Posts Tagged ‘ pan tilt zoom’



Pan Tilt Zoom Camera

Written By:
Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

The Pan Tilt Zoom camera or PTZ is one of the most versatile dome cameras on the market today. Not only does it offer the standard electronic features of most other dome cameras, but the PTZ can do just that–Pan, Tilt, and Zoom.

In the video industry, Panning is the ability of the camera to about a horizontal plane, simply put turning from left to right and all the way around in a circle.  Tilting refers to the cameras ability to move about a vertical axis, once again simply put up and down.  With no walls, poles, or mounts to impede the view, a pan tilt zoom camera can easily maneuver its lens in any position equal or greater to that of an area covering 1/2 sphere.

In addition Pan Tilt Zoom cameras have the ability to change their focal length such to allow a field of vision that can range from “wide angle” to “Close-up” depending on the lens.  This lens movement and/or electronic (digital) action is called Zoom.

Pan Tilt Zoom cameras usually have a motorized mechanism that moves the camera about the axis, although some may also be able to perform these functions on a limited basis electronically.  When this technology is coupled with motion detection or object (shape) detection, the PTZ camera can be elevated in application from not only its PTZ functions but can also perform auto-tracking and following.

Security Camera King (SCK) offers a variety of Pan Tilt Zoom Cameras which range in price from $199.95 to $985.99.  SCK’s PTZ-LX550L3X is an affordable solution for a PTZ camera priced at $199.95 with a resolution of 550 TVL!  This camera has a 3X Zoom lens with 360 degree continuous rotation pan.  It can tilt from 0 to 90 degrees and flip.  The maximum pan speed is 60/sec, tilt 30/sec, and the present speed is 100/sec.

The PTZ-LX550L3X offers 32 preset points with pattern tours including programmable 16 preset point number and dwell time/speed.  The camera can auto scan as well as be programmed to auto return to its home position.  This camera is rated IP66 for outdoor use so it can be used as an indoor or outdoor camera.

Our PTZ-HN03100 is the perfect solution for a hands down high quality Pan Tilt Zoom camera that works well with any of our featured Digital Video Recorders or DVRs.  This camera is also a super high resolution camera weighing in at 540 TVL.  It is vandal proof, IP66 rated with the outdoor mount, has auto gain control, auto white balance, and an on-screen display.  In addition it offers 10X optical and 10X digital for a combined 100X zoom capability.

Next in line is our SVP-54CDN10X 540 TVL Mini Dome Surveillance Camera.  This is a Veilux camera and as many of our customers attest on their reviews, you can’t go wrong with a Veilux when it comes to quality.  This mini camera may be small but it delivers BIG results.  It offers true day/night with color day time video and black and white when the ambient light becomes less than .02 Lux.

This camera offers up to 256 presets and it offers high speed pan and tilt.  This camera even comes with its own wall mount!  Priced at $664.50 it’s a professional level camera that offers professional results.

SCK offers two different models of auto tracking Pan Tilt Zoom cameras.  The first, Product# VP-ATDNC27X is priced at $707.69 and includes day/night capture and 27X zoom.  Once again this is a Veilux brand camera and stands for high quality.  The second model is SCK’s SVP-ATDN36X and is also a Veilux camera similar to the first with the major difference being an increase in zoom capability to 36X.

Regardless of the model you choose, a Pan Tilt Zoom camera is a versatile, powerful, and cost savings camera.  When these camera are placed properly, one camera can easily replace the need for 2, 3, or 4 otherwise stationary cameras.  In addition, if standard non-PTZ cameras were used, these Pan Tilt Zoom Cameras also offer the powerful zoom function that allows you to get in close.

If you are interested in purchasing a Pan Tilt Zoom camera or would like more information, please contact one of our Security Specialists today.

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Security Video Cameras

Written By:
Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

Security video cameras are one of three major components of today’s digital video security systems which also consist of a Digital Video Recorder or DVR and one or more monitors.  The digital video camera is an interesting piece of electronic wonder, and as technology continues to advance so do the features and abilities of the security video camera.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how a security video camera operates.  We’ll also take a look at some of the more common features and options that are available on today’s digital video security cameras.

