Archive for the ‘ Surveillance Cameras ’ Category



How to set up your TechproDDNS Acct

Written By:
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

How to set up your DVR for use with a TechProDDNS Domain

One of the problems with viewing your DVR remotely is that if your Internet service Provider or (ISP) changes your IP address, you may no longer be able to access your DVR.  Once properly configured, the TechPro DDNS (Dynamic DNS) service eliminates this common issue.

The way it works is by providing you with a domain name, like the following “MyDVR.techproddns.com”, that will always resolve to your current IP address. If the IP address changes, the DDNS service is notified by the DVR and updates the domain name to point to the new IP. Put simply, you can always reach your DVR by going to “MyDVR.techproddns.com”.

This document will show you how to setup your TechPro Security Products DVR in conjunction with a TechProDDNS domain name. It is important to note that some brands of DVRs may not work with DDNS, but all TechPro Security Products DVRs have this capability built-in.

Step 1 – Register for a TechPro DDNS Account.    

Step 2 – Set up a Domain Name.
Once your TechProDDNS account is set up, you will need to set up your domain name.

DDNS_Info

In the example above we chose the domain name “MyDRV.techproddns.com”, User ID: UserID1 and a Password: Password1.

You can choose any Domain Name, User ID and Password that you like, but they should be unique for each DVR.

Note: In Step 3 (the next step) you will have 2 options for configuring the DVR.

Option 1 is using the DVR Local interface and Option 2 is using the “Web Service” via Internet Explorer.

 If you use option 2, the web service, you must have the web service ActiveX Add-on, properly installed on Internet Explorer and your DVR must be on the same network as the computer you are using to access it.

Step 3 – Setup your DVR

Option 1 – DVR Local interface.
With a monitor and mouse connected to your DVR, login to the DVR Local Interface.

20131209_135318

Select “Settings” icon from the Main Menu.

2

Next Select “Network” icon.

3

Note: The example below assumes that your network IP scheme follows the 192.168.1.? Convention. This is normally the case.   It also assumes that your Default Gateway (typically your router) has an IP address of 192.168.1.1

5

 

TechPro DVRs come with a default static IP address of 192.168.1.108. This is normally fine and for the purposes of this document we are going to leave it that way. Do not check DHCP as we want this DVR to ALWAYS have the 192.168.1.108 IP. If DHCP is selected it may pick up a random IP from you router.

Note: Just be sure that 192.168.1.108 is not in your routers DHCP range. If it is another device on that network may get 192.168.1.108 assigned to it and cause conflicts.

We also recommend that you change the HTTP Port from the default 80 to 88. Port 80 is the default HTTP port for many devices and may also be blocked or cause conflicts.

Once you are done scroll to the bottom of the page an turn on the checkbox, next to “DDNS”.
Then double click on “DDNS” to open the DDNS Settings.

8

Select “Dyndns DDNS” from the “DDNS Type” dropdown and turn on the “Enable” checkmark next to it. Now enter the following information.

Server IP: techproddns.com
Port: Do Not Change this. Unlike the HTTP Incoming Port, this should remain 80
Domain Name: MyDVR.techproddns.com
User Name: UserName1
Password: Password1

Select “Save” at the bottom of the “DDNS Settings” popup and “Save” at the bottom of the “Network Setting” Page.

 

Option 2 – Web Service (via Internet Explorer).
The setup is identical to the setting above but, the user interface of the web service is a bit different. In Internet Explorer go to http://192.168.1.108, and login to your DVR.

WEB

Next Select “Network” from the navigation bar on the left.

Untitled-2

Note: The example above assumes that your network IP scheme follows the 192.168.1.? Convention. This is normally the case.   It also assumes that your Default Gateway (typically your router) has an IP address of 192.168.1.1

TechPro DVRs come with a default static IP address of 192.168.1.108. This is normally fine and for the purpose of this document we are going to leave it that way. Do not check DHCP since we want this DVR to ALWAYS have the 192.168.1.108 IP. If DHCP is selected it may pick up a random IP from your router.

