Posts Tagged ‘ security camera system’



Construction Surveillance

Written By:
Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

It’s not always easy to hire an agency to provide 24 hour 7 days a week construction surveillance.  However, the need still arises because construction locations are prime targets for vandalism and theft, especially at night when the work has stopped and no one else is around.

No one particular state or city is immune.  Although most plumbing systems installed to day are plastic, there still exists some new install using copper pipe.  As the price of copper continues to raise, so will the theft from these construction sites.  Electricians install pre-wired electrical service to the construction site (such as a house, a store, or an apartment building) during the day.  At night, burglars come and rip it out so that they may take it to a scrap metal business and sell it for its weight.

So what can you do to stop or at least deter construction area theft?  You could hire an on-site security company to patrol or guard the site all night long.  This isn’t cheap, and in some localities it may be all but impossible to do.  Security Camera King suggests using a digital video security camera system, tailor made for your particular construction surveillance.

Usually, when a burglar sees that someone is using digital video construction surveillance systems, that alone deters further vandalizing or criminalizing acts.  Yet sometimes things do happen even when the cameras are in plain site.

However, with today’s modern technology, you could actually set up a temporary digital video security and surveillance system to monitor your construction site.  During the day time working hours this provides great documentation for any mishaps that may lead to a workers compensation claim.  During the night time you could use a remote video monitoring service like Digital Security Guard that can alert you and the authorities the minute something is detected.

A typical construction surveillance system could include a wireless IP camera system, probably one of the quickest and easiest construction surveillance systems to install.   If you must leave expensive materials, tools, or machines at the site overnight place a camera so they are each in view.

You could also place the cameras in a perimeter configuration around the entire construction site, to help deter vandalism and thieves from even entering your construction area.  Constant monitoring of these cameras will automatically help you to determine if any unauthorized individuals are trying to gain unauthorized access to the site.

Security Camera King carries a wide variety of cameras and associated equipment for just about any job.  Box cameras are an industry standard but remember that they will require housings and mounts which you must purchase separately.

Bullet cameras are ideal for this situation as they are weatherproof and quite often contain night time Infrared modes.   In this mode they use near infrared light emitted from InfraRed Light Emitting Diodes or IR LEDs.  Humans cannot see this light but the camera sure can.

Even dome cameras can be used for construction surveillance.  Here we recommend that you consider the vandal resistant models.  They are made as indoor/outdoor cameras and also can come with IR modes.  In addition, a Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ camera can be mounted on each end of the cross member of a “T” shape pole and this is often all that is needed for construction surveillance.

Security Camera King also has DVR lockboxes that are weather proof that can be used on site and anchored in such a way as to make it too difficult for anyone to run off with.  If you choose to use a system that requires the DVR be on site than these will be very helpful in providing a place for your DVR (and other equipment for some of the bigger models), a secure and locked place.

Construction surveillance is a positive move any way you look at it.  Serving a dual purpose of accident monitoring during work hours and security and surveillance during non working times.

If you are interested in purchasing a digital security and surveillance system to use as a construction surveillance system and need any help designing, choosing equipment, installing, or setting it up please contact one of our security experts today.  They may be easily reached by on-line “Live Chat” or by telephone at 866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6PM EST.

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Multichannel Security Camera

Written By:
Monday, June 6th, 2011

A multichannel security camera usually refers to a wireless security camera that has more than one frequency that it can transmit its video (and audio for some) data over to a corresponding receiver.  The multichannel aspect is important to prevent cross talk, interference, or other reception problems.

Let’s begin our discussion with multichannel security cameras by reviewing how a “wired” digital video security system works.

The digital video camera is responsible for “capturing” the video image.  It does this by using one of two different photosensitive sensors.  One is called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and the other is called a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although they both work a little differently, they both produce the same end result; data that can be used to construct a digital video image.

