Posts Tagged ‘ wireless security camera’



Infrared Wireless Security Camera

Written By:
Sunday, January 30th, 2011

An infrared wireless security camera offers the ease of do-it-yourself installation and the versatility of total darkness digital video recording. Weather you choose and indoor or outdoor type camera, these cameras can be mounted just about anywhere provided you can provide them with a power source to operate. In addition, infrared wireless security cameras do not require any other special add-on equipment to function.

Infrared wireless security cameras are used for many different applications. The following is just a short, partial list of some of those uses:
• Residential Indoor Applications. In areas that are not always lit, such as storage areas, garages, or any room that is dark. These cameras are excellent for use as baby monitor cameras.
• Industrial (and/or Commercial) Indoor Applications. In any area that is not well lit especially storage facilities, chemical or hazmat storage and use areas, retail store “back” rooms, night time exits and entrances, etc.
• Residential Outdoor Applications. Anywhere outside the house that you want to cover a perimeter zone that surrounds the house: Drive ways, garages or shops not attached to the main home, entrance gates, boats, and barns.
• Industrial (and/or Commercial) Outdoor Applications. Outside store perimeters, no-trespassing areas that may be difficult to patrol in darkness, night-time (or no-light condition) equipment operation areas, rooms and offices that are vacant at night, areas where money and other valuables are stored.

These cameras have the added advantage of performing as a normal visible light digital video camera when sufficient light is available and as an infrared light digital video camera when there is an insufficient amount of light. When the cameras are operating under visible light conditions, they provide a high-quality color display; and when operating under infrared conditions they provide a high-quality black and white or monochromatic video image.

As the description indicates, an infrared wireless security camera does not require the use of a video transmission cable. Non-wireless cameras must have an RG-59 coaxial or similar cable run from each camera to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR. This cabling can complicate installation and some users may feel that, although the cable can be hidden most of the time, when it is visible it can be obtrusive.

Infrared wireless security cameras use one of many different types of wireless technologies to send their video data to a corresponding receiver, or directly to a DVR unit that has a built-in receiver. One of the most popular wireless technologies used for this purpose is the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz technology due to its crisp, clear mostly interference free transmission/reception. (This is the same technology used on many landline-based wireless telephones.)

If the signal is received by a corresponding wireless receiver, the receiver is usually located near the DVR unit and is connected to it by a cable. Some DVRs made specifically for wireless applications have on-board receivers that “catch” the cameras’ transmission and relay it directly to the DVR for further processing.

Most infrared wireless security cameras radio technologies are based on something called a Line Of Sight range or LOS. An LOS range means the camera’s maximum transmission range is based on LOS. This means the camera’s maximum transmission is specified based on a situation where there is an unobstructed view (or LOS) between the camera and the receiver. Although obstructions do not usually cancel the transmission, they do reduce the maximum range based on their material composition.

The interesting thing about infrared wireless security cameras is that they are intrinsically sensitive to infrared radiation. The digital video camera uses one of two sensors, a Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS or a Charge Coupled Device CCD, to convert light images into electrical signals that create digital video images. Both of these sensors can detect not only visible light, but infrared light of the near-infrared wavelength. Furthermore, the cameras’ sensors can “see” the infrared light, but the human eye cannot. There for the light used for infrared illumination is literally invisible to the human eye.

Infrared wireless security cameras normally used infrared Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs to create the illumination for the camera. These LEDs may be configured in an array surrounding the camera lens, off to the side, or entirely separate on an infrared “illuminator.” Generally, the more LEDS the longer the range of capturing in total darkness conditions. For that reason, always check the specifications before purchasing the camera to make sure it meets your required range.

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Night Vision Wireless Security Camera

Written By:
Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Tired of not being able to see things that go “bump” in the dark? If that’s the case, you need a night vision wireless security camera. These cameras take advantage of the latest technology in digital camera security systems, are easy to install, and are reasonably priced as well.

Can a night vision wireless security camera actually “see” in the dark? Well, indirectly the answer is yes. Although the camera doesn’t actually “see” in the dark, it uses infrared illumination to light the target area of the camera. This infrared illumination is actually invisible to the human eye, so we can’t see it, but the camera can. Before we get ahead of ourselves let’s back up and start at the beginning.