Note: Just be sure that 192.168.1.108 is not in your routers DHCP range. If it is, another device on that network may get 192.168.1.108 assigned to it and cause conflicts.

We also recommend that you change the HTTP Port from the default 80 to 88. Port 80 is the default HTTP port for many devices and may also be blocked or cause conflicts.

Once that is done, scroll to the bottom of the page and check the box next to “DDNS”.

Select “Save” at the bottom of the page.

Now Select “DDNS” under the “Network” Menu.

Untitled-3

First select “Dyndns DDNS” from the “DDNS Type” Dropdown and check the “Enable” box next to it.

Now enter the following information:

Server IP: techproddns.com
Port: Do Not Change this. Unlike the HTTP Incoming Port, this should remain 80
Device Alias: MyDVR.techproddns.com
User Name: UserName1
Password: Password1

Select “Save” at the bottom of the page.

Step 4 – Port Forward your Router to your DVR.
OK, now you have configured your DVR to communicate with the DDNS server and keep it up to date with your current IP address.

The last thing we have to do is set up port forwarding in your router. Doing this tells the router that when a request comes in from “MyDVR.techProDDNS.com” on port “88”, to forward us to the DVR.

The user interface may vary depending on the specific router, but port forwarding is usually set up similar to this example. Here I am using a Linksys E1000 wireless router as shown below.

rOUTER

Most routers will have options for “Single Port Forwarding” and “Port Range Forwarding”.  In this example we will use “Single Port Forwarding”.

You may have noticed earlier, when we changed the “HTTP port” to “88” that there was also a “TCP port” set to “37777”.  We will need to port forward both of them. The HTTP port (88) is used by the “Web Service” when accessing the DVR from a browser, like Internet Explorer and the TCP port (37777) is used by software or mobile apps that will be accessing your DVR.

Once you find the area in your router for “Single Port Forwarding”, you will want to set things up similar to the settings shown above.

First, you will assign a descriptive name to each port forward. I used “DVR Web” for port”88” and “DVR Software” for port “37777”.

In the “External Port” and “Internal Port” fields you want to specify the port that the request will be coming in on “88” or “37777”.

Under the “Protocol” drop down there are usually 3 options, TCP, UDP and Both. We really only need to select “TCP” but selecting “Both” won’t hurt and covers all bases.

Now you need to tell the router the IP of the device you want to forward your request to. In this case it’s the DVR “192.168.1.108”. That’s why earlier we mentioned we do not want to check the “DHCP” option, this will ensure that the DVR is always “192.168.1.108”.

Last, you want to “Enable” or make sure this rule is “Active”.

 

Testing To See If Everything Works.
At this point if everything is setup correctly, you should be able to test it by launching “Internet Explorer” and going to the following domain:

HTTP://MyDVR.techProDDNS.com:88

If you get the “Web Service” login screen, then it’s all good!

WEB

One Last Note: Notice that we had to specify: 88 at the end of the domain name. This is because we change out HTTP port to 88. If we did not add: 88 the router would not know which rule to use to port forward our request. 

 

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NAT and Port Forwarding Part 2

Written By:
Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

How do I know if I have Double NAT or Triple NAT?

In my last article we talked about NAT and what it does, and Port Forwarding and what that is. This article is the second in that series.
It should be easy enough to get your DVR/NVR up and accessible on the LAN (Local Area Network) by inputting a valid LAN address in the DVR/NVR setup. Now the question is – how do we make it accessible from off site. I mentioned in the previous article – while we were in the router, we should check for it’s ‘External IP Address’ to see what is showing there. This is usually in the ‘Status’ section or ‘WAN’ setup. Now you will need to know what you found there. The WAN or Internet status will tell us a couple of things.