Generally the CCD or CMOS sensor is only 1/4 to 1/3″ square.  When light focused from the lens strikes the surface of the sensor, it emits a small electrical charge that can be measured.  This is used to construct the digital video image, but first the data must pass through a specialized Integrated Circuit or IC chip called an analog-to-digital converter.  The data also passes through another IC chip called a Digital Signal Processor or DSP which refines and fortifies the quality of the image

After passing through these components, the digital video data is now ready to be sent to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR.  The signal is sent along a cable or wire; many different types may be used but the most common is RG59 coaxial cable.  Using the proper adaptors CAT5 cable is also used.  The key here is that the video transmission must be “shipped” over a cable from the camera to the DVR.

Once the data reaches the DVR additional DSP chips compile the data and create a digital video file which can be stored for later use or viewed in real time (live).  The DVR uses something called a CODEC which stands for COmpression/DECompression utility.  The CODEC shrinks the size of the file incredibly while maintaining a high degree of quality.  The CODEC also prepares the file for streaming over the Internet if this is an option.

A wireless digital video security system basically works the same way.  The difference is the multichannel security camera contains its own transmitter circuitry and antenna.  It uses radio waves instead of RG59 or other cable to send the video signal from the camera to the DVR; most of the time this done using a corresponding receiver unit that is plugged into the video input of the DVR.

This is analogous to a land line wireless home phone.  The hand set has its own transmitter/antenna and it sends and receives signals to the base unit (receiver).  However, because land line based wireless home phones are so popular, it could be very easy for someone in the surrounding neighborhood to be operating on the same frequency as your phone.  This can happen with digital video transmissions as well.

Therefore these cameras are equipped with a selector that can be moved to choose a variety of different radio frequencies, or in this case, “channels.”  This can be a confusing term for the novice digital video security enthusiast because the word “channel” is also used to mean number of cameras or other devices.

So a multichannel security camera is a digital video security camera that has more than one radio frequency that it can transmit over.  Generally, the more channels available the better.  For example if you have an 8 channel (camera) DVR the wireless cameras will need 8 separate radio frequencies (channels) to prevent interference.  Likewise, the receiver will require the same or you may be able to use one receiver per camera, which could get a bit tedious.

If this article has not shed some light on what a multichannel security camera is, please contact one of our security experts via 0n-line “Live Chat” or by telephone toll free at 866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9AM to 6 PM EST.  They will be happy to explain any additional information and help you with the design, installation, set up, and use of a Security Camera King multichannel security camera system.

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Internet Security Camera System

Written By:
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

Nothing has more “global” access in the digital video security camera industry than an Internet security camera system.  The outreach available for use and/or monitoring has been extended even further with the increased technology in cell phones, namely 3G and 4G broadband Internet access.  In the following article we’ll take a look at some Internet security camera systems and how they work.

First, let’s make sure we understand how a “non-Internet” security camera system works.   In this type of system, digital video security and surveillance cameras capture video footage and send the video data to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR.  The DVR stores the video on a hard disk drive (HDD) just like the HDD found in a personal computer.  In addition the DVR may also display the video in real-time (live) on one to many monitors for surveillance purposes.

The digital video camera is responsible for capturing a light image and transforming it into an electronic image.  It does this by using a lens to focus what can be a large field of vision onto a small electronic sensor which usually ranges in size from 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch square.

One of two different sensor chips is used for this purpose.  They are the Charged Coupled Device or CCD and the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS. When light strikes these sensors they emit electrical charges which can be measured and used to create a video image.  The data that is created by these chips is actually analog in form until it passes through an analog-to-digital converter chip.  Another highly specialized electronic chip called a Digital Signal Processor or DSP insures the integrity of the data and may make any corrections that are necessary.

At this point, the camera passes the digital data along to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR whose job is to record the data and store it as mentioned above.  It does this by compressing the file into a fraction of its original size but still managing to maintain a high quality.  It does this by using a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility.

An Internet security camera system is very similar to this type of system, however once the data becomes digital, it opens up a whole new world of possibilities, especially including the use of the Internet.  There are basically two types of Internet security camera systems.  One system consists of cameras that are Internet compatible also called Internet Protocol ready or IP ready.  The other system consists of a DVR that has its own Web server technology and is called IP ready as well.

IP ready cameras contain their own web server technology so that they maybe connected to the Internet.  Instead of sending their digital data directly to a DVR, they send their data via the Internet to anywhere there is a client that wants to access the information.  Generally these cameras use two CODECs at once.  Many of the cameras pass the information on to the DVR using the MJPEG CODEC while streaming the information via the Internet for live viewing using the latest CODEC H.264.

These cameras may direct their video via the Internet to a specific type of DVR that is designed for this purpose which is called a Network Video Recorder or NVR.  One of the advantages of this system is that multiple cameras in multiple locations can be recorded by the NVR.  These locations can be widespread, such as two or more commercial facilities that are located in two different cities.  An Internet security camera system of this type can lend itself to all sorts of networking possibilities.

Another type of Internet security camera system exists where the DVR is the IP ready device and it takes care of all Internet related inquiries.  In this system, the cameras are not IP ready and they send all of their digital data to the DVR.  The DVR then contains its own Web server technology and allows a client access to the system through the DVR.  All of Security Camera King’s featured DVRs have these feature built in to the DVR.

This internet security camera system records the video locally on the DVRs HDD, but it allows a user to control the DVR and in many instances, even the cameras (for example, PTZ movements) remotely.  As a matter of fact, these systems can ever be monitored and controlled using a smartphone and 3G or 4G Internet technology.

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Security Flood Light DVR Camera

Written By:
Thursday, January 20th, 2011

Nothing says “”Gotchya!” to a potential intruder, vandal, or burglar better than a security flood light DVR camera. Thanks to modern technological improvements these devices are an entire compact digital video security system. They can be used in both residential and commercial applications and can be extremely effective when placed in the proper location.

Not only does a security flood light DVR camera help to protect and prevent perpetrators from causing damage or breaking and entering, but it also offers positive deterrence. It’s already been proven by the law enforcement agencies in London, England and New York City that the mere presence of digital video cameras deters criminal activity.

However, the security flood light DVR camera takes it one step further. Not only does it record still digital photographs or digital video images of the intruder, but once the unit senses motion, it snaps on a powerful high wattage flood light illuminating the surrounding area and “spotlighting” the intruder as well.

In addition to protecting homes and businesses, these units are great for protecting other property as well. Boat docks with electricity, barns, storage areas, specific portions of land, back entrances of retail stores, and no-trespassing industrial areas as well can benefit from the protection of a security flood light DVR camera.

The units are relatively easy to install and use as well. Basically, all that is required for installation is to mount the unit, connect it to a standard residential type power line, and select the settings you desire. Then walk away and be confident that your security flood light DVR camera will protect you and/or your family, business, or property.

Before we provide some detail about the design and function of a standard security flood light DVR camera, let’s briefly describe a typical digital video security camera system and how it works.

Most standard digital video security camera systems contain one to several cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and perhaps a monitor. The cameras are mounted in various strategic locations and send their digital video data to the DVR unit by means of a digital video cable run from each camera to the unit, or wirelessly using radio signal transmitters and receivers.

The DVR unit, much like a highly specialized personal computer, contains a hard disk drive like those found in computers. The DVR unit processes the digital data and creates a digital video file that can be viewed live on a monitor and/or saved on the DVR for later use.

A security flood light DVR camera is basically a miniature version of the basic system without the monitor. The unit contains all the devices (sans the monitor) within one relatively small, compact fixture. The floodlight is usually a powerful 500 watt halogen flood lamp. These lights can project a powerful beam of light in a relatively wide field of vision.

Connected to the light, DVR, and the camera is an infrared motion detector. The motion detector, known as a PIR or Passive InfraRed sensor, can detect the infrared radiation emitted by the objects in its field of vision. When this “heat signature” changes greatly or rapidly, the sensor interprets this as motion. The sensor activates a relay that switches the security flood light, DVR, and camera on. Depending on the model, the entire unit switches off either after motion is no longer detected or specified time period after the initial “On” state.