There are many types of digital video security cameras based on appearance and function. The night vision wireless security camera is one of those types that contains highly specialized features for highly specialized applications. Some of the other optional features that are available include the following:

• Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ. This feature allows the camera to move “left and right” and “up and down” which greatly increases the field of vision of the camera. This camera can also “zoom in” on objects to enlarge their view.
• Motion Detection. Camera can come equipped with motion detectors that turn the camera recording on only when motion is detected.
• Audio Recording. Sounds can also be recorded as well as conducting two-way audio communication.
• Internet Protocol or IP ready. Cameras can connect to and use the Internet for networking.

Let’s keep the “focus” (pun intended) on a night vision wireless security camera. First, the camera operates by transferring light images into electronic impulses that can be measured to create digital video images. In digital video language, this transferring of images is normally referred to as “capturing.”

The night vision wireless security camera captures images by using a very special electronic sensor. There are actually two different types of sensors and although they capture images in a slightly different way, they both produce the same end result (a digital video image.) One of the sensors is a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and the other is a Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.

It just so happens, that both CCDs and CMOSs are inherently sensitive to not only the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation we call “visible light” but are also sensitive to infrared radiation or “invisible infrared light.” (We call it invisible because as mentioned earlier, the human eye cannot see it.) Specifically, most night vision wireless security cameras are inherently sensitive to a band of infrared radiation called “near infrared radiation” or for our purpose, we’ll call infrared illumination.

So where does the infrared illumination originate? There are some small amounts that are emitted (or radiated) from objects, especially heat and light sources. However, a night vision wireless security camera normally provides its own illumination using an array of infrared Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs that surround the camera lens or are right next to it pointing in the direction of the camera’s field of vision.

The infrared LEDs use much less electricity than a typical filament light, and the illumination they emit can’t be seen by humans but can be detected by the night vision wireless security camera. There are some camera/systems that do not include LEDs around the lens but may use separate infrared LED “illuminators.” These illuminators can also be used with cameras that do already have LEDs to extend their range.

This brings us to an important point. Since the LEDs provide the illumination for the night vision wireless security camera, every camera has a range. Be certain before purchasing your camera that you know what range you will require and that the camera you are purchasing can capture images within that range.

Finally, as the name indicates, a night vision wireless security camera does not require a video transmission cable to be run from each camera to the DVR as other non-wireless systems do. The camera takes advantage of one of many different types of wireless technologies to send its images via radio waves to a receiver or a DVR with a built-in receiver. One example of this technology is 2.4 or 5.8 MHz technology; the same used for wireless land-line based telephones. Talk about making installation easy!

Contact one of our security experts via our on-line “Live Chat” or via telephone if you have any additional questions concerning a night vision wireless security camera.

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Wireless Outdoor Security Camera Systems

Written By:
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

A wireless outdoor security camera system can be used for many different applications. The system is easy to install, easy to operate, and incredibly versatile in application. Since the wireless outdoor security camera does not require a video transmission cable to be run from each camera to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR, you may want to consider this system if cabling the system is impractical, undesirable, or simply can’t be done.

Standard standalone digital video security systems have three major components: 1) One to several digital video cameras; 2) A Digital Video Recorder or DVR; and, 3) one or more color monitors. The digital video cameras capture light images and turn them into electronic data that is sent to the DVR. The DVR creates a digital video file that can be viewed that instant (live) on the monitor and/or stored on the DVR for later viewing, archiving, etc.

These systems are connected by the use of various wires and cables. For instance, each digital video camera must have a coaxial cable run from the camera to the DVR unit. This video transmission cable is usually RG-59 type coaxial video transmission cable. It carries the video data from the camera to the DVR unit to be processed. Each camera also must have a smaller low-voltage DC wire run to it from either a power distribution supply box or a nearby plug-in transformer.

Wireless outdoor security camera systems eliminate the need to install the digital video transmission cable. Instead of using RG-59 coaxial cable the camera sends its video data to the DVR by radio wave signals. This is normally done in one of two ways. Either the camera sends its radio signal to a corresponding receiver which is located near the DVR unit and connected to it by cables, or the DVR unit itself has on-board receivers that the camera broadcasts its signal to.