1. Is it a static or dynamic address? If you see something like ‘DHCP’ / ‘Obtain Automatically’ / or you just can’t find an address anywhere, then most likely the address is dynamic. For Port Forwarding purposes, we don’t want anything to be dynamic unless it absolutely has to be. In a dynamic address scenario, your IP address can change, and then your Port Forwarding is broken. If your router shows ‘DHCP’ or ‘Obtain Address Automatically’ it may not show the address it has. This then, becomes a little tricky to figure out.

A good way to test for Double/Triple NAT, if you are comfortable working in the DOS Command prompt – run a ‘tracert’ command. (Trace Route) Trace route shows every node , or device that you pass through on your way to a certain web site. (Try it on your favorite web site sometime – you might be amazed at how far your signal travels to get to a site that is physically hosted only a few miles away) The first ‘hops’ it shows may reveal Internal Addresses replying. This is a clear indication of how many routers you are passing through on your way to the Internet. To run a trace route command – open the Command prompt and type “tracert www.yahoo.com” without the quotes, and be sure to leave a space between tracert and the www (you can use any site you want, I just always use Yahoo or Google). To open a command prompt – Press and hold the Windows ‘Flying Flag’ key between Ctrl and Alt on your keyboard – this will pop up a ‘Run’ dialog. Type “cmd” (without quotes) and click Enter. This will open your Command Prompt. Then just type in “tracert www.yahoo.com” (without quotes) Make sure to leave a space after ‘tracert’. That will return a series of IP Addresses similar to this =

tracert

As you can see, the first hop shows 192.168.2.1 (Class C Internal Address) The second hop shows an address of 96.88.74.138 (NOT an Internal Address) and it also shows Comcast information as well, confirming that it is an External Address. This shows me that I have only one router in line before I get to the Internet, so only single NAT on my system. If you see two or three hops showing an Internal Address, then you have Double or Triple NAT or Quadruple NAT or…? The point being, if you see more than one Internal Address, your task just became a little more difficult.

Another method, if you can do it without taking the customers business offline, unplug the Cat-5 cable coming in to the ‘WAN’ or ‘Internet’ port on your router, and plug directly in to your PC. Restart your PC, then run an ‘ipconfig /all’ command from a DOS prompt and check the IP Address you find there. (Try to connect to the Internet with a browser to verify you are getting a valid address when you test this way.) Hopefully you will see an ‘Internet Address’, then you know there is nothing else in line to worry about. If, however you see an ‘Internal Address’ Make a quick note of the IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway, and DNS Servers you see there – we can use them in the router you are connected to. As soon as you have the information you need, pull that cable and disconnect from the Internet. (It is risky to connect directly to the Internet so keep your test as brief as possible)

2. If you see the IP address is set to ‘Static’ in your router, you WILL be seeing an IP address. Check to see if that IP address is a ‘Private Range’ address =
Class A = 10.0.0.0 through 10.255.255.255
Class B = 172.16.0.0 through 172.31.255.255
Class C = 192.168.0.0 through 192.168.255.255
When you see this on your WAN status (or WAN Address or Internet Address) –There is another device in line between you and the Internet that is performing NAT and you will have to Port Forward that device to the device you are looking at. To accomplish this you will need to set the router to a ‘Static’ address. The quick and dirty way is to take the IP address , Subnet mask, and Gateway that you discovered in the test above (connecting the routers’ WAN cable directly to your PC) and use them in the router you are working on. For DNS servers, use the ‘Gateway IP address’ or whatever you saw in the ipconfig test. (If you ran ‘ipconfig /all’ you will see DNS servers listed)
It is important to know that a modem with only a single LAN connection can also be a router. Even if it has only one port to connect to, it can be performing NAT and you’ll need to Port Forward it as well. (This is not usually the case on a cable connection – cable modems are generally set to ‘Bridge Mode’ so they are transparent on the network) This is where the ‘Status’ page of a router helps, if its WAN address is a private IP address, then your modem is also a router and it is supplying that address. Or , even more common, you will find another router in line between you and the Internet.

