Posts Tagged ‘ security camera system’



Internet Security Camera System

Written By:
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

Nothing has more “global” access in the digital video security camera industry than an Internet security camera system.  The outreach available for use and/or monitoring has been extended even further with the increased technology in cell phones, namely 3G and 4G broadband Internet access.  In the following article we’ll take a look at some Internet security camera systems and how they work.

First, let’s make sure we understand how a “non-Internet” security camera system works.   In this type of system, digital video security and surveillance cameras capture video footage and send the video data to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR.  The DVR stores the video on a hard disk drive (HDD) just like the HDD found in a personal computer.  In addition the DVR may also display the video in real-time (live) on one to many monitors for surveillance purposes.

The digital video camera is responsible for capturing a light image and transforming it into an electronic image.  It does this by using a lens to focus what can be a large field of vision onto a small electronic sensor which usually ranges in size from 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch square.

One of two different sensor chips is used for this purpose.  They are the Charged Coupled Device or CCD and the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS. When light strikes these sensors they emit electrical charges which can be measured and used to create a video image.  The data that is created by these chips is actually analog in form until it passes through an analog-to-digital converter chip.  Another highly specialized electronic chip called a Digital Signal Processor or DSP insures the integrity of the data and may make any corrections that are necessary.

At this point, the camera passes the digital data along to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR whose job is to record the data and store it as mentioned above.  It does this by compressing the file into a fraction of its original size but still managing to maintain a high quality.  It does this by using a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility.

An Internet security camera system is very similar to this type of system, however once the data becomes digital, it opens up a whole new world of possibilities, especially including the use of the Internet.  There are basically two types of Internet security camera systems.  One system consists of cameras that are Internet compatible also called Internet Protocol ready or IP ready.  The other system consists of a DVR that has its own Web server technology and is called IP ready as well.

IP ready cameras contain their own web server technology so that they maybe connected to the Internet.  Instead of sending their digital data directly to a DVR, they send their data via the Internet to anywhere there is a client that wants to access the information.  Generally these cameras use two CODECs at once.  Many of the cameras pass the information on to the DVR using the MJPEG CODEC while streaming the information via the Internet for live viewing using the latest CODEC H.264.

These cameras may direct their video via the Internet to a specific type of DVR that is designed for this purpose which is called a Network Video Recorder or NVR.  One of the advantages of this system is that multiple cameras in multiple locations can be recorded by the NVR.  These locations can be widespread, such as two or more commercial facilities that are located in two different cities.  An Internet security camera system of this type can lend itself to all sorts of networking possibilities.

Another type of Internet security camera system exists where the DVR is the IP ready device and it takes care of all Internet related inquiries.  In this system, the cameras are not IP ready and they send all of their digital data to the DVR.  The DVR then contains its own Web server technology and allows a client access to the system through the DVR.  All of Security Camera King’s featured DVRs have these feature built in to the DVR.

This internet security camera system records the video locally on the DVRs HDD, but it allows a user to control the DVR and in many instances, even the cameras (for example, PTZ movements) remotely.  As a matter of fact, these systems can ever be monitored and controlled using a smartphone and 3G or 4G Internet technology.

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Security Flood Light DVR Camera

Written By:
Thursday, January 20th, 2011

Nothing says “”Gotchya!” to a potential intruder, vandal, or burglar better than a security flood light DVR camera. Thanks to modern technological improvements these devices are an entire compact digital video security system. They can be used in both residential and commercial applications and can be extremely effective when placed in the proper location.

Not only does a security flood light DVR camera help to protect and prevent perpetrators from causing damage or breaking and entering, but it also offers positive deterrence. It’s already been proven by the law enforcement agencies in London, England and New York City that the mere presence of digital video cameras deters criminal activity.

However, the security flood light DVR camera takes it one step further. Not only does it record still digital photographs or digital video images of the intruder, but once the unit senses motion, it snaps on a powerful high wattage flood light illuminating the surrounding area and “spotlighting” the intruder as well.

