Posts Tagged ‘ Security Surveillance’



Basic Port Forwarding for the DVR & NVR

Written By:
Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

security system support groupsToday we will be exploring a simple world of port forwarding. For those of you who like to be hands on and grasp the “What, Why, and How to do” or you simply want to complete this segment of your job or project and Tech Support is unavailable I welcome you to proceed reading. I will begin with, “Make sure you have a PC, DVR/NVR, router and/or modem all [plugged in and ready to go. Also please obtain all passwords to each device (if necessary) to ensure flawless setup as we go from procedure to procedure. Once you have done so please access your START MENU on your PC.

basic port forwarding for nvrs

{Depending on what operating system you have, the above picture may vary.)

Choose the RUN option and then type in the command CMD. Then hit the enter key and you should have a window like the following:

setting up your security system

In this window, type in the command IPCONFIG and hit the enter key, this will pull up your LAN (Local Area Network) IP scheme. The one you will see my network in is a 192.168.1.xxx scheme. If yours is different, PLEASE DO NOT DESPAIR**, following along with the same process while subsitutuing my scheme with yours, will provide you with the SAME results. You should have now the following window:

As you see in the picture above my gateway 192.168.1.1 (which is my network scheme). The IP address of the PC I am using is 192.168.1.104. This is the unique IP belonging only to my device (my computer). This is the name, if you will, that the LAN knows my PC as. Every device that is attached to my network is issued its own unique IP address. Now our DVR/NVR and IP Mega Pixel cameras all have a default IP address of 192.168.1.108. On my network 192.168.1.108 is already taken so I will establish the IP of the DVR to 192.168.1.120. I suggest anyhow, to always change the IP address of any our devices to a known open IP on your network. You can see if an IP is open or not by pinging your network. You can check this in Command Prompt by typing in PING (hit the space bar once) and then the desired IP based on your established scheme. It will look like so:

how to manage your security system

(Above you can see this IP address is assigned to another device due to the com packet replies)

(Above you can see the IP address is not in use)

Now that we have established an open IP to assign to the device lets change it. If you right click on the mouse of the DVR, chose the following:

Main Menu -> Settings -> Network. Configure your network to the chosen IP in the IP address field. Make sure to change the Default Gateway in the respected field as well if your network requires. While we are still in this menu, let’s go ahead and assign our desired ports for the HTTP and TCP. I for instance will change the HTTP to 88 and keep the TCP port as it defaults of 37777. I now will save my configuration. (If the DVR prompts you that it wants to reboot, this is fine and a necessary function. Just hit okay.) Now let’s move onto creating PORT FOWARDING rules on our network. Normally you can just open up any browser and type in the DEFAULT GATEWAY of your IP scheme. Please refer to the picture below:

how to set up port forwarding for NVRs

(Before)

port forwarding set up for security systems

(After)

I will now access my router by putting in the password. Once Inside I can now create port forwarding rules for my device. Based on your router and/or modem the following pictures will not look the same. The current router I am using is a Linksys 1750AC.

(Main Menu once you log into the Linksys 1750AC)
single port forwarding for security cameras

I will now go to the Security tab at the bottom left hand corner, then choose the APPS & GAMING tab, and then SINGLE PORT FORWARDING.

double port forwarding for security systemsecurity system set up

As you can see in the above I have created (3) different port forwarding rules for the IP address 192.168.1.120 which is my DVR. You WILL have to only create two, the HTTP PORT & TCP PORT. Once completed be sure to save the configuration and now let’s check to see if our external is now connected to our internal with this two ports. We are going to proceed use a website known as: CanYouSeeMe.org

security system port forwarding support

Once on this page proceed to enter in the HTTP & TCP ports you assigned to your device and opened on your LAN in the box like so:

security camera help forum

I hope you got the same results as I did! If all was successful you ports should have shown a SUCCESS: I can see your service on (your external IP here) on port (your desired port you choose). If not, again do not despair***, please try following the same process over or contact us for your free technical support on OUR products. Please see the below for the DVR view on a browser:

best security camera system support

best security system help

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Multicam Surveillance

Written By:
Friday, November 18th, 2011

A security multicam surveillance system can provide the security and peace of mind for most residential or commercial applications.  Huge selections in camera types, video recording technologies and monitoring options have made digital video camera systems the ideal choice for security and surveillance monitoring.

