Posts Tagged ‘ video recorder’



Bus Surveillance Cameras

Written By:
Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Bus Surveillance CamerasIf you are a school bus driver and you have bus surveillance cameras, you know what a blessing they truly are.  Equipment that is visible (whether it’s actually working or off) has an incredibly large deterrence factor.  This doesn’t apply to just school buses but all kinds of buses and public transportation.

What is different on bus surveillance cameras than on regular surveillance cameras?  First, the whole system is a bit different.  Here is why.

A typical digital video surveillance system consists of one or more cameras, a Digital Video Recorder or DVR, and a monitor.  The cameras capture the video images, process them and send them to the DVR where they are processed further and saved on the DVRs Hard Disk Drive (HDD).  The HDD on a typical surveillance system is the same type of disk drive that is found on a personal computer.  It can hold terabytes of information but doesn’t do well when under the forces of vibration.

Bus surveillance camera systems are a little different.  First and foremost is the DVR.  The vibrations for normal travel of the bus are libel to make the hard disk skip and not record the video images properly.  Now there are many different types of bus surveillance systems and accordingly corresponding DVRs.  However the one thing that bus surveillance camera systems have in common is that most of these systems use non-moving parts.

They are able to endure very harsh environments making them well suited for
high risk vehicle applications like school buses, law enforcement, EMS,
transit, taxi, service or delivery vehicles that require rugged solid state
dependability for video evidence.

Creating a system with non moving parts is important because of the vibrations that are created by the bus.  The bus surveillance camera system must be able to work properly in spite of that factor.  SO how do they do it?  Most bust surveillance camera systems use a “no moving parts” SD recorder system.  All of the footage is saved on the SD card and when it’s full you just pull that card and insert another one or re-write over the one that’s already in the DVR.

These SD cards can be removed and inserted into a computer to view or store any of the media that is on the card.  The technology for creating these cards is constantly improving yielding greater and greater storage capacities.  Today, they can easily place a 2 hour trip on one card.

Bus surveillance cameras come in many configurations as well.  Some units are made with the camera, DVR, and monitor all in on piece.  Other units allow for the DVR to be mounted somewhere on the bus while up to four different cameras can be used for more comprehensive coverage.  Some of these multi camera systems are able to record all four cameras at once in D1 resolution.  Furthermore these multi bus surveillance camera systems, because of the larger separate DVRs can have record times of 60 to 200 hours!

Another benefit of bus surveillance cameras is that not only can they record unsafe or dangerous activities of the passengers but they can also record unsafe or reckless driving activities of the bus driver offering dual protection.  The following is a list of just some of the passenger activities that have been documented already on buses (school, public transportation, etc.):

  • Civil or criminal violations of the law
  • Drug use, sale, or distribution
  • Gang related activities
  • Vandalism such as cutting the seats, graffiti on bus surfaces
  • Sexual acts with or without consent
  • Throwing objects out the windows
  • Assaults, abuse or other harassment against the bus driver
  • Alcohol abuse or smoking while inside the bus
  • Standing or walking in the bus while the bus itself is in motion.

As we mentioned earlier, bus surveillance cameras provide dual coverage because they can provide documentation of the activities of the passengers as well as the driver.  Here’s a short list of driver related activities that have been documented:

  • Running red lights or stop signs
  • Failure to stop at railroad intersections
  • Bus driver, while driving, is drinking, eating, sending text messages, or using their cell phone for casual conversation
  • In vehicle driver passenger interaction, arguments, or abuse
  • Accident can be documented with the video used in court as evidence

If you are interested in more information concerning bus surveillance cameras, contact one of Security Camera King’s security experts today.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Electrical Outlet Camera

Written By:
Friday, February 18th, 2011

Why would anyone want to have an electrical outlet camera? That’s precisely what you’ll want people to think. That’s what makes the electrical outlet camera so ideal for covert digital video security and surveillance applications.

Half the battle of creating a great, undetectable or covert digital video camera system is having the technology to produce a camera and Digital Video Recorder or DVR small enough to be concealed or disguised in other objects. The other half of the battle of design is finding an object that is so common that the object itself goes unnoticed.

Enter Security Camera King’s “Electrical Outlet Hidden Camera with DVR and 8GB SD Card.”

This electrical outlet camera is actually a collection of technological innovations and it’s not only a camera but a mini digital video security system all in one. There is only one thing this unit won’t do; IT WILL NOT FUNCTION AS AN ACTUAL ELECTRICAL OUTLET. But what it won’t do as far as the outlet is concerned, it more than makes up for in the .
hidden security camera department
This electrical outlet camera has the appearance of one of those outlet devices that plugs into both outlets on a wall plate, splitting them into a total of six different outlets with ground receptacles. Although the unit does not function as an electrical outlet, it does derive its power from the actual outlet it is plugged into.

The outlet contains a digital video color security camera with a resolution of 380 TVL. In addition it features automatic motion activated recording, scheduled recording, and remote control operation. The recording features include a “time and date stamp” for further documentation accuracy.

The electrical outlet camera’s built in DVR offers plenty of features too. The DVR records to SD card media so the recording capacity time is dependent on the size of the card. An 8 Gigabyte (GB) SD card is included which allows you to record up to 144 hours of video AND audio. However, if that’s not enough, purchase your own additional SD card(s) with a greater capacity (a 16 GB SD card for example) and extend your recording time to up to 288 hours.

