Posts Tagged ‘ RG-59 coaxial cable’



BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power Cable

Written By:
Friday, April 8th, 2011

The BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power Cable is one item offered by Security Camera King (SCK) that combines two functions into one unit.  This cable provides the means for both video transmission from the digital video security camera to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR and the power supply from the power distribution box or plug-in transformer to the camera.

Video transmission signals are a special type of radio frequency signal.  These signals can be transported in many different ways.  For example, digital video cameras can send the video transmissions wirelessly using on-board transmitters and antennas to corresponding wireless receivers.  The other option involves using wires or cable.

There are many different types of wiring or cable that can be used as video transmission cable for digital video security cameras.  CAT5 Ethernet Twisted pair cable, for example, can be used to send video transmission signals depending on the strength of the signal and the length of the cable run.

The most popular type of cable however, is RG-59 Coaxial Cable.  This cable is advantageous for several reasons.  First it provides a prefect medium for which the signal can travel without excessive degradation of the signal.  Secondly, it is sheathed to prevent interference to the signal.  BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power Cable is RG-59 coaxial cable.

Our BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power cable is pre-cut to a length of exactly 100 feet.  Each end of the cable has a pre-installed female BNC type connector for connecting the camera end and the DVR end of the cable.  There is no need to mess with cutting or stripping wire and twisting or crimping connectors since that is already done for you.

In addition, our BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power Cable also contains a one pair (two wire) DC power supply cable.   This cable is terminated on each end with one male and one female PT-3 2.5mm power plug for easy connection to the camera and the power supply.

This video transmission cable is also shielded to prevent interference from the proximity tot he power cable and from any outside sources.  The impedance of the BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power Cable video transmission cable is 75 ohms.

The “BNC” in BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power cable doesn’t refer to the cable as much as it does the connector type.  In fact, most cable used with BNC fittings is RG-59 coaxial cable (and not BNC cable).

The BNC is a radio frequency connector that is commonly used with coaxial cable for television, radio, and other radio-frequency related type equipment.  BNC is an acronym that is used when referring to these special connectors.  In fact, the “B” in BNC-100 CCTV Video and Power cable stands for bayonet mount, the actual locking mechanism used by these connectors.  When to connectors (a male and a female type) are joined together, they are pushed into one another and twisted by their “collar” to lock them together.  Just like the way a bayonet is mounted on a rifle.

 

The remaining two letters of BNC stand for its inventors, Paul Neill and Carl Councelman.  One must agree that BNC is a much easier way of referring to the connector than by saying “Bayonet, Neill, and Councelman” connector.

 

If you have any further questions about the BNC-100 CCTV Video and power cable or BNC connectors or would like to purchase the cable please contact one of our security experts either by on-line “Live Chat” or by telephone at 866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6PM EST.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

CCTV Digital Camera

Written By:
Monday, January 31st, 2011

If the Digital Video Recorder or DVR is the heart of a digital video security system, then the CCTV digital camera must be the eyes. The cameras used today are top-notch technological wonders that provide high quality color video images. The have a vast selection of optional features that make their use extremely flexible and easy to use under almost any application.

A Closed Circuit Television or CCTV digital camera are the eyes of a digital security system because they are the devices that “see and capture” the action. There are many types of CCTV digital cameras available but they all “see and capture” using one of two similar methods. To describe how a CCTV digital camera works without getting too technical, we’ll tell you about their sensors and other parts of the cameras and how they integrate to get the job done.

Let’s divide the average CCTV digital camera into three parts: 1) The lens; 2) The sensor; and, 3) The analog-to-digital converter and all other supporting electronics.

The Lens
There are essentially two different type of lenses used in CCTV digital cameras. The first we’ll mention is the “fixed lens.” The fixed lens is so named because the focal length of the lens is stationary or fixed. This indicated that the lens as a definite range of focus as well as a fixed field of view. These lenses are excellent for cameras that are used in applications where the distance between the subject or object being recorded and the camera is usually constant. Examples of these uses include retail store shoplifting coverage, equipment monitoring, gate entrance monitoring, room surveillance, etc.

