Posts Tagged ‘ wireless security cameras’



Wireless Home Security Internet Cameras

Written By:
Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

If you don’t want to install a coaxial video transmission cable from each camera to your Digital Video Recorder (DVR) or personal computer wireless home security internet cameras may be the perfect answer for you. Recent advances in computer and electronics technology have made these cameras easy to use and economically priced so that they are affordable for just about any budget.

Before we talk about wireless home security internet cameras, let’s just briefly discuss a “wired” home security internet camera system so we can better understand the differences between the two. There are basically two different types of home security internet cameras with the major difference between the two being how the system accesses the internet.

One example of a “wired” home security internet camera system is comprised of digital video cameras that are connected to a DVR by RG-59 or similar coaxial cable. Each camera must have a cable run from it to the DVR unit. These cables carry the digital video image data that is captured by the camera and converted into a storable, viewable digital video file by the DVR. The DVR can store the video for later viewing or for archiving purposes. The DVR also contains internet server technology so that it can send the camera signals over the internet.

Normally, the DVR connects to the internet using a standard CAT 5 Ethernet connection (the same connection you would use to connect a personal computer to the internet). Since the DVR contains already contains the programming and server technology, once the cameras are connected to the DVR and the DVR is connected to the internet, the system is ready for use. These systems often use standard web browsers that can utilize JAVA programming to control the system. A typical internet browser that would work with such a system is the Windows Internet Explorer, however some systems do have their own proprietary software that needs to be installed on the controlling personal computer.

The second example of a “wired” home security internet camera system is created by using Internet Protocol or IP ready cameras. These cameras each contain their own internet server technology. Instead of being connected to a DVR via an RG-59 coaxial cable, they are connected to the internet, once again using a standard CAT-5 Ethernet cable. Each camera is connected to your broadband internet connection using an internet router if necessary. Once these cameras are connected to the internet, the system is ready for use. Once again, these cameras can be accessed with a standard internet browser or with the manufacturer’s proprietary software.

Wireless home security internet cameras work in a similar way, however they take advantage of wireless technology to transmit their signals instead of using the RG-59 coaxial cable. This makes them much easier to install and eliminates the work of running a cable from each camera to the DVR. There are basically two types of wireless home security internet cameras also.

The first example is similar to the first wired example. These wireless home security internet cameras connect to a DVR using wireless technology. The normally use the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz radio band technology to transmit their video image data to a corresponding wireless receiver which is connected by a cable to the DVR. This wireless technology is basically the same used for land-line residential wireless telephones.

The DVR is connected to the internet, normally by a Cat 5 Ethernet cable. The DVR contains the programming and server technology so that once the cameras are set up and the DVR is connected to the internet, the system is ready to use. As above, a standard web browser or the DVR manufacturer’s proprietary software is used to view and control the system.

The second example of wireless home security internet cameras is where the camera connects directly to the internet, but wirelessly. This system usually does not utilize a direct connection between the cameras and a DVR and often uses a personal computer’s hard disk drive as the storage medium for the digital video files.

Each camera contains its own internet server technology and instead of connecting to the DVR, it connects via a wireless connection to your broadband internet connection. These cameras normally connect to the internet through a wireless modem or router using WiFi or 802.11 wireless internet connection technology.

Whichever method you choose, wireless home security internet cameras eliminate the need for running a transmission cable making them a cinch to install and operate.

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Business Wireless Security Camera Packages

Written By:
Monday, August 16th, 2010

Digital video security cameras normally use an RG-59 coaxial cable to transmit their video signal. Each camera must have a cable run to the Digital Video Recorder or DVR. If this cabling is impractical for your business or office, or you need cameras placed fairly large distances from the DVR (such as industrial settings) then business wireless security camera packages could be your practical solution.

Business wireless security camera packages can be used in a variety of settings instead of typical cabled digital video cameras. Some examples include large industrial areas or commercial warehouses that may contain several buildings that are widely separated, retail facility parking lots, or places where cameras must be mounted that are hard to reach or cable (such as building tops or towers).