Exactly what is a multicam surveillance and security standalone system?  A multicam surveillance system usually consists of the following components:

  • More than one digital video camera
  • A processor/capture board/and CODEC application
  • A digital video recorder or DVR, and;
  • A monitor if desired

Multicam surveillance cameras for security standalone DVR (Digital Video Recorder) systems are manufactured in two basic types, indoor and outdoor.  Outdoor cameras are usually “weatherproof” meaning they are able to withstand environmental weather conditions like rain, snow, and heat.  Indoor cameras are designed for used in covered environments and do not usually contain the same type of camera enclosure that provides protection from the elements.

Both indoor and outdoor multicam surveillance digital video camera DVR systems can be wired or wireless.  A wireless camera does not require an image transmitting cable to be connected from the camera to the processing unit.  Instead, these cameras transmit their data via built-in antennae to receiver units that are usually located near the processor, DVR, and monitor.  Wireless camera units usually transmit their data on the 2.4 or 5.8 MHz radio band and can provide fairly long line of sight ranges for transmission.

Whether the cameras are indoor/outdoor and wired/wireless they can also be day/night vision or infrared (IR) night vision cameras.

Digital video cameras produce a video image by using one of two different types of electronic sensors, both of which can produce color or black and white video.  Charged Coupled Devices or CCDs and Complimentary Metal-Oxide Semiconductors or CMOSs convert captured light into electrical energy that can be used to create high quality video images.  CCDs and CMOSs can be very sensitive light and create high quality video in very low light conditions, utilizing as little light that is available on moonlit nights for example.  Cameras that use these sensors are usually referred to as day/night vision cameras and although they can operate in very low light condition, some visible light must be available to produce a video image.

There are digital video cameras that can operate in conditions of total darkness.  These cameras are normally called night vision cameras and operate by creating video images from infrared or IR light.  CCDs have the inherent ability to detect IR radiation light which is invisible to the human eye.  A digital video camera for home security standalone dvr system can take advantage of this characteristic by “bathing” the target area with IR light.  Since the light is invisible to the human eye, we cannot see or detect the presence of the IR light.  IR Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs are used to produce the IR light for this purpose.  IR LEDs are placed around the camera lens so they are aimed at the same target area as the camera and illuminate the area to record IR video.  IR images are monochromatic or black and white.

The multicam surveillance and security standalone DVR system is a security camera system that does not require any additional equipment, such as a personal computer to operate.  The cameras transmit their data to a processor or capture device that converts the electronic information sent into a digital video file that can be watched on a monitor and stored on a DVR.  Often COmpression/DECompression (CODEC) programs or wired circuits are used to reduce the size of the digital file while maintaining high quality video images.  This provides for easy storage and portability of the file, allowing large amounts of data to be stored.

The DVR of a multicam surveillance and security standalone DVR system is much like the hard drive on a personal computer.  It is a magnetic storage disk or plate that stores the video in digital file format for later viewing or archival purposes.  Files can even be copied to other mediums and viewed on personal computers or DVD players.

Multicam surveillance security systems can be used to for a variety of applications.  They are great for providing perimeter coverage of a business building or residence for security and surveillance purposes.  They can also be used inside the home or office to detect and recorded unwanted intruders.  In addition they can be used as bay room monitors, nanny monitors, and pet monitors.

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IP Cameras Security Surveillance

Written By:
Friday, January 7th, 2011

One of the ever increasing most popular digital video camera security systems is the IP cameras security surveillance. This camera system is unique in that it utilizes the internet as a medium for sending video images and remotely controlling the camera making accessibility nearly ubiquitous throughout the world.

There are a few variations on the theme on how these cameras and/or camera security systems operate, but the end product is the same. A digital video file that can be viewed virtually anywhere there is broadband internet access and stored on a personal computer’s hard drive for later use or archiving.

Let’s take a quick look at an average standalone digital video security camera system and how it works so we can better understand how IP cameras security surveillance systems work. A standalone system is so named because it can be used by itself without any additional outside equipment (i.e. other than the standard system equipment, no additional PC or other device for example is required).

A typical standalone digital video security system contains one or more digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR with a Digital Signal Processor or DSP, and a monitor. The digital video cameras in these systems capture light images and transform them into electronic video images. The camera normally contains an analog-to-digital processor chip that sends the video image data in binary or digital form to the DVR unit.

The DVR unit consists of three primary types of devices; the Hard Disk Drive (HDD), the DSP previously mentioned, and any additional peripheral type devices such as CD or DVD recorders to make portable copies of video files. The digital signal comes from the camera via an RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable to the DVR unit. Each individual camera must have its own cable run from the camera to the DVR unit.

When the data reached the DVR unit the DSP processes the data, applies a COmpression/DECompression utility (or CODEC) that greatly compacts the information and reduces the final size of the digital video file. The digital video files is then viewed on a monitor (live) and/or saved to the HDD for later use.

IP cameras security surveillance systems differ in that they normally connect to the Internet instead of using a video transmission cable to relay the camera data to the DVR unit. Furthermore, IP (which stands for Internet Protocol ready) cameras do this normally by one of two methods; either the data is sent via a Cat 5 Ethernet cable to a router or modem or wirelessly to a wireless router or wireless modem.

Using the internet, especially the wireless technology, creates a great advantage for this system. Once the signal make it to an Internet connection the cameras can be viewed and/or controlled from anywhere in the world that broadband internet is accessible. This includes working in tandem with devices such as a Personal Computer or Mac Computer, iPhones, iPads and the like, and many 3G and 4G smartphones. Literally, you can see what is going on at home in Miami when you are on business travel in Paris.

Another advantage of the IP cameras security surveillance system is the ability to use wireless internet technology. This eliminates the need to run the RG-59 coaxial cable from each camera to the DVR unit, greatly reducing installation time and making the process a do-it-yourself project that is a snap.

IP cameras used for security surveillance are able to work by processing the video signal on board and sending it via the camera’s on board web server technology. A variation on this theme is the IP DVR. In this instance the standard cameras are used in conjunction with the DVR but the DVR has the IP capability and is connected to a router or modem. The files are stored on the DVR units HDD but are accessible via the internet to the user.

On the receiving end of an IP camera security surveillance system that uses a personal computer the digital video files are stored on the computer’s HDD and viewed on the computer’s monitor. Normally this systems work in tandem with common internet browsers such as Internet Explorer, Safari, etc. Installation setup normally consists of a self installing software CD so for many systems no prior computer networking knowledge is needed.

Security Camera King has a full line of digital video security systems. Contact one of our experts today if you are interested in purchasing an IP cameras security surveillance system.

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Outdoor Security Surveillance Cameras

Written By:
Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

Boats, barns, house perimeters, land tracts, construction sites, parking lots, and automobiles are just some of the property you may need to protect with outdoor security surveillance cameras. Although all digital video cameras are not made the same, there are some unique features that make outdoor security surveillance cameras versatile in application.

Outdoor security surveillance cameras are made especially for use outdoors in stand-alone situations where they may be exposed to the weather and other elements. In fact, many outdoor security surveillance cameras are rated by their manufacturer with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Ingress Protection (IP) code. An IP code gives the user a definitive rating of what type of conditions the camera is rated for

Most outdoor security surveillance cameras are the same as an indoor model but are protected by being placed in some sort of enclosure. This enclosure protects the camera from substances that could damage it like water or dust. EIC IP rating provides a descriptive assessment of the protection. The code consists of 2 digits; the first digit represents protection from solid matter and the second digit represents protection from liquid matter.

Both IP code digits have different ranges. For the first digit, the range is from 0 to 6 with lower values representing large sized objects and a rating of 6 meaning absolutely dust tight. Many outdoor surveillance cameras are rated a 6 or 5. A 5 rating means the dust is not entirely prevented from entering but the dust that does enter is not enough to cause interference with the operation of the camera.

The second digit ranges from 0 to 8. A rating of zero means there is no protection while a rating of 8 means the camera can be immersed in water deeper than 1 meter continuously. Most outdoor security surveillance cameras are rated 5 (water projected at the camera from a nozzle in any direction shall not have a harmful effect) or 6 (water projected at the camera from a powerful jet in any direction shall not have a harmful effect. A good IP rating for outdoor security surveillance cameras is IP55, IP56, IP65, or IP66.

Outdoor security surveillance cameras have a wide variety of extra features so that a camera can be purchased to satisfy a specific need. Actually, a multiple camera system doesn’t have to have all the cameras the same. Each camera can have different features to suit the condition, yet all can easily work in unison on one system.

The following is just a partial list of some of the optional features available on outdoor security surveillance cameras:

  • Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) function. These cameras can move horizontally or vertically to greatly increase the total field of view area of the camera. They have a telephoto lens that can enlarge the view as well. These cameras can be used with Digital Video Recorder (DVR) software that can automatically track or follow a moving object.
  • Day/Night vision or Day/Infrared night vision cameras. Day/night vision cameras are incredibly sensitive to light and can require very little light to produce a high quality color video. Some cameras can produce video in lighting conditions equivalent to that of a clear, moonless night. Other cameras make use of infrared radiation in the near infrared spectrum to illuminate their field of view. These cameras usually use infrared Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) to illuminate their target areas. Human eyes cannot detect this infrared light so it is invisible to us in the dark. When operating in this mode these cameras produce high quality black and white or monochromatic video as there are no “colors” associated with infrared illumination.
  • Wireless technology cameras. These cameras have their own built in transmitter and antenna that send the video signal to a corresponding receiver (or DVR with a built in receiver). This eliminates the need for running a video transmission cable for each camera to the DVR. These cameras can also be battery operated allowing them to be mounted almost anywhere.
  • Internet Protocol (IP) ready cameras. These cameras can be connected to a broadband internet connection and be both controlled and monitored in a remote location anywhere in the world that there is internet accessibility (this includes 3G and 4G smartphones as well).

It’s pretty easy to see the versatility of outdoor security surveillance cameras, and the above list doesn’t even contain all the features that are available. For example, Security Camera King even offers explosion proof outdoor security surveillance cameras.

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Deck Security Systems

Written By:
Monday, September 27th, 2010

If you own a boat or a yacht then a deck security system is a small investment that can yield large returns in the area of security and surveillance. In addition, a deck security system offers you the peace of mind of knowing that your craft or vessel is safe and sound.

There are many types of digital video security systems that are suitable for use on your boat’s deck. If your boat is docked at a slip that provides electrical power, or your yacht has its own on-board generator, then there is an even greater selection of security systems available for use.

Let’s consider these deck security systems as two different categories. One type requires external electrical power supply either in the form of typical house current or as DC (Direct Current) supplied by the boat’s battery and the other contains its own self-sustainable on-board power supply. We’ll discuss the latter type first.

There are many different types of digital video security camera systems that can function by using rechargeable batteries. These systems are usually an “all-in-one” type system where the camera and Digital Video Recorder are all one unit. These deck security systems are usually suited for smaller craft, where one camera can satisfactorily cover the target area for security surveillance. In addition to creating digital video files these cameras often are capable of taking digital still photographs as well.

These systems usually contain an infrared (called a PIR) sensor. The sensor acts as a switch to turn the camera on and off when movement is detected. This motion detection switching conserves the power supply so that only a small amount of electricity is needed to maintain the unit when there is no activity.

In addition, the Digital Video Recorder or DVR is normally some sort of flash drive that saves the digital video or still photographs to removable flash media such as a Smartcard, Flash drive, etc. Since the DVR uses flash media, these units have the advantage of being able to remove the storage media and view any recorded data on another device, such as a personal computer for example. The disadvantage with these units is that the flash drives have relatively small storage capacities (for example 2 to 8 Gigabytes) so recording time is limited compared to a typical DVR unit that may have hundreds of Gigabytes of storage. Nonetheless these units are still powerful security devices that can provide high quality images of any one trespassing or tampering with your boat.

Another type of deck security system that is similar to this system uses the boat’s DC current for power. These systems should also be motion activated to conserve energy usage. These units normally run off of 12 volts of DC current so they may possibly be powered by your boat’s battery or by an extra battery carried on board the boat dedicated specifically to the security system. These deck security systems may employ the Flash drive type DVR or may even contain a mini-hard disk drive DVR to record images.

Finally, for slips that provide external electrical power or for ships that contain their own on-board 110 volt AC (Alternating Current) power, standard digital video security systems can be used as deck security systems. These security surveillance system cameras can be mounted either on the deck of the boat or on supportive surfaces of the dock/gangway.

There are several different types of systems that may be used in these cases depending on the resources available, location of the dock, etc. For example, wireless digital video cameras can be used that transmit their video data to a corresponding receiver inside the home or marina. If the home or marina has broadband internet access, these systems can be easily networked using the internet so that the owner can monitor the boat area anywhere in the world there is internet access. This includes using 3G or 4G cellular smart phones to view the target area.

Depending on the equipment used, these deck security systems may be able to store up to four weeks or more of continuous video monitoring. These systems can also include audio recording, motion detection, and many other features as well.

Regardless of the deck security system you choose, make sure the camera(s) are designed for outdoor use so they are protected from the elements, especially water. Cameras used for this purpose should have an Ingress Protection (IP) rating of at least IP65.

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