The easiest test here is to look for the ‘Gateway’ address showing on the WAN status. The gateway you see there will be the next router in line. Put in that address and see if you get a logon prompt. If you see another router, log into it and then run the same tests to see if it is directly connected to the Internet or not. Keep going until you no longer see private addresses on the router’s WAN connection. Start making a diagram of what you find and the different ranges of IP addresses you see on each one. You will need this information to map out your port forwarding. If you find only one router, you are golden – port forward it and call it done. If you find two or three routers in line – you are going to have to port forward every one of them.

Ports are forwarded directionally from the Internet toward your device.
The important thing to remember in Port Forwarding is that you must forward in ‘Daisy Chain’ fashion through all devices in your path.
Port Forward your ports from the modem to your first router – from your first  router to the next router – and so on until you get to the router where your device is connected. That last router will then be forwarded to your device.
**The most common mistake in port forwarding is to try to forward the first device in line directly to the camera or DVR IP Address instead of porting through the chain of devices.

Double NAT or Triple NAT can be tedious to set up because it takes extra time and you need to be sure of the connection sequence of your devices, and in some cases, you may find the customers network is not set up correctly. In my next article I will show you what to look for and how to fix it, as well as a detailed example of how to ‘Port Forward’ through a series of routers.
Happy Networking!

Previous Article in this series NAT and Port Forwarding Part 1

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SecurityCameraKing is the Amendment 64 Security Camera Authority

Written By:
Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Amendment64SCK-Seal
We here at SecurityCameraKing.com want to ensure you that when it comes to the needs of your surveillance equipment inspections for the Colorado Cannabis Community SecurityCameraKing is the Amendment 64 Security Camera Authority. We have carefully gone over Article XVIII, Section 16, otherwise known as “Amendment 64” and we have helped numerous Marijuana Retail Shops and growers with their security camera requirements. The following is a reference of what you need to be compliant as well as additional information you might need.

The following is a reference of what you need to be compliant as well as additional information you might need.

Analog or High Definition Cameras

While there are no stated minimum requirements for your security camera system needed for your Marijuana Retail establishment, we wanted to show you the difference between what an analog camera will provide versus a High Definition Security Camera. Both formats will get your inspection passed. Both can record on to a security recorder and can be viewed anywhere in the world you have Internet. Both will potentially deter criminals just for the reason that they will see the cameras and go on to the next store.

However, if you do ever have criminal activity, you would want to be sure you have the best recording possible. The difference is in the detail the camera will capture. The video from an analog camera will distort, or pixelate, when trying to zoom in and see detail. Click on the link below for a side by side video comparison.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/zgxDzKTvnVE?rel=0 
 

Imagine if someone broke into your store and you presented your security camera footage to the authorities. Having High Definition Secuirty Cameras could mean the difference between an arrest, due to a positive ID, versus not being able to see any detail. This is why we suggest going with High Definition Secuirty cameras such as HD-CVI or IP. Sure, you could get along with Analog to get your inspection passed, but in the long run, just how much is your Marijuana investment worth. Besides outside theft, you need to keep an eye on your employees as well as your crops. HD Security Cameras can also be used to monitor the healthiness of your crops (if you are a grower).

40 Days of 24/7 Security Recording

By law, you are required to have a surveillance system that can record and hold 40 days of security footage recording 24 hours per day non-stop. In order to figure out how much disc space you need for your security camera system, we have created an Online Hard Drive Calculator to help you determine that. Below are two examples of how much disc space you would need for 16 cameras. One of the major differences between an Analog Security Camera System and a High Definition Security Camera System, besides the clarity of the video, is how much disc space is needed to hold information for the 40 days.

Hard Drive Space for Analog
Hard Drive Example for an Analog System
Hard Drive Space for High Definition
Hard Drive Example for a 2MP High Definition System
As you can see it is very important to determine how much hard drive memory you need before you make your purchase so you can prove that your security camera system can record footage for 40 days. It is always a good idea to get more than you need to be sure.