Security video cameras are electronic based devices that transfer light images into electrical images that can be viewed on a monitor.   One of the key factors in accomplishing this is the electronic sensor that is used inside the camera to do the conversion.  Cameras make use of one of two different technologies with either one yielding the same end result.

 

These sensors are called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  The lenses focus the light image onto this small sensor chip (most range from about 1/4 inch 1/2 inch square).  The chip is sensitive to light energy in such a way that when light strikes the chip and electrical impulse is created that can be measured and used to construct a video image.

Ironically, even in digital security video cameras, the video signal that is created is originally analog in nature.   The signal is passed through a special Integrated Circuit or IC chip known as a analog-to-digital converter as well as a Digital Signal Processor or DSP before it is sent out the camera to the DVR.  In most systems the signal is sent along a cable (RG-59, CAT5, etc) from the camera directly to the DVR or monitor; hence the often used phrase “Closed Circuit TeleVision” or CCTV.

Once the video data reaches the DVR, it must be worked on some more by the DVRs DSP.  The data is gathered or compiled into a file called a digital video file.  Security video cameras create digital video files that can be played back by most personal computers and DVD players.  This digital video file is actually several digital photographs taken in raped succession over a very short time (usually around 30 photographs or frames per second or 30 fps).

The digital video file can quickly become several Gigabytes in size, especially when there are multiple cameras (which is usually the norm) recording at the same time.  There fore to make handling of the file easier for the processor and to get the maximum amount of time-recording per given storage capacity, the file is reduced to a fraction of its original size.

This is done by a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility.  The utility may be hardwired (usually an IC chip) or it may exist in the form of software.  Basically, a CODEC is a mathematical algorithm that finds a way to store repetitive data only once, thereby reducing file size while maintaining video quality.  Security Camera King’s DVRs all use the latest, most efficient CODEC known as H.264.

Security video cameras come in a variety of shapes, sizes, features, and price ranges.  Covering all of these variations is by far, beyond the capacity of this article, however we will attempt to try to cover some of the more popular characteristics.  If you would like additional more specific information on a camera variation, try searching our knowledge base for more information.

 

There are basically four types of security video cameras based on shape.  They are:

  • Box cameras;
  • Bullet cameras;
  • Dome cameras; and,
  • A variety of different hidden or disguised cameras that take the shape of the device they are built into.

These cameras are further made in one of three different styles based on where they are intended to be used.  These are:

  • Indoor cameras;
  • Outdoor cameras; and,
  • Indoor/Outdoor cameras.

In addition, cameras can come with a myriad of features.  Depending on the manufacturer and camera model, some features may be considered standard issue for the camera while others will be considered an option, usually with an additional cost:

  • Infrared night vision;
  • Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ);
  • Motion detection;
  • Very high resolution output;
  • Audio capability;
  • Internet compatible;
  • Explosion proof; and,
  • Wireless.

Generally speaking, if you have a specific security video camera need, there’s one out there that can nicely fit the bill.

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Web Ready DVR Security System

Written By:
Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

Security Camera King features several different digital video security systems and each of them is a web ready DVR security system. We take pride in offering the highest-quality most up-to-date security merchandise, and that includes our web ready Elite Mini, Elite Series, and Ultimate Series Digital Video Recorders or DVRs.

These days everyone’s work and personal situation is different so versatility is the key to digital video camera security system that can work for all. Security Camera Kings do-it-yourself security systems are easy to install and a cinch to set-up and operate. What’s more, since each DVR is a web ready DVR security system, once installed you can access your system anywhere in the world where there is broadband internet access, and that includes using your 3G or 4G smartphone.

There are several ways of using the Internet with digital video security system components. These components are usually designated as IP or Internet Protocol ready, such as an IP Digital Video Security Camera. They are also referred to as “Web ready” such as a Web ready DVR security system. In the following article, we’ll take a look at the differences between IP ready cameras and IP or Web ready DVR security systems and look at some of the benefits or features of a Web ready system.

Web ready digital video cameras are different from ordinary digital video cameras in that they do not directly connect to the DVR. In fact, Web ready cameras don’t have to connect to a DVR at all. Web ready or IP cameras use the internet as a vehicle for networking. They can connect to a DVR remotely, thousands of miles away, via the internet. They can also be viewed and controlled via the internet.

