified pattern scan function;
  • 360 degree continuous pan;
  • 0 to 9 degree tilt from horizontal plane as well as auto flip 180 degrees;
  • Iris, focus, and white balance;
  • Backlight compensation;
  • Wide Dynamic Range (WDR); and,
  • Outdoor version is IP66 rated for use out doors;

The second camera is very similar to the latter, with some slight advantageous changes.  Product# SVP-ATDN36X has an optical zoom of 36X and an additional digital zoom of 10X.  This means the total zoom effect attainable for this model would be 360X.  This camera is vary similar to the previously mentioned model so the features list will only include those features or items that are different:

  • 540 TVL high resolution output;
  • Minimum illumination is 0.1 Lux for day mode and 0.01 Lux for night; and,
  • Heater and blower included in outdoor model.

It’s only fair to note that PTZ cameras that can be controlled remotely, when coupled with special software on the DVR, can also track or follow objects.  However, in this case instead of the technology lying with the camera, it is actually the DVR that contains the software and does the work.  It uses software to analyze the video sent to it, and then initiates the commands to the camera to PTZ so as to stay with the object tracking it.

So as you can see today’s digital video camera systems can handle some pretty complex tasks without the need for any human interruption.  What’s more is that on PTZ camera mounted in the proper place may often be able to take the place of 3 or even 4 stationary cameras.  Even though the PTZ camera may be in the moderate price range this fact alone helps to reduce costs, if not directly than at least indirectly.

Another added value feature of Security Camera King’s DVRs is that all but the Elite Mini Economy can control PTZ cameras with just a mouse.  Point to where you want to go, and the PTZ camera aims there.  However, if you prefer more conventional means of control, Security Camera King does sell a separate PTZ control that has a joystick and a keyboard designed specifically for use with PTZ cameras.

If you have any additional questions about auto-tracking dome cameras please feel free to contact one of our security experts vie on-line live chat or by telephone at 866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6 PM EST.

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