Creating a Site Plan

It is very important to develop a site plan for your Marijuana Store in Colorado or for your Marijuana Growing Facility. This way, we can help you determine exactly where your security cameras should be placed. All entrances and exits, sales areas, growing areas, windows, storage areas, etc. need to have 24/7 camera surveillance, and we are experts when it comes to placement and coverage. All you need to do is provide us with a layout (whether it is professionally done or just scratched out on a piece of paper), and we will assist you with what you need to get you surveillance system inspection passed. Having the cameras configured in the site plan will also make it easy for your installation process. If you do not have an installer and do not want to do the installation yourself, we can recommend one. If you are in the Denver area, we can take care of the installation through our install department.

The image below represents a typical site plan. This is not an actual plan as we do not make public our customer’s facilities. This is just an example, and chances are your site plan will be very different.

amendment 64 site plan

Securing Your DVR

According to Amendment 64, your security recorder needs to be secure and in an area where it can not be tampered with. We have the perfect solution for this. Our DVR Lockbox will hold any of our DVRs or NVRs and keep it secure. It locks with a key and has an internal fan to keep your recorder from overheating. You can mount it to a wall or shelf using our optional brackets. Marijuana Inspectors love seeing these units being used. There is no way your DVR can be messed with or stolen, and so the footage will always be available to the authorities if needed.

DVR Lockbox From SecurityCameraKingA DVR Lockbox is the best way to keep your DVR secure

Advantages of Buying Your Amendment 64 Security Camera System from SecurityCameraKing.com

There are a lot of advantages of making your purchase through SecurityCameraKing.com.

Fast Shipping – We have a location in Colorado so ground shipping will be delivered in 1 business day in most cases. Orders over $500 will be shipped for free.

Colorado Shipping Map
Free US Based Tech Support
Every product we sell comes with Free Tech Support. We have some of the most knowledgeable techs that are fluent in security camera systems. In most cases we can log in remotely and do all the configurations for you.

Our Guarantee
We are so confident that the system we pick out for you will pass your Amendment 64 Security Camera Inspection that we provide a Certificate of Guarantee that states that the system we picked for you has met or exceeded the requirements needed to pass.

I-502 Security Camera Certificate
Free Remote Viewing Software
Using our free software you can view your cameras anywhere you have Internet on your Android, iPhone, iPad, Tablet, Mac and PC, provided your system is connected to your network.

Product Warranties
We have some of the best warranties in the industry. Most of our NVRs and DVRs have a 3 year warranty.

30 day “No Questions Asked” Money Back Guarantee
We know you will be happy with our systems. If for any reason you are dissatisfied, there is no need to worry, just return your unused and uninstalled items within 30 days in the original packaging for a complete refund.

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How to turn on and off an IP camera using Smart Devices | Getting more of your Smart Devices

Written By:
Monday, January 19th, 2015

smart bedroom

 

Many of you are installing cameras inside and outside of your homes and there are many times where you wish you could turn off your camera (at least the one in your bedroom) with the push of a button. Maybe by just giving a verbal command or simply pulling out your smart phone and using that to turn the camera. With “Smart”  items coming out for your home that are basically interconnected with your network, this is possible. I recently got a customer asking why there were no solutions to do this with his security system and after a brief pause I got a Eureka! moment. I figured that I already have some of these items and I can add them to my system. There are some items that you will need to accomplish this task. We are going to showcase some items that you will need and optional ones that will help you make your Home a Smart Home. Just follow this easy document on “How to turn on and off an IP camera using smart devices”

Items that you will need:

Single port Power Over Ethernet Switch POE-1G

POE1g

 

Belkin WeMo Insight Switch

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ivee – Sleek Voice-Activated Smart Clock [Optional for voice Command]

ivee_sleek_lifestyle

 

The main items would be a Single port PoE Switch POE-1G which will power the camera via an Ethernet cable and that would get connected to a Wemo Insight Switch.