Each IP ready camera contains its own web server technology and connects directly to the Internet via a broadband internet connection. The connection is usually via a Cat 5 Ethernet cable or wirelessly to a wireless broadband modem or router. Of course, most are WiFi compatible. The camera’s digital information is streamed over the Internet. It may be downloaded and saved on a personal computer or Internet connected DVR and it can also be viewed live using a personal computer, a Web browser, and an Internet Connection.

Another way of taking advantage of the versatility of the Internet is by using a web ready DVR security system. Like the IP digital video camera, the DVR contains the Web server technology. However, having a web ready DVR security system is far more powerful that just a Web ready camera.

In a typical Web ready DVR security system, each camera connects directly to the DVR first. It may do this using a video data transmission cable such as an RG-59 Siamese cable or it may connect wirelessly using an on-board transmitter and a corresponding receiver that is connected to the DVR. The system can be used like any non-web ready system. The cameras send their video data to the DVR unit which also includes a Digital Signal Processor that runs on an operating system. The unit compiles the camera’s data and creates a digital video file that can be stored on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or viewed live on a monitor.

However, since the Web ready DVR security system is connected to the Internet, the cameras may also be monitored remotely, anywhere in the world there is broadband internet access (including smartphones). You can even record them remotely, as well as on the parent DVR. But there are some additional benefits as well.

For example, any Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera not only can be monitored remotely but can be controlled remotely via the Web ready DVR Internet connection. Security Camera King’s featured systems support two-way audio over the Internet as well. Further, the DVRs support up to 10 network or Internet users simultaneously.

Also, many web ready DVR security systems require a static IP address that normally will cost extra through your Internet Service Provider or ISP. Our web ready systems use Dynamic DNS support, which means a static IP address is not necessary.

Last but not least, our Web ready DVR security systems also support standard POP email accounts. This means you can program the system to email you anywhere at anytime based on several different triggers that you set.

So when it comes to versatility Security Camera King’s Web ready DVR security systems do it all.

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Digital Surveillance Software

Written By:
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

The term “digital surveillance software” refers to a broad category of computer based sets of instructions that provides the instructions for either a computer or a computer based device to operate, control, and/or process binary (digital) data used or created for security and surveillance purposes. To narrow this definition down a little for the purpose of this article, digital surveillance software is the collective set of programming used to create digital video images for security and surveillance purposes.

Since the words “digital surveillance software” refer to such a broad definition, it may be easier to explain what it is based on how it is used and what it does. There are basically three broad categories of digital surveillance software. The first applies to standalone digital video security and surveillance systems; the second applies to personal computer based digital video security and surveillance systems; and the third and final category, for the purpose of our discussion, applies to smartphones and similar type devices used with digital video and surveillance software.

Standalone Digital Video Security Systems
A standalone digital video security system is a set of devices that are used for security or surveillance purposes to create digital video files that may or may not be recorded. The term “standalone” indicates that these systems do not require any additional assistance from exterior devices such as a computer. The digital surveillance software used in these systems can include the operating system of the Digital Video Recorder’s or DVR’s and any additional programs used on that system to control the various devices of the standalone system

A standalone digital video security and surveillance system in its basic configuration includes one or more digital video cameras, a DVR unit with a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, and a digital based monitor. In a standalone system, the cameras send their digital video data to the DVR where the DSP compiles the data using a CODEC or COmpression/DECompression utility to create digital video files. The files are then viewed on the digital monitor and or stored for later use on a hard disk drive on the DVR.

The digital surveillance software in this system can include:
1) The operating system of the DVR/DSP unit;
2) The CODEC utility program; and,
3) Any other specialized set of instructions to control the equipment.

For example, Security Camera King offers three major types of DVRs; our Elite mini series, or Elite series, and our Ultimate series. These standalone systems have a highly specialized DSP that creates digital video files and coordinates the functions between the three major devices of the system. This is usually referred to as the “operating system” and all of our units use a Linux based operating system.

The CODEC utility is a specific software program that is used to compile the video data into a digital video file. Digital video is actually several digital photographs taken in succession. Different rates may be used but a general standard is 29.9 frames per second or fps. This means the camera takes 29 digital pictures in one second so in one minute of video, the camera takes approximately 1800 pictures. You can see how the file size can become enormously large in a very short period of time.

The CODEC uses mathematical algorithms so the file size is a fraction of the original total size. This piece of digital surveillance software does this with very little loss of quality. There are many different types of CODECs such as MJPEG, MPG, H.264, etc.

A standalone system may also contain digital surveillance software that operates the equipment, including specialized functions. For example, Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ cameras can move horizontally, vertically, and can enlarge objects. These movements may be controlled by digital surveillance software.

Personal Computer Digital Video Security Systems
There are digital video security systems that utile a personal computer to take the place of the DVR, DSP, and or monitor. Normally these systems contain a PCI card or similar printed circuit board that performs the bulk of the systems needs including storing the digital video files, controlling devices, and displaying the video on the computer’s monitor.

Any of the software associated with these functions, in essence, can be considered digital surveillance software.

Smartphones
Smartphones require small programs in order to adapt or interface with different systems and devises. These programs are called applications or “apps.” An app can also be of a digital surveillance software type.

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Wireless IP Security Camera

Written By:
Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

One of the more recent digital video security camera system components is the wireless IP security camera. These cameras use the Internet as a network medium for the purpose of transmitting their digital video images and for allowing the user to control the camera remotely. This places the maximum power of remote accessibility as well as easy installation in the hands of the user.

It seems as if all of our electronic devices today utilize or have some sort of affiliation with, the Internet. So why shouldn’t the digital video security industry take advantage of its seemingly ubiquitous presence and cost-efficient use as well? That’s exactly what a wireless IP (Internet Protocol ready) security camera does.

By using a wireless IP security camera you can monitor your business in Ft. Lauderdale while on vacation in Tokyo. If you have a Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ wireless IP security camera you can even control the camera from Tokyo moving the camera horizontally, vertically, or even zooming in on an object. You can do all this anywhere there is a broadband Internet connection and an available desktop or laptop computer and even using a 3G or 4G smartphone.

How is this possible? In the following article we’ll discuss what’s inside a wireless IP security camera and how it works, especially with the internet.

A wireless IP security camera differs from a typical digital video camera in several ways. First, a standard digital video security camera is connected to a processing and storage unit called a Digital Video Recorder or DVR. The camera is normally connected to the unit by running an RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable from each camera to the DVR. The camera transmits its video data over the cable to the DVR where it is compiled into a digital video file that is stored on a hard disk drive and may be viewed live on a digital camera security monitor at the same time.

On the other hand, a wireless IP security camera doesn’t use an RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable or any other video transmission cable. This camera has a built-in transmitter that sends its signal using IEEE802.11 or WiFi radio technology. The camera may or may not, depending on the type, also process the video data into a digital video file before being transmitted from the camera. In addition, when the signal leaves a wireless IP security camera it may be sent to an IP ready DVR over the internet, or it can be sent to any other receiving device (such as a computer or smartphone).

A wireless IP security camera also has its own built in web server technology. This allows one camera to capture video, create digital video files, and send them (using streaming technology) over the Internet to a variety of devices already mentioned. Accessing the camera is as easy as opening a standard web browser on your computer and entering the camera’s Internet address and a password. Even smartphones and similar devices such as iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android, Symbian, and Windows mobile phones can remotely view and control the camera as well.

It’s important to note that a wireless IP security camera and an IP DVR system are different. The IP security camera makes a direct connection to the Internet via a wireless broadband modem or router. An IP DVR system on the other hand uses various wireless technologies to connect the cameras to the DVR FIRST. The DVR is than connected to the Internet via a variety of broadband Internet connections.

Note: For IP DVRs smartphones will require an application (app). For the iPhone and similar devices the application is available for free from the iPhone App Store on your phone. For all other types, Security Camera King offers the app for free when you download it from their website. As an additional note, please remember that the app only works with Security Camera Kings Elite Mini, Elite, and Ultimate DVRs with HDMI output. It will not work with any other type of DVR or any of Security Camera Kings DVRs.

Ultimately then, a wireless IP security camera can use the Internet to send digital video images to a variety of computers and smartphones or it can utilize the Internet as a network medium to connect several cameras to an IP ready DVR.

If you have any additional questions about a wireless IP security camera contact one of our security experts via “Live Chat” or telephone today.

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