A wireless security camera is named as such because these units do not use the RG-59 coaxial cable or any other cable for that matter, for their video transmission. Instead, these cameras operate by sending their video signal via radio waves to a corresponding receiver. The cameras normally use the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz band radio technology for sending their signals. This is the same type of technology that is used in contemporary land-line based wireless telephones.

Our business wireless security camera packages specifications normally list the ranges for the camera and receiver signal transmission and reception. Camera models vary but some boast ranges of up to 2.5 miles. These ranges are often listed as LOS or Line Of Sight. This means the range listed is the maximum range provided the camera and receiver have a direct line of sight between each other. In other words, the range specification is for unimpeded distance between the two.

However, LOS does not mean that if there is an object that stands between the camera and the receiver, that the video signal will not be successfully transmitted and received. In fact, most business wireless security cameras have walls, windows, or buildings between them. These objects can completely block the signal but seldom do. Normally the signal is just weakened in that the range is reduced. Seldom is there a problem with procuring a model that does not have enough transmission range or power for the job.

Business wireless security camera packages are available with just about any of the options or additional features that their “wired” counterparts can possess. This includes audio recording, Pan-Tilt-Zoom or PTZ functions, and motion detector switching. Wireless cameras come in all shapes as well including box, bullet, and dome shapes. There are also day/night vision and night vision infrared business wireless security cameras.

Another interesting feature available for business wireless security cameras packages is IP or Internet Protocol ready. This feature means that the camera is pre-manufactured to be ready for access using the internet. The internet is used as the vehicle for transmission of the video signal from the cameras’ receiving unit. This also means that the cameras can be accessed (monitored and controlled) from just about anywhere in the world there is internet access. Quite often these cameras only require a common web browser such as Internet Explorer to be accessed. Some cameras also come with their own proprietary software. These systems are gaining popularity not only because of their economic price and ease of installation, but because business owners and managers and keep a “watchful eye” on their businesses while away on travel, at home, or on vacation.

If you are thinking of upgrading or purchasing your first digital video security system, ask our security experts if business wireless security camera packages are right for you. You can reach them by clicking on the live chat button on our home page or by calling us today at 1-866-573-8878 Monday through Friday from 9am to 6pm EST.

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Wireless 16 Camera Motion Detector Security Systems

Written By:
Monday, July 19th, 2010

Wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems are the ultimate solution for digital video camera surveillance and security. The wireless cameras not only provide quick and easy installation, but can be installed just about anywhere. In addition, the motion detection feature provides for conservative storage needs on Digital Video Recorders (DVRs) and if used with the Tilt-Pan-Zoom (PTZ) function can be used to track objects or individuals throughout a camera’s useful field of view.

Typical wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems consist of 16 wireless cameras with motion detection, up to 4 wireless receiver units, one 16 channel standalone DVR unit, and monitor(s). However, there are several variations on this system based on the type of components used and the type of motion detection desired.

Let’s talk about the cameras of wireless 16 camera motion detector systems. The wireless cameras used in these security systems are digital video cameras. These cameras create video images by using one of two special sensor chips. A Charged Coupled Device or CCD or Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor chip converts light energy into electrical energy that can be measured and used to produce high quality color (or black and white) video images.

These cameras transmit their video signals using built-in transmitters and antennas to receiver units. Most receiver units can handle up to 4 separate cameras at one time; that is why there may be up to 4 receivers used for a 16 camera system. The signals are normally transmitted over the 2.4 or 5.8 GHz band although there are still some models that may use the 900 MHz band. This wireless technology is basically the same that is used for wireless home telephones.

Wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems may use cameras with different ranges. The range of a wireless camera is based on Line Of Sight or LOS which means the maximum specified range is based on an unobstructed distance between the camera and the receiver. Cameras can still transmit with objects in the LOS but the maximum range will usually be reduced based on the type of material that makes up the object.

Wireless cameras may be indoor or outdoor types. Outdoor cameras are just like indoor models except they are enclosed in a protective case or cover. This cover or case protects the camera from weather and other natural elements from penetrating the case and thereby affecting the camera. These cameras are often rated according to an International Electrical code standard known as the Ingress Protection Rating. Cameras that protect completely from dust and various levels of water penetration are best so look for cameras with IP66 or IP67 ratings.