The Belkin WeMo Smart Switch communicates with your  IOS or Android Device to turn the power on any 15 amp 120V AC device on or off. This can be used to to control lamps, Christmas lights or anything that will use a 120VAC power source. We will be connecting the PoE single port switch to this device allowing us to power the device or turn it off, but I always like to push things even further. Why not add a Siri like device to operate not just this but any other Belkin WeMo Switch or Nest Thermostat devices? Well for this we need a device called ivee which doubles as a Smart Clock that connects to any smart device. I found myself needing to change my alarm from time to time and found this smart clock that also allowed me to turn up or down my temperature using my Nest Thermostat as well as turn on of off the lamps or even open or close my front door making my life a little bit easier since in times I forgot if I set my alarm correctly and also if my front door dead bolt was in the locked position, a simple command to the ivee from the comfort of my bed allows me to do this as well as allow me to turn off the camera in my bedroom when I decide I need some privacy.

There are so many things that can be done with this type of device that people do not realize it. For example you can add a command to enable one of these Smart Switches and on this smart switch you can have a relay that will accept any high or low voltage device, lets say you want to turn off a non smart device such as a fan. If you are a techie you can have this device restart a router or any network device that does not have the ability to be accessed or the manufacturer failed to add a shutdown feature to it.

 

One big project that I will be integrating this would be to add this as Do it Yourself Pet Feeder where I will be ordering one of these and dismantle it and use it to operate a stepper motor that will have an auger drill with a hopper that will have a “V” shape. This will enable me to command Ivee to feed my cats in the morning while I get ready to go to work relieving from doing so as well as giving me the ability to feed them once I get home.

 

This gentleman here has a Feeder for his fishes, You can see how it works. You have a drill that will be used as an auger and a hopper that will have the feed. You can time the feed for my cats I would say 3 minutes or so for each cat once it has does its thing it should turn off , a simple time that resets itself should do the trick for this now keep in mind that for indoors you need to enclose this device so that any children or pets do not mess with the device since it does power using alternate current. As well as adding fuses to protect the circuit.

 

Irwin-49924

 

Smart Home Devices should not only allow you to enjoy Media but assist you with the smaller tasks that take so much of your time. Having these devices will enable you to view you home from anywhere in the world, open or close your front door when ever you wish to do so, like when you are at work and all of a sudden something breaks in your home there is no longer a need to call in off because you need your washing machine fixed , you can simply have the Handy Man work on the washing machine while you view him or her on your Surveillance system and allow him entry using your Smart Lock. Since I have cameras all over my interior and exterior I can monitor anything that happens in my home as well as allow anyone entry. Another example is if you are renting your Home or Apartment,there are times where landlords do not know they are not allowed into your apartment or home, knowing if your landlord is coming and going at times they are not allowed will help you in a situation where the landlord or any individual has entered without your consent.

So next time you are buying or have an item laying around look at what else you can do not just what the manufacturer designed it for, Keep in mind that these and any hack can lead to voiding your warranty but if you are aware of this and the item is already out of warranty go ahead and learn , Trust me you will enjoy it. One big example is when I helped a Customer use an Auto tracking IP camera to track deer and other wild animals in here property and have the video footage go to her webpage as well as her Youtube account. She was happy with her setup as well as I was happy after I had completed this task. 😉

 

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How to Troubleshoot Analog Security Cameras

Written By:
Friday, December 6th, 2013

Frustrated Man

Help my camera is dead and I don’t know what to do!!!! Relax the Camera is not going to cause a cascading failure and blow up the whole system or burn the house down. You will need a multi meter to verify voltages and amps.  Depending on where your cameras are located is how you may want to proceed. If the cameras are easy to get to the first thing I would do is break out a ladder if needed and get up to the camera.