When the camera is switched “on” it immediately begins capturing digital video images (or stills), with the flood light helping to provide a crisp, clear, bright picture. An on board processing chip saves the data either as digital photographs or digital video files to the DVR.

The DVR in this case is not a large hard disk drive, but usually consists of an SD card (Secured Digital card), a compact flash card, thumb drive or similar mini-portable memory device. All the user needs to do is remove the SD card, transfer the files to their personal computer and view, print, or make movies disks of the saved data.

Although a security flood light DVR camera cannot provide the extensive precise coverage of a full size standard digital video security system, it does offer an economical alternative and can be quite useful for specific situations. Contact our security experts via Live Chat or telephone if you have any addition questions or would like to make a purchase.

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Web Ready Security Camera System

Written By:
Monday, January 10th, 2011

If you need to be able to monitor your security and surveillance system cameras from just about anywhere in the world at any time, consider using a web ready security camera system. These systems use the internet as the vehicle for transmitting their data so anywhere there is broadband internet access, there is potential for monitoring your home or business security camera system.

A web ready security camera system is reasonably priced, easy to install, and easy to operate thanks to technological advancements in the electronics and computer fields over the past few years. It differs from a standalone digital video security camera system in that it utilizes the internet to transmit the signals, and a personal computer or Mac computer to monitor and store the digital video image files.

A standalone, non-web ready security camera system consists of one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder (DVR) with a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), and a monitor. The digital video camera captures the reflective light from objects and transposes these light images into electronic images. The camera normally has an on-board analog-to-digital processing chip that changes the electronic information into pure digital or binary form.

A video transmission cable, usually an RG-59 coaxial cable, must be run from each camera to the DVR unit. The signals from the cameras travel through this cable to the DVR unit where the DSP compiles them into a digital video file. Digital video files can be extremely large in size so the DSP uses a COmpression/DECompression (CODEC) utility to shrink the size of the file without sacrificing a large amount of quality. After the digital video file is created it can be viewed live on a monitor or stored on the DVR’s Hard Disk Drive (HDD) for later use.

A web ready security camera system produces the same sort of final results but goes about doing it in a different way. First a web ready security camera system has either IP (Internet Protocol ready) cameras or an IP DVR or an IP server. If the system uses IP ready cameras, each camera has its own built in web server technology that is used for the Internet. The camera connects to the internet either via a Cat 5 Ethernet wire or wirelessly using a corresponding wireless modem or router.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP DVR, then normal cameras are connected to the DVR and the system works like a typical standalone system. Except that the DVR (and therefore the digital video files and camera controls) can be controlled remotely via the internet and some other end-user device.

If the web ready security camera system uses an IP server, it may be able to digitize older analog based cameras and send them over the Internet or it may simply combine the signals of several newer digital cameras and send them over the Internet. In either case, the digital video file must be sent over the internet to a connected computer that can act as a storage and monitor device or to some other web-compatible monitoring device such as an iPhone, iPad, 3G and 4G smartphones and other similar devices. (Note that if the signal is received by another DVR or personal computer, the system does not have a device to save digital video files to and therefore can only be used to monitor the cameras in real-time).

Probably the most profound advantage of web ready security camera systems is the incredibly almost infinite geographic locations in the world where the system can be monitored and operated. Theoretically, anywhere there is broadband Internet accessibility; the system can be monitored and controlled.

Perhaps the biggest disadvantage to these types of systems is that since they are connected to the internet, a very public domain, they may be susceptible to hacker intervention and even computer viruses.

All in all, there is nothing that can provide you with such extensive capability to monitor and control your system remotely than a web ready security camera system. If you need more information or would like to purchase a web ready security camera system, please contact one of Security Camera King’s security experts today either via live chat or telephone.

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