The varifocal lenses have a variable focal length. This means that these lenses can zoom in or zoom out on subjects or objects and be manually focused. This lens is a bit more expensive than a fixed lens. Applications for this lens would include uses where the camera position is changed on a regular basis or the field of view is changed often.

Either type of lens has basically the same function: Manipulate the light emitted by the image in the camera’s field of vision, so that it presents an incredibly high quality image that is focused on the cameras incredibly small sensor.

The Sensor
There are also two different type of lenses used in CCTV digital cameras. They take the focused light image and convert it into tiny electrical charges that can be used to create a digital video file or image. The two sensors used are the Charged Coupled Device or CCD and the Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS. At one time the CCD produced a high quality image than the CMOS at a slightly higher cost in price for the sensor. The CMOS on the other hand, used far less electricity to complete the task of creating the electronic video image. As time and technology progresses, the newer CCDs use less electricity and the newer CMOSs produce a higher quality image so that they are relatively similar in power usage, quality and cost.

Whether it’s a CCD or a CMOS, the sensor, with the help of supporting electronic circuitry, pass the image which at this point is in analog format, to the analog-to-digital converter.

The Analog-to-Digital Converter
CCTV digital cameras produce their finished product, the video image, in a binary or digital format. Since the equipment used along the way to produce the image does so basically using analog methods, the analog-to-digital converter is necessary to transform the analog signal into digital data. This converter is usually a relatively small Integrated Circuit (IC) chip that is designed specifically for this purpose. It must be very powerful and extremely fast in order to convert the signal for use in real-time (live).

When the signal leaves the analog-to-digital converter, it is now in digital form and ready to be sent to the DVR and/or monitor. This is done by one of two different methods as well. Either the signal is carried to the DVR using a video transmission cable (which in most cases is an RG-59 coaxial cable), or wirelessly converting the signal into a radio signal that can be transmitted for the camera to a corresponding receiver.

This should give you some working knowledge on how a CCTV digital camera works. If you need additional information or considering a purchase, please contact one of our security experts today using on-line “Live Chat” or by toll-free telephone at 866-573-8878.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Web Ready Security Camera System

Written By:
Monday, January 10th, 2011

If you need to be able to monitor your security and surveillance system cameras from just about anywhere in the world at any time, consider using a web ready security camera system. These systems use the internet as the vehicle for transmitting their data so anywhere there is broadband internet access, there is potential for monitoring your home or business security camera system.

A web ready security camera system is reasonably priced, easy to install, and easy to operate thanks to technological advancements in the electronics and computer fields over the past few years. It differs from a standalone digital video security camera system in that it utilizes the internet to transmit the signals, and a personal computer or Mac computer to monitor and store the digital video image files.

A standalone, non-web ready security camera system consists of one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder (DVR) with a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), and a monitor. The digital video camera captures the reflective light from objects and transposes these light images into electronic images. The camera normally has an on-board analog-to-digital processing chip that changes the electronic information into pure digital or binary form.

A video transmission cable, usually an RG-59 coaxial cable, must be run from each camera to the DVR unit. The signals from the cameras travel through this cable to the DVR unit where the DSP compiles them into a digital video file. Digital video files can be extremely large in size so the DSP uses a COmpression/DECompression (CODEC) utility to shrink the size of the file without sacrificing a large amount of quality. After the digital video file is created it can be viewed live on a monitor or stored on the DVR’s Hard Disk Drive (HDD) for later use.