If your camera has IR or infrared cup your hand around the camera to trick the sensor so it thinks it is night then see if the IRs do come on.  If they do good, I know the camera is getting power. I would still test power output regardless if IRs comes on.  The infrared does not need much to power up so there could still be an issue.  If this camera is a DC then you should get at or above 12 volts DC. Should the camera be AC the reading should be at or above 24 volts AC.  11.7 volts is close but not enough 23.9 volts is close but not enough. The voltage must be at or above the required amount. It has been my experience that “almost” in voltage needed is not enough. Almost only counts in horse shoes and hand grenades.  The camera may give you a video feed during day but as soon as the Infra-Red led come on the camera will act very strange, or the camera will act strange to begin with.

Now at this point let us say you have less than required or no power at the camera.  You now need to go to your power supply to test it also taking the camera down at this point is advisable. Check the connections on the coax cable. Twist on BNC connectors is convenient but they do get loose if they move or shake for whatever reason they will make the camera have grainy or lines or a waviness to the image produced. BNC Twists are an unreliable connection. I like them for bench testing since they are so convenient. For installation I avoid them if I can. In the early days of computing there was a phenomena called chip creep. Ram chips would get hot and cold and slowly work themselves out of the slot on mother board. It is logical that the same would happen with the twists over time.

Crimp on BNC connectors and compression fittings are the best. Some people will swear by crimp on BNC other people will swear by compression BNC. In either case they typically do not become loose preventing video loss or poor images. For both types of connectors you need the specified tool to install the ends. Pliers will not get the job done they will only create a problem.

Now that we have the camera in question down it is time to go back to the power supply and do some testing. Check output on the channel of the power supply is do you get 12vdc or 24vac. If we get the full output needed at power supply connect camera directly to power supply and DVR. Does the issue go away in day and night mode? If it does then you now know something is going on the cable.  If not we know for sure the camera is not operating correctly. This could be from any number of reasons. To prevent the cameras from going bad a surge protector is always recommended. If you can get a battery backup and conditioner, the conditioner cleans up feedback or interference on the power side that can cause cameras to act very strange.

For cable issues there several ways to go about determining what to do next. First is how long of a cable run do you have? Coax cables have limitations on distance. The common cable RG59 which most people use for CCTV has the highest attenuation or signal loss. It is never recommended to use RG59 above a distance of 1000 feet. Some people do not recommend to use RG59 over 750 feet. Having a cable that has an impedance of 75 ohms is crucial. If the impedance is outside of that you will get more signal loss.  If you are using RG6 this coax cable has lower attenuation so you can get more distance before running into problems. Normally you can get up to 1500 feet. RG6 is recommended for use between 1000 – 1500 feet. As there is a price difference I would not use RG6 unless distance required it. RG11 is the thickest of the cables used. It does have the lowest attenuation of all coax cable. You can get up to 2000 feet on a home run.  With all cable bending and pulling cable can and will damage the cable. Using a lubricant helps in preventing damage from pulling. When it comes to bending any cable you cannot bend, twist, or roll up cable tighter that the radius of the cable itself. If you do, get a new piece of cable because you just damaged that cable. The cable may work but the longer the run the more likely you will have a bad video feed. Once you bend the cable that far you put a kink in the wire and add to the resistance. Another issue I have seen is failure to ensure there are no jagged edges for the cable to get caught on or sliced into. For example running cable in an attic there are old rusty nails and screws everywhere. If a screw gets in contact with cable you can inadvertently add an extra ground the “POOF” no more video or you get static if you’re lucky. Sometimes it just is not possible to measure resistance on a cable run end to end that is why I say take the camera down so we can isolate the issue.

With the steps I have outlined you should be able to troubleshoot your system when issues arise. I can tell you that most issues in CCTV arise from to long of cable runs with the wrong cable type. Power is especially problematic as the thinner the wire the higher the voltage drop at distance.

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