Posts Tagged ‘ ultimate series’



DVR Security System Cameras

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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DVR Security Camera systems

Written By:
Friday, May 6th, 2011

Today’s Digital Video Recorder or DVR security camera systems are an amazing bundle of new high quality technology.  The security camera industry can also thank the personal computer industry as a contributor, because a lot of today’s DVR security camera systems use recently invented technology borrowed from the computer industry.

In this article we are going to describe how a typical DVR security camera system works.

Modern digital video security and surveillance systems are basically component systems.  This means that essentially, the parts of the system are like plug n play items used in computers.  All of the components do not have to be made by one manufacturer, they can differ in function and still work on the system, and they can usually be removed and replaced with something else and the system will continue to work.

This provides tremendous versatility in application because the DVR security camera systems are no longer required to use all of the same components.  For example, an 8 channel system may have 6 bullet cameras and 2 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera made by a totally different manufacturer.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how a DVR security camera system (and its individual components) works.  The first component of the system is the camera.  There are so many different type of cameras available today that we do not have the space for this article to cover them all.  Instead, let look at how they work

DVR security cameras possess one primary function; transfer the reflecting light that is in its field of vision into electrical impulses that can be measured, manipulated, and compiled to create a digital video file.  This information is then sent to the DVR and/or monitor for processing and viewing.

The camera does this by using one of two different electronic sensor chips called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  Although both sensors work a little differently, the both yield the same end product–the electrical data that can be used to create a digital video file.

This is accomplished by the camera’s lens focusing the field of view onto one of these chips, which generally range from only 1/4″ to 1/2″ square.  When the light strikes the sensor chip, small electrical impulses are created by the pixels in the chip.  Each one can be measured and used to create the data that will be used to display the cameras field of view as a digital video.

At this point the signal is still an analog type signal.  The camera sends this analog data through an analog-to-digital processor chip to convert the data into digital or binary format.  The camera also contains a Digital Signal Processor or DSP chip that is used to make fine adjustments to the data.  Once the digital information is ready it is sent via a video transmission cable or other means to the DVR, hence the name DVR security camera systems.

Once the signal reaches the DVR, it applies its own DSP technology along with a CODEC utility.  Codec is an acronym for COmpression/DECompression.  This utility program uses a special algorithm program that reduces the incredibly large file into just a fraction of its original size without sacrificing significant quality.  Once this is accomplished the digital video file is compiled and is saved on the DVR’s hard disk drive and/or displayed on a system monitor.

It should be easy to see now why DVR security camera systems benefit from technological improvement in the computer world.  Many PC based devices are used in security camera systems.  For example, the DVR saves the digital video file to its hard disk drive for storage.  USB Thumb drives can be used to update firmware and copy and transfer video footage.  DSP and memory chips are directly related to the computer industry.

Even the monitors used today are basically the same as computer monitors but they may include a few extra input options.  Monitors have gone from the bulky Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) type to the LCD type just like most computer monitors.

Security Camera King offers a wide selection of DVR security camera systems with everything you need to install it but the tools.  Try one of our systems, the Elite Mini Economy, the Elite Mini HD, the Elite Series, or the Ultimate Series and see for yourself.  The majority of our cameras come with a 1 year full warranty (some models have 2 years) and our DVRS have a 3 year warranty.

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PTZ Security Cameras

Written By:
Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ security cameras can really extend the field of view of an otherwise stationary camera.  There are a variety of PTZ security cameras that can perform many functions in addition to PTZ perhaps making this camera the most versatile in application of all the different types of security cameras.   Security Camera King has a large selection of only the highest quality PTZ security cameras in the business.

A horizontal movement of a camera’s field of view (or direction of aim) is called a “Pan.”  Likewise, vertical movement of a camera’s field of view is called “Tilt.”  Using combinations of telephoto lens moving in and out to enlarge or shrink the field of view or magnify specific objects within the field of view is called “Zooming.”  A PTZ camera of course, can do all three of these actions.

Several years ago, a PTZ security camera was incredibly expensive; especially if it was the older analog type camera.  These cameras were often bullet or box type cameras that were mounted on electric motor operated pedestals to produce the movements necessary to pan or tilt.  They were often awkward, bulky, and bumpy in their movement.

Today’s modern digital video PTZ cameras are very light weight and move with incredible precision and fluidity.  They are much cheaper than their analog ancestors thanks to modern technological improvements in both electronic circuitry and mechanical design.  The majority of PTZ cameras on the market today are the dome type camera.  They can be mounted on the ceiling or on the wall using horizontal mounting brackets.

Regardless of whether the camera is mounted on the ceiling or the wall, the camera itself is oriented in a position that always puts the camera dome opposite the floor or ground.  In this position, the camera has the advantage of being able to pan around in a circle of 360 degrees and tilt in a full semi-sphere of 180 degrees or more.  If possible a ceiling mount or side mount on a pole is more desirable than a wall mount because providing there are no additional objects blocking the view of the camera, it has a greater total viewing area (not being blocked by a wall).

PTZ security cameras are controlled by any a variety of different methods.  They can be controlled using a PTZ controller board which has a joystick and push buttons or they can often be controlled by keyboard buttons alone. Each of Security Camera King’s featured DVR’s the Elite-Mini, Elite, and Ultimate series also offer’s a unique mouse PTZ control.  The camera movements can be controlled by clicking the camera’s view on the monitor screen and pointing and dragging the mouse.  The PTZ camera will follow the mouse’s movement.

In addition, PTZ security cameras can also be purchased with optional auto-tracking features.  Auto-tracking is a special function that enables the camera to detect motion, follow the object, and zoom in on the object automatically to provide the most advantageous view.  This feature is often used by security departments responsible for large retail parking lots or industrial employee parking lots to maintain security coverage in these areas.  When cars or individuals enter or move around the parking lot the camera can keep track of them every inch of the way.

Another common feature of PTZ security cameras is area specific preset patrol.  In this mode the camera is preset to patrol a specified area.  It can be set to track and follow in that specified area or when triggered can be set to pan, tilt, and/or zoom to a pre-determined specified area.

When choosing your PTZ security camera, make sure you purchase the appropriate type for the environment; cameras are either rated for use indoors or outdoors or both.  Next you’ll need to determine if you need the optional auto-tracking feature.

You will also need to determine the magnitude of the zoom function that you desire.  Generally, the greater the magnification of the zoom function, the more expensive the camera due to the precision lenses and electronic circuitry that are required to support it.  Lastly, you will need to determine what type of mount you’ll need for the camera.

Checkout Security Camera King’s full line of PTZ security cameras by clicking on  “Pan Tilt Security Cameras“.

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