In addition to protecting homes and businesses, these units are great for protecting other property as well. Boat docks with electricity, barns, storage areas, specific portions of land, back entrances of retail stores, and no-trespassing industrial areas as well can benefit from the protection of a security flood light DVR camera.

The units are relatively easy to install and use as well. Basically, all that is required for installation is to mount the unit, connect it to a standard residential type power line, and select the settings you desire. Then walk away and be confident that your security flood light DVR camera will protect you and/or your family, business, or property.

Before we provide some detail about the design and function of a standard security flood light DVR camera, let’s briefly describe a typical digital video security camera system and how it works.

Most standard digital video security camera systems contain one to several cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and perhaps a monitor. The cameras are mounted in various strategic locations and send their digital video data to the DVR unit by means of a digital video cable run from each camera to the unit, or wirelessly using radio signal transmitters and receivers.

The DVR unit, much like a highly specialized personal computer, contains a hard disk drive like those found in computers. The DVR unit processes the digital data and creates a digital video file that can be viewed live on a monitor and/or saved on the DVR for later use.

A security flood light DVR camera is basically a miniature version of the basic system without the monitor. The unit contains all the devices (sans the monitor) within one relatively small, compact fixture. The floodlight is usually a powerful 500 watt halogen flood lamp. These lights can project a powerful beam of light in a relatively wide field of vision.

Connected to the light, DVR, and the camera is an infrared motion detector. The motion detector, known as a PIR or Passive InfraRed sensor, can detect the infrared radiation emitted by the objects in its field of vision. When this “heat signature” changes greatly or rapidly, the sensor interprets this as motion. The sensor activates a relay that switches the security flood light, DVR, and camera on. Depending on the model, the entire unit switches off either after motion is no longer detected or specified time period after the initial “On” state.

When the camera is switched “on” it immediately begins capturing digital video images (or stills), with the flood light helping to provide a crisp, clear, bright picture. An on board processing chip saves the data either as digital photographs or digital video files to the DVR.

The DVR in this case is not a large hard disk drive, but usually consists of an SD card (Secured Digital card), a compact flash card, thumb drive or similar mini-portable memory device. All the user needs to do is remove the SD card, transfer the files to their personal computer and view, print, or make movies disks of the saved data.

Although a security flood light DVR camera cannot provide the extensive precise coverage of a full size standard digital video security system, it does offer an economical alternative and can be quite useful for specific situations. Contact our security experts via Live Chat or telephone if you have any addition questions or would like to make a purchase.

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Web Ready Security Camera System

Written By:
Monday, January 10th, 2011

If you need to be able to monitor your security and surveillance system cameras from just about anywhere in the world at any time, consider using a web ready security camera system. These systems use the internet as the vehicle for transmitting their data so anywhere there is broadband internet access, there is potential for monitoring your home or business security camera system.

A web ready security camera system is reasonably priced, easy to install, and easy to operate thanks to technological advancements in the electronics and computer fields over the past few years. It differs from a standalone digital video security camera system in that it utilizes the internet to transmit the signals, and a personal computer or Mac computer to monitor and store the digital video image files.

A standalone, non-web ready security camera system consists of one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder (DVR) with a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), and a monitor. The digital video camera captures the reflective light from objects and transposes these light images into electronic images. The camera normally has an on-board analog-to-digital processing chip that changes the electronic information into pure digital or binary form.

A video transmission cable, usually an RG-59 coaxial cable, must be run from each camera to the DVR unit. The signals from the cameras travel through this cable to the DVR unit where the DSP compiles them into a digital video file. Digital video files can be extremely large in size so the DSP uses a COmpression/DECompression (CODEC) utility to shrink the size of the file without sacrificing a large amount of quality. After the digital video file is created it can be viewed live on a monitor or stored on the DVR’s Hard Disk Drive (HDD) for later use.

A web ready security camera system produces the same sort of final results but goes about doing it in a different way. First a web ready security camera system has either IP (Internet Protocol ready) cameras or an IP DVR or an IP server. If the system uses IP ready cameras, each camera has its own built in web server technology that is used for the Internet. The camera connects to the internet either via a Cat 5 Ethernet wire or wirelessly using a corresponding wireless modem or router.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP DVR, then normal cameras are connected to the DVR and the system works like a typical standalone system. Except that the DVR (and therefore the digital video files and camera controls) can be controlled remotely via the internet and some other end-user device.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP server, it may be able to digitize older analog based cameras and send them over the Internet or it may simply combine the signals of several newer digital cameras and send them over the Internet. In either case, the digital video file must be sent over the internet to a connected computer that can act as a storage and monitor device or to some other web-compatible monitoring device such as an iPhone, iPad, 3G and 4G smartphones and other similar devices. (Note that if the signal is received by another DVR or personal computer, the system does not have a device to save digital video files to and therefore can only be used to monitor the cameras in real-time).

Probably the most profound advantage of web ready security camera systems is the incredibly almost infinite geographic locations in the world where the system can be monitored and operated. Theoretically, anywhere there is broadband Internet accessibility; the system can be monitored and controlled.

Perhaps the biggest disadvantage to these types of systems is that since they are connected to the internet, a very public domain, they may be susceptible to hacker intervention and even computer viruses.

All in all, there is nothing that can provide you with such extensive capability to monitor and control your system remotely than a web ready security camera system. If you need more information or would like to purchase a web ready security camera system, please contact one of Security Camera King’s security experts today either via live chat or telephone.

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Wireless Outdoor Security Camera Systems

Written By:
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

A wireless outdoor security camera system can be used for many different applications. The system is easy to install, easy to operate, and incredibly versatile in application. Since the wireless outdoor security camera does not require a video transmission cable to be run from each camera to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR, you may want to consider this system if cabling the system is impractical, undesirable, or simply can’t be done.

Standard standalone digital video security systems have three major components: 1) One to several digital video cameras; 2) A Digital Video Recorder or DVR; and, 3) one or more color monitors. The digital video cameras capture light images and turn them into electronic data that is sent to the DVR. The DVR creates a digital video file that can be viewed that instant (live) on the monitor and/or stored on the DVR for later viewing, archiving, etc.

These systems are connected by the use of various wires and cables. For instance, each digital video camera must have a coaxial cable run from the camera to the DVR unit. This video transmission cable is usually RG-59 type coaxial video transmission cable. It carries the video data from the camera to the DVR unit to be processed. Each camera also must have a smaller low-voltage DC wire run to it from either a power distribution supply box or a nearby plug-in transformer.

Wireless outdoor security camera systems eliminate the need to install the digital video transmission cable. Instead of using RG-59 coaxial cable the camera sends its video data to the DVR by radio wave signals. This is normally done in one of two ways. Either the camera sends its radio signal to a corresponding receiver which is located near the DVR unit and connected to it by cables, or the DVR unit itself has on-board receivers that the camera broadcasts its signal to.

The camera of a wireless outdoor security system may not be entirely wireless. Although there is no need to run the RG-59 coaxial cable in these systems, the cameras still require a power supply which is normally provided by the power distribution center box or a nearby plug-in transformer. However, there are cameras that are battery operated, using either one-time-use or rechargeable batteries. These cameras are truly wireless in that they have no video transmission cable or power supply wires run to them.

Since outdoor security camera systems do not require video transmission cabling, they can be much quicker and easier to install. Mount the camera, plug it in, and it’s ready. Even easier to install are the battery operated cameras; just mount the camera (no need to run a power supply wire) and it’s ready to go.

Wireless outdoor security camera system cameras use various technologies to send their radio signals to the designated receiver or DVR. One of the most popular methods that is used is the 2.4 or 5.8 MHz technology; this is the same technology used to send land-line based cordless telephone signals. It’s useful for this purpose because the signal is strong and virtually interference free.

It is important to note that the camera-receiver (or DCR with built-in receiver) relationship on wireless outdoor security camera systems have different specified ranges. Not all cameras have the same range. In fact wireless cameras may have a manufacturer’s specified range of from 30 feet to 2 miles Line Of Sight or LOS. LOS means a direct path in a straight line from camera to receiver that has no objects blocking the path. In other words, if you are standing at the point where the camera is mounted, you should be able to see the receiver (i.e. LOS).

