Posts Tagged ‘ Security Camera Systems’



DVR Security System Cameras

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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DVR Security Camera systems

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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Video Security Systems

Written By:
Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

Video security systems are fast becoming the “wave” of the future.  Not only can they document events as they occur, but with Internet technology and other electronic technology advancements, they can even act as burglar alarms and alert you when possible illegal events occur.

A basic digital video security system is a component system that consists of three major components:

1)    One to many cameras;

2)    A DVR or Digital Video Recorder; and,

3)    A monitor or monitors

The system operates in the following manner.  The digital video camera converts light energy into electrical energy which can be measured and is used to create digital video data.  This data is sent to the DVR.  As previously mentioned, the DVR is a digital video recorder, just like the hard disk drive or HDD of a personal computer.  However, in security camera systems, the DVR normally contains a processor, just like the processor in a Personal Computer or PC.

However, the processor in a DVR is a highly specialized piece of electronic circuitry.  Unlike the PC processor, the security camera DVR processor is manufactured to handle specific functions of security camera systems such as digital video file production, camera control, and recording of digital video files.  It uses a specific utility called a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC program to process the digital video file from the digital video data sent to it by the video camera.

Digital video is basically nothing more than a series of rapid digital photographs taken in rapid succession.  Typically, high quality digital video is about 30 digital photographs taken within on second, also referred to as 30 frames per second or 30 fps.  When you think of the file size from just one high quality digital photograph, you can imagine how enormous a digital video file that takes 30 fps for 24 hours could be.

That’s why the DVR’s processor uses a CODEC to create the digital video file.  It uses special programming that shrinks the size of the file without sacrificing the high quality of the image.  CODECS change from time to time as different approaches and technologies make each CODEC better and more efficient.  One of the most popular and recent CODECs is called the H.264 CODEC.

The DVR in a video security system creates, processes, and stores digital video files that can be viewed instantly (live) on monitors or stored for later viewing on monitors or for archiving.  Many DVRs also have additional storage options such as CD/DVD writers or USB Flash drive connectivity to copy portions of video to portable media.  This may be necessary to give insurance companies, police departments, as evidence, etc.

The DVR may also contain other specialized features.  One common feature of many modern DVRs is internet connectivity.  The DVR may contain its own web server technology and programming so that it may be connected to any broadband internet service and instantly become accessible anywhere in the world there is broadband internet accessibility.

Most DVR and security camera systems come in 4, 8, or 16 channels.  This means that the DVR can handle 4, 8, or 16 separate camera inputs at one time.  Security systems requiring more than 16 cameras simply use additional DVRs to expand the number of cameras needed.

Highly specialized security cameras may have highly specialized DVRs.  Portable systems, systems that are used for a small amount of time, systems that have self contained cameras and DVRs all in one unit may utilize different digital storage methods for the DVR.  For example school bus DVR and security camera systems often use a Compact Flash Card or similar portable storage medium instead of a full sized hard disk drive as the DVR.

Is a DVR necessary in a security camera system?  No, not necessarily, but a system with just a monitor and no DVR will not be able to record the video so that it may be reproduced for later use.  A baby monitor is usually a good example of this.  On the other hand, a retail store facility would not realize the full potential of protection without a DVR and security camera system.

Other DVR and video security systems’ functions pertaining to the DVR may include audio recording, various output display resolutions as well as connectors, remote control, e-mail and smartphone notification, and mouse and/or keyboard control.

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PWR-Mini-4 Output Switching Supply

Written By:
Thursday, March 24th, 2011

There are many options for providing power to your digital video camera security system and Security Camera King’s (SCK) PWR-MINI-4 Output Switching Supply is an excellent choice.  In this article, we’ll take a loot at some of the issues related to powering your digital video security camera systems and examine the solutions that SCK has to offer.

Let’s start from the beginning.  A typical digital video camera security system consists of cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor. Not always, but often the monitor is located very near the DVR.  Most monitors and DVRs operate from 120 Volt Alternating Current (AC) power.  Assuming the monitor is located in close proximity to the DVR, providing a power supply for these two components is relatively easy.  Since they both plug into an ordinary AC power outlet a surge suppressor or power strip would easily serve their needs.

The cameras, however, are a different story.  Most of the digital video cameras today do not operate directly from household current; there power demand is simply just not that high.  That’s why a device like the PWR-MINI-4 output switching supply is needed.  In fact, most digital video security cameras today usually operate on either 24 Volt AC or 12 Volt Direct Current (DC) power.

So the problem is how do you get the correct power supply demands to each camera scattered all over a property and perhaps outside as well?

The worst case scenario for this is providing each camera with a single plug-in power supply.   This however, can be too restrictive as it may not be practical to expect to find an outdoor power outlet fixed to the pole that your driveway camera is mounted.  Not only that, but before you know it things could get just a might bit complicated in the power supply department if you have a 32 camera Elite system and each camera has its own separate plug-in power supply.

Battery operated cameras are fine and some may last a relatively long time between battery changes or recharge periods.  But once again, if that parking lot camera is located on top of a 25 foot pole, who wants to climb it every other day, just to change the batteries?

There’s got to be a better solution, and there is and of course SCK has taken care of that for you.  Since each camera must have a video transmission cable (usually RG-59) run from the DVR to the camera, why not bundle the power line with the RG-59?  However, in order to do this, one would need a centrally located power supply, preferably in close proximity to the DVR since the power leads will terminate in this area with the RG-59 cable.  What’s the solution?  In enters the PWR-Mini-4 Output Switching Supply.  Of course this is not the only solution, but it certainly is one that works.

You’ll note that the PWR-Mini-4 Output Switching Supply comes with SCK’s complete packaged systems with precut-and-connector terminated cables.   This design makes installation even easier since the user (or installer) is not required to cut cable and apply connecters.  All that is needed is for the power cable’s 2.5 mm female power plug to be attached to the power supply’s 2.5 mm male power plug.

For bulk cable packaged systems, SCK offers their model number PWR-4 power distribution box instead.  There is just a little bit more time and effort involved in these installations because the cables need to be cut and connectors need to be fitted.  However, this provides you, the user, with a more custom designed system.

Cables can be cut to exact lengths and runs over 100 feet can easily be dealt with.  All that needs to be done is to attach the 2.5 mm female plug power leads to the camera end of the cable and screw the two wires down to screw terminals for each camera in the power distribution box.

The key here is to use the right power supply for the job.  Too little power and the camera won’t work;  too much power and you could turn that $200 piece of highly complicated technical electronics into one solid melted blob.  That’s why the PWR-Mini-4 Output Switching Supply is so important.

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Video Security Camera Systems

Written By:
Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Nothing can provide better protection than video security camera systems.  Today’s systems can be “tailor built” to suit every individual need and with Internet availability you can have absolute control almost anywhere you go.  Security Camera King features several different video security camera systems in our on-line catalog of security equipment.

In the not to distant past, video security camera systems were tools that only a commercial or industrial business or a very wealthy household could afford.  That is no longer true, thanks to incredibly reduced prices, mostly attributed to the “digital revolution.”  As computer and electronic technology advances, components become smaller, more powerful, and less costly.  This holds true for the digital video security system industry as well.

In fact, not only have video security camera systems become smaller, more powerful, and less costly, but the components themselves are becoming like self contained mini-units which makes installation incredibly easy.  For most systems all that is needed is to mount the cameras and power supply, run the cables, and set up the Digital Video Recorder or DVR.  It has become so easy that you can install most complete systems as a do-it-yourself project in one weekend or less.

A standard video security camera system today consists of digital video cameras and a DVR.  Of course, many users prefer to use a full-time monitor to display the cameras’ images, but it is only truly necessary to set up the system.  After that, the monitor can be removed and the system can continue to operate with the settings you have chosen.

The operation of video security camera systems is pretty straight forward too.  The camera’s main function is to capture video (and audio if so equipped) and send it to the DVR.  The DVR stores the video and makes it available for viewing.  The monitor provides the means of output for the system; it displays the cameras’ captured video.

Are video security systems really that simple?  Well yes and no, but thanks to digital technology, the units can be constructed in such a way that the user doesn’t really need to concern himself or herself with the actual mechanism of function; they just need to make sure everything is placed (mounted) in the proper locations to make the system work.  The following is a closer look at how the video security camera system works.

We’ll begin with the digital video camera.  Inside each digital video camera is a sensor that can change light energy into measurable impulses of electricity.  There are two different sensors that function in two entirely different ways, yet produce the same end result, electronic video data.  The sensors are called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.

After the sensor converts the light energy into electrical energy, that energy is sent through a series of on-board Integrated Circuit (IC) chips that interpret the electrical impulses.  These may include Digital Signal Processors or DSPs and analog-to-digital converter processors.  Once the data is prepared and digitized it is ready to leave the camera and travel to the DVR.

The DVR receives the digital video from the camera but it is in “raw” form, meaning it has not received fine tuning adjustments or the proper compilation of the data to create a digital video file.   The DVR has its own DSP and central processor that immediately begin to work on the data sent by the cameras.

The cameras’ data is analyzed and any fine tuning adjustments are made by the DVR.  Next, the DVR employs a COmpression/DECompression (CODEC) utility that has one specific purpose; the CODEC reduces the video image file to a fraction of the original size while maintaining a minimal loss of quality.

There are many different types of CODECs.  As technology improves, a newer CODEC is eventually produced, “out shrinking” digital video files as compared to the previous CODEC.  Security Camera King’s video security camera systems all use the latest and most efficient CODEC called “H.264.”  It provides maximum file reduction while maintaining video quality as much as possible.

After compressing the data the DVR creates a digital video file and saves it on its hard disk drive.  In addition, the DVR makes the file immediately available for viewing on a monitor.

If you are interested in purchasing a video security camera system, check out our on-line catalog or contact us by “Live Chat” or telephone and speak to one of our security experts today.

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