The camera of a wireless outdoor security system may not be entirely wireless. Although there is no need to run the RG-59 coaxial cable in these systems, the cameras still require a power supply which is normally provided by the power distribution center box or a nearby plug-in transformer. However, there are cameras that are battery operated, using either one-time-use or rechargeable batteries. These cameras are truly wireless in that they have no video transmission cable or power supply wires run to them.

Since outdoor security camera systems do not require video transmission cabling, they can be much quicker and easier to install. Mount the camera, plug it in, and it’s ready. Even easier to install are the battery operated cameras; just mount the camera (no need to run a power supply wire) and it’s ready to go.

Wireless outdoor security camera system cameras use various technologies to send their radio signals to the designated receiver or DVR. One of the most popular methods that is used is the 2.4 or 5.8 MHz technology; this is the same technology used to send land-line based cordless telephone signals. It’s useful for this purpose because the signal is strong and virtually interference free.

It is important to note that the camera-receiver (or DCR with built-in receiver) relationship on wireless outdoor security camera systems have different specified ranges. Not all cameras have the same range. In fact wireless cameras may have a manufacturer’s specified range of from 30 feet to 2 miles Line Of Sight or LOS. LOS means a direct path in a straight line from camera to receiver that has no objects blocking the path. In other words, if you are standing at the point where the camera is mounted, you should be able to see the receiver (i.e. LOS).

Although the range is specified as LOS, it doesn’t necessarily mean that an impeding object along the path will prevent reception. In fact, seldom is the reception actually blocked by impeding objects; normally the range is just reduced. The reduction of the range is variable based on the transmission signal technology used and the material make up of the object(s) that fall within the LOS. Windows have less effect that walls or trees for example. This is not unusual as cordless telephones share this same sort of LOS range. Therefore, be certain the specified range of the camera satisfies your requirements before purchasing the camera or system.

Other than the need for replacing or recharging batteries, the cameras in a wireless outdoor security camera system or relatively maintenance free.

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Wireless Security Camera with DVR Recorder

Written By:
Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

One of the most popular security devices being used today is the wireless security camera with DVR recorder (Digital Video Recorder).Since the camera is wireless, this means no cables are needed to connect the camera with the recorder, making installation quick and easy. In addition to the wireless feature, a wireless security camera with DVR recorder system has plenty of optional features that make this an incredibly versatile system that can be used for almost any application.

A wireless security camera with DVR recorder is often the choice for do-it-yourself security and surveillance systems because of the ease of installation. Normally, a digital video camera requires to wire hookups. The first is a video transmission cable, usually RG-59 coaxial cable, that must be installed from each individual camera to the DVR. The second wire hookup is a low-voltage DC power supply wire which comes from either a power distribution center box or a plug-in transformer.

If you are planning on installing the system yourself (and many customers do) running the RG-59 coaxial cable can sometimes be an overwhelming task. Installing the cable requires the proper tools and accessories that average homeowners may not own. For example, holes may need to be drilled through walls and average size drill bits aren’t long enough to accomplish this task. However, specialized extended length bits make this task a snap. Wall clamps and mounting hardware may be needed as well.

Although the RG-59 coaxial cable is relatively small, some home and business owners alike may find the appearance of this cable objectionable. It requires some experience and construction know-how to install this cable neatly, safely, and in such a way that it is hidden.

The same situations may also apply to the power supply wire although this wire is much smaller than the RG-59 coaxial cable. The power supply wire may be placed in the same run as the coaxial cable if a power distribution center box is used. If a plug-in transformer is used the run of the wire is often much shorter than that of the coaxial cable as the closest outlet is often used.

Nonetheless, the wireless security camera with DVR recorder is a much easier installation. First, there is no RG-59 coaxial cable that needs to be run from the camera to the DVR. Second, often times these cameras come with rechargeable batteries eliminating the power supply wire. The installation of a wireless camera with rechargeable batteries for a power supply is basically just attaching the camera mount to the surface where the camera will be placed.

A wireless security camera with DVR recorder sends its video data via radio waves instead of a coaxial transmission cable. The camera contains a built-in transmitter and antenna that sends the video data via radio waves to a corresponding receiver. The receiver converts the signals back into electronic data and sends it to the nearby DVR via a connection cable. There are many different types of signal architectures but probably the most common is the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz band technology. This is the same technology used for land-line based wireless telephones.