The cameras used in wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems may also be day/night vision cameras or night vision infrared cameras. Day/night cameras have very sensitive sensor chips that produce high quality color video with very little available visible light. Night vision infrared cameras produce high quality color video in conditions with visible light and high quality black and white video in total darkness by using infrared illumination.

Other options for these cameras include audio recording, pan-tilt-zoom, and hidden or disguised cameras.

Wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems may actually implement the motion detection function by one of two ways. The first method is by a motion detector sensor that is mounted directly on the camera or is a part of the camera case or mount. These cameras use something known as a Passive InfraRed or PIR sensor. The sensor works by detecting the changes in infrared radiation light in its field of view. Once a change is detected, an assumption is made that motion has caused this sudden change, and the PIR triggers a switch that turns on the camera or initiates recording video for a camera that is already on.

The second method of motion detection lies within the programming of the processor/DVR unit. These units can contain programming in the form of software or as hard wired programming that can detect movement in the camera’s field of view. This type of motion detection can be incredibly useful when used with PTZ functions because the camera can be programmed to literally track the movement of an object or an individual. These cameras are often used in parking lots and retail stores.

Wireless 16 camera motion detector security systems are the ultimate security system because of versatility, ease of installation, and affordable price. Check with our digital security experts to get your system today.

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Wireless Security Cameras For Home Protection

Written By:
Monday, June 21st, 2010

If you are looking for a state-of-the-art security system for your house, try using wireless security cameras for homes. Wireless security cameras for homes come in many different varieties making them incredibly versatile in application, and thanks to modern technology the prices are affordable too.

Not long ago, security camera systems used Closed Circuit Television cameras that sent an analog video signal to a processor/recorder that made the signal useable for viewing and recorded it on video tape. Tape cartridges were either replaced when they were full or special loop cartridges would repeat recording new video over older footage.

Digital video cameras and other modern technology has drastically changed surveillance cameras and their applications and made it possible to utilize wireless security cameras for homes. Video tape is no longer needed because the newest cameras are digital video cameras. Instead of sending an analog signal, these cameras send digital video signals which can be stored on digital hard drives or Digital Video Recorders (DVR). These cameras have also made it possible to have wireless security cameras for homes.

The major difference between wireless security cameras for homes and cameras that are “wired” is that the wireless camera has its own on-board transmitter and antenna. The wireless camera transmits its digital video signal via the antenna to a receiver, which is normally located near the monitor and/or DVR. Not only has using digital video made this possible but the advanced technology behind the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz radio band has permitted ranges for these cameras up to two miles.

Most wireless security cameras for homes are not entirely without wires. Although they transmit their video signal via radio waves, they still must receive some sort of electrical power supply. Generally this power supply is in the form of a thin wire that carries low voltage DC current from an AC power adaptor that is plugged in nearby or from a power distribution box that performs the same function for many cameras. However, eliminating the coaxial transmission wire means that it is not necessary to cable each camera to the processor/DVR unit. Basically, installing a wireless camera is as easy as mounting the camera and plugging it into the power source.

Wireless security cameras for home can be indoor or outdoor types. Outdoor models are much like indoor models except they are enclosed in a protective cover or case. Outdoor cameras are usually rated using an International Electrical code standard. The rating, called an Ingress Protection or IP code, helps to define how much protection the case provides. Generally, most outdoor cameras are rated IP66 or IP67. Both ratings indicate the camera is dust tight; IP66 means it can withstand powerful jets of water and IP67 means it can be submerged in up to one meter of water without damaging the camera.

Wireless security cameras for home produce high quality color digital video. These cameras contain a sensor chip that transfers the light image focused on it from the lens into an electrical signal. One of two sensors is used; either a Charged Coupled Device or CCD or a Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.

These sensor chips can be so sensitive that they can produce high quality color video images in very low visible light conditions. Cameras that have these special sensitive chips are call day/night vision cameras and are often rated as to the degree of light that needs to be present to produce an image. The rating used is “lux” and cameras can be as sensitive as .002 lux; this light intensity rating is equivalent to the amount of visible light seen in a moonless clear night sky.

Other wireless security cameras for home may be night vision infrared cameras. These cameras can detect infrared (IR) illumination that is invisible to the human eye. The camera normally comes with several IR Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs that provide IR light for the camera. Since the light emitted is in the near infrared spectrum our eyes cannot detect it. These cameras are excellent for use as baby monitors.

Other options available for these cameras include the ability to record audio, Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ), and cameras that use rechargeable batteries instead of a power supply.

Today’s innovative technology has presented us with wireless security cameras for home for just about any purpose or environment. Wireless security cameras for home are as cinch to install and are reasonably priced as well.

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Wireless Night Vision Outdoor Security Camera

Written By:
Tuesday, June 1st, 2010

A wireless night vision outdoor security camera is a digital video camera with highly specialized features. Modern technological advancements have made these specialized features available at a very affordable price while offering high quality video images.

Outdoor security cameras differ from their counterparts the indoor security cameras, in that they are enclosed in a case that protects them from weather and environmental elements. Wireless night vision outdoor security cameras are often rated according to the protection that they offer. This protection is often described using an International Electrical Code standard called an Ingress Protection rating, International Protection Rating, or IP code. Most wireless night vision outdoor security cameras have an IP code of IP66 or IP67. IP66 means that the camera is dust tight and that water from powerful jets in any direction will have no harmful effects on the camera. IP67 means that the camera is dust tight and can withstand being submerged in water up to 1 meter in depth.

Digital video security cameras create images by using one of two special electronic sensor chips. Some digital security cameras use a Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS chip to create high quality color video images. Most wireless night vision outdoor security cameras use a Charged Coupled Device or CCD to create high quality color video using available visible light and high quality monochromatic or black and white video images using infrared (IR) radiation.

CCDs are highly sensitive to light energy known as photons. The CCD is able to transfer light energy into electrical energy in a somewhat similar process that a solar cell transfers sunlight into electricity. The electrical energy created by the CCD can be measured and digitally manipulated to create a video image. This is how a wireless night vision outdoor security camera creates high quality video in visible light conditions.

A wireless night vision outdoor security camera has a highly sensitive CCD that not only captures visible light but is inherently sensitive to radiation in the near infrared spectrum. This allows the camera to produce high quality video images in conditions of total darkness, with absolutely no visible light. These cameras contain an collection of IR Light Emitting Diodes or IR LEDs that surround the camera lens. The LEDs emit IR light that is not visible to the human eye, but lights up the cameras target area or field of vision like a flood light or spot light. Usually, the more LEDs that surround the camera lens, the farther the range that the camera can produce IR video in total darkness. Since IR radiation is not in the visible light spectrum, IR video is monochromatic or black and white.

Another specialized feature of a wireless night vision outdoor security camera is that it does not require a coaxial cable to transmit its video signals to the systems processor. “Wired” security cameras must be individually cabled to the processing unit. A wireless camera utilizes the 2.8 or 5.8 MHz radio band to transmit its video data by using an on-board antenna. The information is transmitted to a corresponding receiver that is normally located in the same area as the processor. After the receiver obtains the video signal it transfers it to the processor where a digital video file is created that may be viewed on a monitor or stored for later viewing or archival proposes.

Wireless night vision outdoor security cameras are available in different transmission ranges. The range is known as Line-Of-Sight or LOS. This means that the maximum transmission range stated for the camera is under conditions where there is an unimpeded line of sight between the camera’s antenna and the receiver’s antenna. Objects between them reduce the range, depending on the object’s size and material. Wireless cameras have LOS range capabilities of several hundred feet.

Additional features available for wireless night vision outdoor security cameras include the ability to record audio and the pan, tilt, and/or zoom (PTZ) functions. PTZ functions allow the camera to move in several directions and the zoom feature functions like a variable telephoto lens. These features can be controlled automatically or they may be controlled manually by remote control.

A wireless night vision outdoor security camera can be used anywhere that outdoor day/night video security and surveillance monitoring is needed. These cameras are often used for perimeter monitoring for both businesses and residents. In addition that can be used to provide monitoring for parking lots, driveways, and outdoor structures.

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