Although the range is specified as LOS, it doesn’t necessarily mean that an impeding object along the path will prevent reception. In fact, seldom is the reception actually blocked by impeding objects; normally the range is just reduced. The reduction of the range is variable based on the transmission signal technology used and the material make up of the object(s) that fall within the LOS. Windows have less effect that walls or trees for example. This is not unusual as cordless telephones share this same sort of LOS range. Therefore, be certain the specified range of the camera satisfies your requirements before purchasing the camera or system.

Other than the need for replacing or recharging batteries, the cameras in a wireless outdoor security camera system or relatively maintenance free.

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Evaluations Of Camera Security Systems

Written By:
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

In this article we will talk about evaluations of camera security systems and what you need to do and know to perform your own evaluations of camera security systems.

Evaluation of camera security systems can be difficult to do comparatively because of subtle differences in manufacturers’ digital video systems; so when trying to determine what system type or component to purchase, consider performing your own needs assessment first. Then search for the equipment that satisfies those requirements. Finally, you can compare different manufacturers’ or vendors’ brand offerings and prices.

Let’s cover the basics of performing a needs assessment based on the technological capabilities of digital video camera security systems. In order to make things a little easier to compare, we’ll break up the system into its three component parts and consider each component separately.

A typical digital video camera security system consists of one or more digital video cameras, the Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor. We will confine our evaluations of camera security systems here to standalone systems only.

First, determine what you need to protect or monitor. A room, a building, land, property located outside or inside, a parking lot, people, shoppers, cash register or teller areas, etc. Once you know exactly what you need to record, you can move on to deciding how you will record it. This is where the expertise of a professional installer is particularly helpful. An experienced installer can assess your situation and determine the precise placement and minimum number of cameras needed to do the job.

Once you know how many cameras are required, you can begin to narrow your evaluations of camera security systems. Generally speaking, the maximum number of cameras in a system determines the type of DVR that you will need. Customary DVR camera configurations include four, eight, and sixteen potential cameras (Note: The number of cameras is also referred to as “channels” which is not to be confused with another use of the word “channels” that describes specific radio frequencies). If a system requires more than sixteen cameras additional DVRs are used to satisfy the need.

So let’s assume our system will require seven cameras. We now know we will need an 8 channel DVR, but we aren’t ready to select the DVR just yet. Now let’s go back to the cameras. Of our seven cameras we know that four will be used outside and three will be used inside.

Now you must ask yourself what kind of digital video monitoring do you need? Do you require full time (24/7) day and night, do you track or follow objects (cars and people for example), and is audio required, and so on. Once you know the exact requirements of the camera you can determine exactly what type of camera you will need.

Let’s assume we need four outdoor, wireless, night vision infrared digital color cameras with a motion detector. These cameras will also be battery operated. In addition, we’ll need three indoor cameras without any special functions. However, we do need to determine how we will mount these cameras so we know what type of camera we will need for each of the seven cameras (dome, bullet, or box type cameras).

In performing your evaluation of camera security systems for this set-up you will also need to purchase a four channel receiver unit (a receiver unit that can accept four camera inputs and receive each on a separate frequency). This unit will be attached to the DVR. Speaking of which, we can now return to the DVR to consider what to purchase.

We know we need an 8 channel DVR. Do you want to be able to record for long periods of time without erasing over pre-recorded monitoring? If so, you should consider a DVR with a large capacity hard drive. Do you want to make copies of files on DVDs/CDs or other media? Do you need the DVR to connect to the internet? These questions will help determine the type of DVR you require.

Finally, ask yourself what type of monitor you will need. Will the monitor be used for setting up the system and occasional use or will the monitor be watched the majority of the time? (Monitors used for setup can be very small; monitors that will be used frequently should be large enough to view all seven cameras clearly).

After considering what we need, we can now perform evaluations of camera security systems to determine the best prices and products for our application.

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