Wireless receivers are able to handle inputs from more than one camera at a time. In fact there are several variations on the number of camera inputs but the most common are 1, 4, or 8. If the security system requires more cameras than what the receiver can provide, additional receivers can be used provided they have different frequencies available for each additional camera and the DVR is designed for the number of cameras used. (Systems requiring a number of camera inputs greater than the capacity of the DVR simply use additional DVRs.)

Wireless transmission technology is based on Line of Sight or LOS. This means that the specified range of the wireless camera is based on a situation where the camera antenna has a direct Line Of Sight to the receiver’s antenna. In other words, this maximum distance is based on no objects impeding the LOS between the two. If an object does exist between the two it doesn’t necessarily mean that the camera and receiver won’t work. In fact, usually the object just reduces the range. The amount of the reduction is based on the type of object or material that impedes the LOS (such as a window, wall, trees, etc.).

So if you are looking for an easy do-it-yourself installation but versatile in application system, a wireless security camera with DVR recorder is the perfect solution for you.


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Wireless Security Camera to PC

Written By:
Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

A wireless security camera to PC (Personal Computer) may be the solution for you if you are looking for a quick and easy self-installation video security system. Thanks to modern technological advances, the average homeowner can now afford a wireless security camera to PC system; but the are limited to residential use only. A wireless security camera to PC system makes a great video surveillance/security system for offices and businesses as well.

Let’s take a brief look at how a standard non-wireless security camera system works so we can compare it to the installation, components, and operation of a wireless security camera to PC system. For the most part, the biggest advantage of a wireless security camera to PC system is that if you already have an existing PC you may be able to use it for your security system, greatly reducing the total cost of the system. However, let’s take a closer look.

Digital video security camera systems are component systems. This means that there are basic parts or pieces (components) that are needed to make the system work. However, since they are a component system, you can use different components that are made with specific features to meet your needs. In addition, the each component can be made by a different manufacturer as well. For example, instead of purchasing a four camera system where every camera is exactly the same and may not exactly suit your needs, you can purchase four different cameras such as an indoor, an outdoor, an infrared, and a Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera that specifically meet the requirements of your security needs.

A typical component system consists of one to several digital video cameras, a Digital Video Recorder (DVR) with a processor, and a monitor. The digital video cameras transfer light images into electronic data that is normally sent to the DVR using an RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable.

The DVR has a hard disk drive just like the one found in a PC. In addition, the DVR normally has a highly specialized processor, much like the PC processor but built specifically to handle the tasks of security video processing. This processing includes applying a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility to make the very large digital video files smaller without sacrificing quality. This makes the files easier to handle for the processor, DVR, and monitor, including the ability to store longer time periods of video on the DVR. A CD/DVD recorder, Flash drive connection, or other device may also be used to copy the digital video file to another transportable media (this may be necessary to provide to police, insurance companies, as evidence, etc.).

In a wireless security camera to PC system, the same functions are performed but with a few changes. First, the digital video camera does not send its digital video data via the RG-59 coaxial video transmission cable. Instead, the camera contains an on-board transmitter and antenna which it uses to send the digital video data via radio waves. There are several different types of radio technology that are used to send the signal but probably the most common is the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz band technology, the same used for land-line based wireless phones.

The signal is sent to a corresponding receiver that then sends the signal via a transmission cable to a PC card. Some systems have the receiver built right into the PC card, eliminating the need for a separate receiver. The PC card is usually a PCI type PC card that can be added to one of the computers empty PCI extension slots or bays. The card is designed to capture or process the digital video data and apply the CODEC to create a compact digital video file with high quality.

After the PC card processes the video data and creates a digital video file, it then stores the file using the computer’s hard disk drive and the video can be viewed live or reviewed later as the recorded file on the computer’s monitor. As you can see, using a wireless security camera to PC system eliminates the need for the DVR with processor and the monitor, thereby reducing the cost of the overall system.

There are several variations of wireless security camera to PC systems that are designed to meet different needs. Contact one of our security experts via live chat or telephone if you would like more information.

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