A web ready security camera system produces the same sort of final results but goes about doing it in a different way. First a web ready security camera system has either IP (Internet Protocol ready) cameras or an IP DVR or an IP server. If the system uses IP ready cameras, each camera has its own built in web server technology that is used for the Internet. The camera connects to the internet either via a Cat 5 Ethernet wire or wirelessly using a corresponding wireless modem or router.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP DVR, then normal cameras are connected to the DVR and the system works like a typical standalone system. Except that the DVR (and therefore the digital video files and camera controls) can be controlled remotely via the internet and some other end-user device.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP server, it may be able to digitize older analog based cameras and send them over the Internet or it may simply combine the signals of several newer digital cameras and send them over the Internet. In either case, the digital video file must be sent over the internet to a connected computer that can act as a storage and monitor device or to some other web-compatible monitoring device such as an iPhone, iPad, 3G and 4G smartphones and other similar devices. (Note that if the signal is received by another DVR or personal computer, the system does not have a device to save digital video files to and therefore can only be used to monitor the cameras in real-time).

Probably the most profound advantage of web ready security camera systems is the incredibly almost infinite geographic locations in the world where the system can be monitored and operated. Theoretically, anywhere there is broadband Internet accessibility; the system can be monitored and controlled.

Perhaps the biggest disadvantage to these types of systems is that since they are connected to the internet, a very public domain, they may be susceptible to hacker intervention and even computer viruses.

All in all, there is nothing that can provide you with such extensive capability to monitor and control your system remotely than a web ready security camera system. If you need more information or would like to purchase a web ready security camera system, please contact one of Security Camera King’s security experts today either via live chat or telephone.

digital video file
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Wireless PC Compatible Security Camera

Written By:
Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Nothing can offer you the peace of mind in security and the power and flexibility of application and use like a wireless PC compatible security camera. Thanks to modern electronic technology advancements and the growth of internet applications, a wireless PC compatible security camera is also reasonably priced to be affordable for just about any budget.

What exactly is a wireless PC compatible security camera and how does it work? We’ll attempt to answer these questions in the following article in order to give you a better understanding of the device and help you to decide if it is right for your security and monitoring application.

Before we talk about a wireless PC compatible security camera, let’s describe a basic standalone system first. A standard digital video security camera system usually consists of one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor. The digital video cameras are connected to the DVR by a video transmission cable, usually RG-59 coaxial cable. A cable must be run from each camera to the DVR unit.

The camera(s) captures light images and converts them into electronic video images. It also converts the data created for this into digital or binary form using an on-board analog-to-digital processing chip. The digital data is sent to the DVR where a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, a highly specialized computer processor dedicated to making videos, uses the data to create a digital video file. The digital video file can be viewed in real-time (live) and/or saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive for later viewing, copying, etc.

A wireless PC compatible security camera captures the image and creates the digital video image in the same manner. However, it differs by transmitting the initial digital data from the camera wirelessly and by storing the data on a PC’s hard disk drive. Basically it eliminates the use of a standalone DVR and processor unit as well as a separate monitor. This has advantages and disadvantages that we will discuss later.

Most wireless PC compatible security cameras are their own little system. The camera captures the image, transfers it into digital form, creates a type of digital video file and then sends it via an on-board transmitter to a corresponding wireless internet connection such as a wireless router or wireless modem. The camera unit usually has its own IP address that identifies it on the Internet.

Using a common Internet browser, the user can access the secure camera with a username and password, and monitor as well as control some functions remotely from any personal computer, Mac computer, Apple iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and even 3G and 4G smartphones. Some cameras have the ability to move horizontally and/or vertically to increase the range of the camera’s field of vision and may be able to enlarge objects in the field of vision. These cameras called Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ cameras can be controlled remotely from a computer Internet browser as well.

These cameras normally use MPEG4 or MJPEG video compression to reduce the size of the digital video file to make it easier to send via the internet. Generally, you need not be an IT professional to install and operate these cameras. All you need to do for most wireless PC compatible security cameras is mount the camera and install some software from a CD onto your computer or download an application (app) to your smart phone and your ready to go.

These systems use the PC to replace the standalone DVR unit and monitor. If the user wants to record the video files for archiving or later viewing they can normally save them on their computer’s hard drive. If they choose to view them live, they can watch them on the computer’s monitor using most common internet browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, etc.