The built-in DVR in this electrical outlet camera uses the MPEG-4 CODEC. A Compression/DECompression utility or CODEC is used to compress large digital video files into smaller ones without losing a significant amount of quality. Digital video security cameras actually create their video footage by taking several digital photographs in rapid succession. When played back in rapid succession these photographs fool the human eye into seeing a fluid motion video. Motion video can be created with as few as 12 photographs (also known as “frames) taken every second up to as many as 30 frames per second or fps. The following lists the approximate maximum recording times based on the use of the included 8 GB SD Card:

Resolution at 640 x 480 and 12 fps
• High Quality–approximately 8 hours recording time.
• Medium Quality–approximately 48 hours recording time.
• Low quality– approximately 72 hours recording time; and for

Resolution at 320 x 240 and 30 fps
• High Quality–approximately 16 hours recording time.
• Medium Quality–approximately 96 hours recording time.
• Low Quality–approximately 144 hours recording time.

Once you have finished recording, pull out the easy-to-remove SD card and download the digital video files right to your personal computer where you can view, copy, and/or archive the files. For some computers without a multi-media card reader, you may be required to purchase one of these for your computer.

But that’s not all! The included miniature DVR is more that just a recording device, it can play back the files as well. If you don’t have a computer, you can still view your captured color digital video by using the included RCA cable to connect the unit to your television.

This electrical outlet camera is great for use a home or office security or surveillance camera. Since the unit is totally self-sufficient or a stand alone, that it, it doesn’t require any other devices to work, it can be used in a variety of applications. Retail store merchandise monitoring, employee monitoring in the office, as a nanny cam in the home, and warehouse monitoring are just some of the possible uses for this device.

Check out our product number HC-OUTLT-DVR or go to http://www.securitycameraking.com/electrical-outlet-hidden-camera-with-58962-prd1.html for more information.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Camera Video Monitor

Written By:
Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

A camera video monitor is used to view either the field of vision being captured by one camera or by a series of cameras in a digital video security system. Digital video camera monitors have made great strides in technological improvements in the last several years producing a higher quality, lighter, and more adaptive piece of digital video security system equipment.

It’s important to understand a little about the history of camera video monitors in security camera systems and how they used to work compared to how they work today. Let’s take a closer look at a camera video monitor.

First, we should identify the three main components of a video security system. That includes one to several video cameras, a video recorder, and at least one camera video monitor. Note that the word “digital” did not appear in the previous two sentences because we are referring to the older analog video security camera systems.

The older analog video camera systems consisted of analog video cameras which were basically miniature version of cameras used in an average television studio. However, since television cameras “broadcasted” their signal to the general public, security video cameras were often (and still maybe today) referred to as Closed Circuit Television or CCTV. The circuit is closed because the security system camera sends its signal to the video recorder and monitor, a closed circuit, rather than broadcasting it for unrestricted access.

The recorders used in these older analog systems were usually analog video tape recorders such as a VHS or BETA recorder and the monitors were basically miniature televisions. In contrast we use digital video security cameras, Digital Video Recorders or DVRs and high resolution camera video monitors with LCD, Plasma, or LED displays today.

The older “tube” type television camera video monitor and the analog video camera, worked with video in terms of “lines of resolution.” Without getting overly technical, the quality of these displays was much lower than today’s typical Plasma, LCD, or LED camera video monitor since the tube projected the image in alternating “lines.” Today the image is made up of pixels, extremely small dots or squares that can provide a much greater (or finer) resolution, and therefore a much higher quality display image.

Often times, older analog cameras would require an individual camera video monitor for each camera. Today however, depending on the size and resolution of the display, all of the cameras within a system can be displayed on one monitor. In fact, the digital video security systems used today do not require a camera video monitor to operate. A monitor is used to set the system up initially, but may be removed after the initial settings have been made. Yet, the monitor is still the component with the highest use since it is used to view live or recorded video in one way or another.

Of the three types of camera video monitors used today, the LCD is the most prevalent. Since video security systems have become digital, they have gained access to many of the technological improvements of personal computers. Therefore, monitors that are currently used for personal computing may also be used for digital video security systems with one provision; the monitor must have the capability to display using the output connectors for the system.

Personal computer monitors typically have VGA (Video Graphics Array), DVI (Digital Video Interface), or HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) connectors for video input. Security digital video cameras however still utilize RG-59 coaxial cable with a BNC (Bayonet Neill-Concelman) connector. Most computer display monitors do not have BNC inputs; most security camera video monitors DO have BNC inputs.

This is important because if you choose to place a monitor on a single or specific camera, chances are it will need a BNC input connector. While most DVRs have BNC connectors for the camera inputs, they usually have several different output types to the monitor (VGA, DVI, and HDMI for example). When you purchase a camera video monitor for your security system, just make sure the outputs of the cameras and/or DVR matches the input connections of the monitor.

Security Camera King offers a wide variety of camera video monitors available for purchase. What’s more is that we also have BNC to VGA Monitor Converters available which allows you to view your video security camera with a BNC connector on a VGA monitor. In addition we also have monitor mounts available. For more information, talk to one of our security experts.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail