Posts Tagged ‘ infrared night vision’



Security Video Cameras

Written By:
Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

Security video cameras are one of three major components of today’s digital video security systems which also consist of a Digital Video Recorder or DVR and one or more monitors.  The digital video camera is an interesting piece of electronic wonder, and as technology continues to advance so do the features and abilities of the security video camera.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how a security video camera operates.  We’ll also take a look at some of the more common features and options that are available on today’s digital video security cameras.

Security video cameras are electronic based devices that transfer light images into electrical images that can be viewed on a monitor.   One of the key factors in accomplishing this is the electronic sensor that is used inside the camera to do the conversion.  Cameras make use of one of two different technologies with either one yielding the same end result.

 

These sensors are called a Charged Coupled Device or CCD and a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or CMOS.  The lenses focus the light image onto this small sensor chip (most range from about 1/4 inch 1/2 inch square).  The chip is sensitive to light energy in such a way that when light strikes the chip and electrical impulse is created that can be measured and used to construct a video image.

Ironically, even in digital security video cameras, the video signal that is created is originally analog in nature.   The signal is passed through a special Integrated Circuit or IC chip known as a analog-to-digital converter as well as a Digital Signal Processor or DSP before it is sent out the camera to the DVR.  In most systems the signal is sent along a cable (RG-59, CAT5, etc) from the camera directly to the DVR or monitor; hence the often used phrase “Closed Circuit TeleVision” or CCTV.

Once the video data reaches the DVR, it must be worked on some more by the DVRs DSP.  The data is gathered or compiled into a file called a digital video file.  Security video cameras create digital video files that can be played back by most personal computers and DVD players.  This digital video file is actually several digital photographs taken in raped succession over a very short time (usually around 30 photographs or frames per second or 30 fps).

The digital video file can quickly become several Gigabytes in size, especially when there are multiple cameras (which is usually the norm) recording at the same time.  There fore to make handling of the file easier for the processor and to get the maximum amount of time-recording per given storage capacity, the file is reduced to a fraction of its original size.

This is done by a COmpression/DECompression or CODEC utility.  The utility may be hardwired (usually an IC chip) or it may exist in the form of software.  Basically, a CODEC is a mathematical algorithm that finds a way to store repetitive data only once, thereby reducing file size while maintaining video quality.  Security Camera King’s DVRs all use the latest, most efficient CODEC known as H.264.

Security video cameras come in a variety of shapes, sizes, features, and price ranges.  Covering all of these variations is by far, beyond the capacity of this article, however we will attempt to try to cover some of the more popular characteristics.  If you would like additional more specific information on a camera variation, try searching our knowledge base for more information.

 

There are basically four types of security video cameras based on shape.  They are:

  • Box cameras;
  • Bullet cameras;
  • Dome cameras; and,
  • A variety of different hidden or disguised cameras that take the shape of the device they are built into.

These cameras are further made in one of three different styles based on where they are intended to be used.  These are:

  • Indoor cameras;
  • Outdoor cameras; and,
  • Indoor/Outdoor cameras.

In addition, cameras can come with a myriad of features.  Depending on the manufacturer and camera model, some features may be considered standard issue for the camera while others will be considered an option, usually with an additional cost:

  • Infrared night vision;
  • Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ);
  • Motion detection;
  • Very high resolution output;
  • Audio capability;
  • Internet compatible;
  • Explosion proof; and,
  • Wireless.

Generally speaking, if you have a specific security video camera need, there’s one out there that can nicely fit the bill.

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Outdoor Wireless Security Camera 500ft Range

Written By:
Monday, October 18th, 2010

An outdoor wireless security camera 500 ft range is adequate for most commercial and residential applications. This type of camera is easy to install and easy to operate and can be purchased with many optional features that greatly increase its versatility. In the following article we’ll talk a little about wireless security camera technology and some of the additional features that can be purchased for these cameras.

There are a few key factors that separates an outdoor wireless security camera 500ft range from other basic security cameras. First, as its name denotes, this camera is an outdoor camera. Outdoor security cameras are designed to withstand weather and other natural outdoor elements that can damage the camera or affect the working quality of the cameras.

When a security camera is specifically classed as an “outdoor” camera, it often has a rating in the camera specifications that indicates exactly how much protection is afforded to the camera from external objects. This rating, called an Ingress Protection rating or IP code, is an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard.

The code consists of the capital letters “IP” and two digits. The first digit indicates protection afforded against solids and the second digit indicates the protection afforded against liquids. The first digit’s scale ranges from 0-6 with 6 being the best protection, and the second digit’s scale ranges from 0-8 with 8 being the best protection. A good IP rating is IP65 or IP66.

IP65 means the camera is completely protected from dust and water jets from a nozzle coming from any direction. IP66 means the camera is completely protected from dust and water projected by powerful nets in any direction.

The other key feature of an outdoor wireless security camera 500ft range is that the camera uses wireless technology and has a maximum operating range of 500 feet. Non-wireless digital video security cameras work by creating a digital picture and transmitting the digital video data to a Digital Video Recorder (DVR) or monitor via a coaxial video transmission cable. This cable, usually an RG-59 coaxial cable must be run from each individual camera to the DVR or monitor. Wireless cameras eliminate this video transmission wire.

Outdoor wireless security cameras with a 500 foot range contain the internal circuitry to convert the digital data into a radio waveform that can be sent with out cabling. There are various radio technologies used to do this based on the manufacturer, but some of the more popular are the 900MHz an 2.4 or 5.8 GHz band radio technologies. These are the same sorts of technologies used by land line based wireless telephones.

One word about the camera radio technology. This technology is usually based on range which is defined as the maximum distance between the camera antenna and the receiver (or DVR) antenna based on Line Of Sight or LOS. LOS means this range should be attainable provided there is a clear line of sight between the two antennae, i.e. no objects can impede or block the LOS.

If there is not a clear LOS, it doesn’t mean the camera will not work. Usually, depending on the object(s) such as glass, trees, or walls instead of the camera signal failing, the range is just reduced. How much the camera’s signal is reduced is dependent on the material that the signal must penetrate. For example, it is not uncommon for an outdoor wireless security camera 500 ft range LOS to work at a 200 – 400 foot range through walls.

Digital video security cameras are powered by low voltage Direct Current (DC) electricity. This may occur as a small wire that is run from a power distribution center or a plug-in adapter that can be plugged into the nearest wall outlet. Since wireless cameras have already eliminated the need for a video transmission cable, some manufacturers make models that are totally wireless’ the camera can run off of power from batteries or rechargeable batteries.

There are many cameras with optional features that can be purchased. A few of these features include:
• Audio Recording
• Infrared Night Vision
• Day/night low visible light operation
• Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) operation
• IP or Internet Protocol ready

This should give you enough working knowledge to help you decide if you need an outdoor wireless security camera 500 ft range. If you have any other questions or would like to make a purchase, contact one our Security Camera King’s security experts today.

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