As mentioned earlier, there are advantages and disadvantages to using wireless PC compatible security camera systems instead of standalone systems. Probably the greatest single advantage is lower cost due to the fact that a standalone DVR or monitor is not required as an existing personal computer can be used instead. Also, since the Internet is the medium for distributing the final video file, the cameras can be remotely accessed from anywhere in the world there is broadband internet access.

There are disadvantages. The system could be prone to computer viruses, Internet bog downs, and using so much of your personal computer’s resources that it effects the computer’s performance for doing other tasks.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Construction Site Security Camera Surveillance

Written By:
Friday, December 17th, 2010

If you are looking to increase security in your work zone, consider using construction site security camera surveillance. Digital video security camera systems can help prevent theft of construction site materials, notify you and help prevent intrusion by trespassers, and even monitor the site for safety issues during the work period. In addition, construction site security camera surveillance is an excellent means for providing owners/investors with the ability to follow progress as the construction project proceeds.

Before the technological advances in the digital security system industry, it may have been difficult and costly to obtain construction site security camera surveillance. However, with the advent of new technology including digital video cameras, wireless technology, and Internet Protocol (IP) ready systems, construction site security camera surveillance is reasonably priced and easy to provide, and easy to install.

For particularly large construction jobs, the use of construction site security camera surveillance can reduce or eliminate the need for security guards or a security team. In addition, large jobs can have several cameras or if necessary, multiple systems to provide complete perimeter and site surveillance; indoors our out.

There are so many different types of cameras and systems available that their application is incredibly versatile to the point that there are very few construction site applications where construction site security camera surveillance can’t be used. Let’s take a look at some of these security camera system features and how they can apply to a construction site.

Generally, the number of cameras (also called “channels”) available in a given system is determined by the DVR. The most common DVR types can accept up to four, eight, or sixteen camera inputs. One of these DVRs should accommodate your needs, however if you require more than sixteen cameras, two or more systems can be setup in tandem.

Digital video security cameras require a power supply and a video transmission cable (usually an RG-59 coaxial cable) that must be run from each camera to the DVR. If these cabling hookups aren’t practical for your situation, wireless battery operated cameras can be used instead. Wireless cameras contain their own built-in transmitter and on board antenna that is used to send the video signal via radio waves to a corresponding receiver.

Wireless cameras make use of a variety of different wireless technologies but probably the most common type used today is the 2.8 or 5.8 GHz technology. This is the same technology used to transmit wireless land-line based telephone conversations. It’s incredibly effective and free of interference and can have a relatively long range. Some wireless cameras boast up to a two mile range to the receiver.

These ranges are called “Line of Sight” or LOS ranges because the range specification given by the manufacturer is based on a transmission route between the camera and receiver in a line of sight, meaning without any obstructions between the two. Although objects within the LOS generally reduce the effective range, they seldom prevent reception. If there is an obstruction, the material of the object will determine the reduction in range. Be certain to check the range of wireless cameras before purchasing them to make sure they meet your specific range requirements.

In addition to the wireless transmission feature, some cameras can be operated by batteries (either rechargeable or disposable) instead of a power supply plugged into 120 volt AC service. Even better, cameras can also be purchased with an on-board motion detector.

Construction site security camera surveillance is generally concerned more with activity than non-active video so the motion-detector wireless battery operated camera is an excellent choice. The motion detector is a PIR (Passive InfraRed) sensor that can detect the change in infrared signatures in the camera’s field of view. If a change is detected, it is assumed that this was created by some sort of motion and the PIR connected internally to a relay in the camera housing, turns the camera on to record. The PIR sensor uses significantly less battery power than the camera, increasing the usable life of the batteries.

There are many other options available for construction site security camera surveillance. Night time infrared cameras can record activity using an infrared light source which is invisible to the human eye. Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) DVR programs with PTZ cameras can actually track or follow an object or person.

Construction site security camera surveillance is a cost-efficient time proven method for preventing and documenting theft, vandalism, and even accidents. This is one tool your construction site shouldn’t be without.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail