March 5, 2012

Fake Security Cameras

Fake security cameras make great tools that can be used to fill in "gaps" between real digital video cameras in a digital video security system. Used as a standalone item, fake security cameras can also be a less expensive alternative to the real thing. Security Camera King carries professional-looking fake security cameras that can help you complete a camera array in a real system or simulate a real system without the full expense.
November 18, 2011

Multicam Surveillance

A security multicam surveillance system can provide the security and peace of mind for most residential or commercial applications. Huge selections in camera types, video recording technologies and monitoring options have made digital video camera systems the ideal choice for security and surveillance monitoring.
July 11, 2011

Surveillance Camera Lens

Surveillance camera lens are slowly beginning to evolve with the technology that supports them. Before the digital age, a good majority of the surveillance cameras required that a lens be purchased for each camera. Presently, some cameras still work that way, but the vast majority has the lens built right into the camera. These lenses are often referred to as "board lenses."
March 22, 2011

CCTV Systems

The phrase CCTV systems can cover a broad range of different video camera systems. Generally speaking, when we think of a CCTV system, we are usually referring to a video monitoring, surveillance, and/or security system. CCTV is an acronym for Closed Circuit TeleVision however, more often then not in today's age of technology, these systems are often called digital video security and surveillance systems.
March 21, 2011

Video Surveillance Cameras

Electronic video images may show a varying degree of detail. That is evidenced by the contrast between standard television broadcasts and those called High Definition (HD). Television was originally displayed on a Cathode Ray Tube or CRT (also called the "picture tube"). The CRT reproduced the image on its screen by shooting an electron beam horizontally at the rate of about 60 times per second. To a large degree, the number of horizontal lines determined how detailed the video appeared. The more lines, the smaller the lines, the greater the detail of the picture.